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RE: [GTh] Consistency and Accretion in Thomas

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  • E Bruce Brooks
    Mike, Really? How long, for comparison, is the Book of Obadiah? Or Haggai? I don t think we are in a position to tell the ancients how to write, or how long.
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 2, 2012
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      Mike,


      Really? How long, for comparison, is the Book of Obadiah? Or Haggai?

       

      I don’t think we are in a position to tell the ancients how to write, or how long. We can only stand back and see what they do.

       

      A chapter of course can be any size. But I should think it unlikely that a first chapter of a work written simultaneously would immediately begin its second chapter by switching to a different sponsoring figure (James > Thomas), and then compound the shift by placing another Thomas piece up top, at the head of the whole work. That looks to me not like a continuation, but a reconsideration.

       

      And if despite all gThos 13 does begin a second chapter, where does that chapter end?

       

      Bruce

       

      E Bruce Brooks

      Warring States Project

      University of Massachusetts at Amherst

       

    • Mike Grondin
      [Bruce:] ... It s hard to tell, but Haggai appears to be about twice as long as L1-12. Obadiah also appears to be longer, though by how much is hard to say.
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 2, 2012
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        [Bruce:]
        > How long, for comparison, is the Book of Obadiah? Or Haggai?
         
        It's hard to tell, but Haggai appears to be about twice as long as L1-12.
        Obadiah also appears to be longer, though by how much is hard to say.
        But Obadiah is a prophetic proclamation which has a compositional unity
        not apparent in L1-12. At the end of Obadiah, I would suggest that one
        doesn't find oneself asking "Is that all there is?" In any case, if that's the
        sole example of a short biblical text, your suggestion remains unlikely.
         
        [Bruce:]
        > I don’t think we are in a position to tell the ancients how to write,
        or how long.
         
        Really, this remark is irrelevant, beneath you, and best forgotten.
         
        [Bruce:]
        > A chapter of course can be any size. But I should think it unlikely
        that a first
        > chapter of a work written simultaneously would immediately begin
        its second
        > chapter by switching to a different sponsoring figure (James >
        Thomas), and
        > then compound the shift by placing another Thomas piece up top, at the
        head
        > of the whole work. That looks to me not like a continuation, but a
        reconsideration.
         
        On the other hand, the Prologue and L13 may be taken as framing for a segment.
        (Thinking in terms of "chapters" doesn't strike me as supported by the content.)
         
        Mike G.
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