Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

2428[gthomas] Re: Jewishness of GOT

Expand Messages
  • Michael Grondin
    Mar 11, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      At 10:32 AM 03/11/00 -0500, Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
      >When did antisemitic passages get added to our canonical texts? This, to
      >me, is the difference between "Jewish-Christian" and "Gentile-Christian"
      >in a nutshell.

      Ah, now we're getting somewhere, though not where you want to go. I'll
      stipulate that anti-semitism is a sufficient condition for a text having
      been written or redacted by Gentile Christians. But it's not a necessary
      condition - which means that this criterion fails to establish the
      conclusion you want it to.

      If a passage is anti-semitic (in the proper sense of that word), it
      presumably cannot have been written by a Jewish Christian, but if a text is
      NOT anti-semitic, it might still have been written by a Gentile Christian.
      In terms of people instead of texts, while all anti-semitic Christians are
      Gentiles, not all Gentile Christians are anti-semitic. (And here, of
      course, I'm using the word 'Christian' in the sense of anyone who believes
      that Jesus had a supernatural nature, whether that person follows the
      ethical injunctions attributed to Jesus or not.)

      Since I have a feeling I'm not explaining things too well this morning, let
      me put it another way. Let's assume that I agree with you that (1') if a
      text contains anti-semitisms, then it shows itself to have been written or
      redacted by Gentile Xn's. It does NOT follow that (2') if a text does NOT
      contain anti-semitisms, then it WASN'T written or redacted by Gentile Xn's.
      In terms of symbolic logic:

      (1) If A, then B.
      (2) If not-A, then not-B.

      (1) says that A is a sufficient condition for B, (2) says that it's a
      necessary condition. (1) does NOT imply (2). I'm willing to stipulate to
      (1), but what you need is (2), and that's what you haven't established.
      Therefore, the criterion of anti-semitism does NOT show that GOT is
      "Jewish-Christian". It can be "Gentile-Christian" and still not have any
      anti-semitisms.

      Regards,
      Mike

      The Coptic Gospel of Thomas, saying-by-saying
      http://www.geocities.com/athens/9068/sayings.htm
    • Show all 17 messages in this topic