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Axion Estin Conference Program

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    The Axion Estin Foundation, Inc Presents The Greek Byzantine Choir Director: Lycourgos Angelopoulos With the Blessings of His Eminence Archbishop Demetrios of
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 21, 2007
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      The Axion Estin Foundation, Inc
      Presents
      The Greek Byzantine Choir
      Director: Lycourgos Angelopoulos

      With the Blessings of His Eminence Archbishop Demetrios of America

      Introduction

      Dr. Joseph Pantginis & Angelo Lampousis, The Axion Estin Foundation, Inc

      Entrance

      "Unto you, O Theotokos" Kontakion of the Akathistos Hymn (7th century)
      Fourth Plagal Tone.







      PART 1

      A. Chants from Research

      1. "O Zion, Adorn Thy Chamber" (Katakosmison ton numfona sou Sion…),
      the First Sticheron of Aposticha of the Presentation of Our Lord
      (February 2nd). Transcribed by Christian Troelsgard from the MS Ambr.
      gr. 139 Sup. (XIV c).

      B. Chants from Tradition

      a) Hymns from the feastday of The Presentation of Our Lord

      2. "Lord I Cry Out to Thee" from Mount Athos, First Tone, Anonymous

      3. Verses from Psalm 140 (141) and 141 (142) from Mount Athos,
      First Tone, as chanted by First Chanter of Mount Athos Deacon
      Dionysios Firfiris (†1990)

      4. "Say, O Simeon" First Vesperal Sticheron
      First Tone

      5. "The Gates of Heaven have opened" Vesperal Doxastikon, composed by
      Petros Lambadarios of the Ecumenical Patriarchate (†1778),
      Plagal Second Tone

      6. Magnificants and the Heirmos of the Ninth Ode
      Third Tone

      b) From the service of the Akathist Hymn

      7. "The Great General" Kathisma hymn of traditional Mount Athos
      melody, as transcribed by Fr. George Rigas (†1960) from the
      Annunciation Monastery of the island of Skiathos
      First Tone

      8. Heirmoi from the Canon,
      Fourth Tone (legetos)

      9. "The Beauty of Your Chastity" Kathisma, Music by Petros
      Lambadarios, Third Tone

      INTERMISSION


      PART 2

      A. Chants from Research

      10. "We Worship Your Cross" In Greek and Latin.
      From the manuscript of the Cathedral of Benevento, as researched by
      Marcel Perès and Lycourgos Angelopoulos.


      B. Chants from Tradition

      The services of Holy Thursday, Friday, and Saturday

      11. "Alleluia", melismatic old chant. Anonymous
      Plagal Fourth Tone

      12. "When the Glorious Apostles" Troparion,
      Plagal Fourth Tone (triphonos)

      13. Heirmoi and troparia from the Canon of the Matins of Holy Friday
      Plagal Second Tone (tetraphonos)

      14. "The Lamentations" from the Matins of Holy Saturday, in three
      stanzas. Two stanzas in Plagal First Tone, and the last in Third
      Tone, chanted with verses of the Ps. 118 (119)

      15. "Let all mortal flesh keep silent" Cherubic hymn of Holy
      Saturday, composed by Iakovos Protopsalt of the Ecumenical
      Patriarchate (†1800) Plagal First Tone.

      16. "Hymn of the Three Youths" Melody by George Redestinos,
      Protopsalt of the Ecumenical Patriarchate (†1889)
      First Tone

      17. Kratima. Composition by the renowned Byzantine Maistor Ioannis
      Koukouzelis
      First Tone

      Notes on Kratima

      The Kratima is a striking and impressive composition. It is found in
      the Codex 711 MPT.
      The kratimata are free compositions, in which meaningless syllables,
      like te-ri-rem, to-ro-ro, are used instead of verses. Thus, the
      composer having no obligation to a certain text advances to the
      composition of pure music. The learned Metropolitan of Philadelphia,
      Gerasimos Vlachos the Cretan (17th century), writes that: "according
      to theology symbolism, the terere does not wish to signify anything
      other, than the incomprehensibility of the Godhead". The composer
      Michel Adamis has observed that: "the kratima is the Byzantine form of
      pure music which is expressed in works that exist in themselves".
      The renowned Byzantine Maistor Ioannis Koukouzelis also had the
      surname Papadopoulos, as attested in manuscripts of the beginning of
      the 14th century. He is a saint of the Orthodox Church, (his feast is
      on the 1st of October), as well as one of the chief representatives of
      Byzantine music (he is referred to as the second wellspring of Greek
      music, the first being St. Ioannis Damaskinos. His vast output is, on
      the most part, unpublished today, and exists only in manuscripts form.
      The Greek Byzantine Choir has begun issuing a series of cassettes and
      CDs which aim to include (to the extent that this is possible) all the
      works of Ioannis Koukouzelis.
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