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Thames cable car - for cyclists?

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  • Francis Sedgemore
    Last week I was cycling around the docklands, on the day that the passenger gondolas for the new Thames cable car were first being tested. What struck me on
    Message 1 of 4 , May 15, 2012
      Last week I was cycling around the docklands, on the day that the passenger gondolas for the new Thames cable car were first being tested.

      What struck me on seeing the passenger cars was how small they are. In fact, they are not much larger than ski lift gondolas, and I fail to see how cyclists will be able to transport their bikes across the river in this way, as has been promised by Transport for London. That is if cyclists can afford the ticket price in the first place.

      Another thing that struck me was how unstable the cars are in the face of a stiff but not unusually hard wind blowing along the Thames. As I watched the diminutive gondolas make their way along the kilometre-long cable at breakneck speed, I noticed them swaying from side to side in a most alarming manner. Even when the cars were static, as viewed from the Albert Dock terminus, I felt nauseous as I followed their flapping motion. And that was with me on terra firma!

      Thames cable car - sick bags advised.

      Francis

      --
      Dr Francis Sedgemore
      journalist and science writer
      www.sedgemore.com
    • Ray
      When you go mountain biking down the ski runs the gondola s have an arrangement for the bikes to be loaded on the outside. However, given the description of
      Message 2 of 4 , May 15, 2012

        When you go mountain biking down the ski runs the gondola’s have an arrangement for the bikes to be loaded on the outside.

         

        However, given the description of the gondola’s swinging about I would hate to see my lovely Condor plummeting down into the Thames!!

         

        Sounds more like a fun ride at a theme park!! Looking forward to that part!!

         

        From: greenwichcyclists@yahoogroups.com [mailto:greenwichcyclists@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Francis Sedgemore
        Sent: 15 May 2012 12:53
        To: greenwichcyclists@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [greenwichcyclists] Thames cable car - for cyclists?

         

         

        Last week I was cycling around the docklands, on the day that the passenger gondolas for the new Thames cable car were first being tested.

        What struck me on seeing the passenger cars was how small they are. In fact, they are not much larger than ski lift gondolas, and I fail to see how cyclists will be able to transport their bikes across the river in this way, as has been promised by Transport for London. That is if cyclists can afford the ticket price in the first place.

        Another thing that struck me was how unstable the cars are in the face of a stiff but not unusually hard wind blowing along the Thames. As I watched the diminutive gondolas make their way along the kilometre-long cable at breakneck speed, I noticed them swaying from side to side in a most alarming manner. Even when the cars were static, as viewed from the Albert Dock terminus, I felt nauseous as I followed their flapping motion. And that was with me on terra firma!

        Thames cable car - sick bags advised.

        Francis

        --
        Dr Francis Sedgemore
        journalist and science writer
        www.sedgemore.com

      • Francis Sedgemore
        The cable car could provide a crossing every 15 seconds carrying up to 2,500 passengers per hour in each direction, equivalent to the capacity of 50 buses.
        Message 3 of 4 , May 15, 2012
          "The cable car could provide a crossing every 15 seconds carrying up to 2,500 passengers per hour in each direction, equivalent to the capacity of 50 buses."

          Ready,… steady,… JUMP!

          There is no way I would trust my beloved velo to a clamp on the outside of a cable car travelling 50 metres above the River Thames. It's bad enough on the back of a Dartford Crossing control car.

          Francis

          On 15 May 12, at 15:18, Ray wrote:

          When you go mountain biking down the ski runs the gondola’s have an arrangement for the bikes to be loaded on the outside.

          However, given the description of the gondola’s swinging about I would hate to see my lovely Condor plummeting down into the Thames!!

          Sounds more like a fun ride at a theme park!! Looking forward to that part!!

          -- 
          Dr Francis Sedgemore
          journalist and science writer
          www.sedgemore.com

        • Mark PHC
          Bikes go inside. It looks like the seat tips up if the video on this page is accurate: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/projectsandschemes/15959.aspx I haven t
          Message 4 of 4 , May 15, 2012
            Bikes go inside. It looks like the seat tips up if the video on this page is accurate:
            http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/projectsandschemes/15959.aspx

            I haven't seen any pricing yet but if it's affordable, I expect to use it at some point.

            Mark



            On 15 May 2012 15:33, Francis Sedgemore <francis@...> wrote:
             

            "The cable car could provide a crossing every 15 seconds carrying up to 2,500 passengers per hour in each direction, equivalent to the capacity of 50 buses."

            Ready,… steady,… JUMP!

            There is no way I would trust my beloved velo to a clamp on the outside of a cable car travelling 50 metres above the River Thames. It's bad enough on the back of a Dartford Crossing control car.

            Francis

            On 15 May 12, at 15:18, Ray wrote:

            When you go mountain biking down the ski runs the gondola’s have an arrangement for the bikes to be loaded on the outside.

            However, given the description of the gondola’s swinging about I would hate to see my lovely Condor plummeting down into the Thames!!

            Sounds more like a fun ride at a theme park!! Looking forward to that part!!

            -- 
            Dr Francis Sedgemore
            journalist and science writer
            www.sedgemore.com


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