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Re: Multi-topic discussion opener.

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  • Stan Takis
    ... the beginning, Stan. And I PROMISE to contribute as weakly as I am able in a few days. That s OK, Louie. I have been limited in time myself, as my
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 14, 2005
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      > I am very interested in this discussion, and have following it from
      the beginning, Stan. And I PROMISE to contribute as weakly as I am
      able in a few days.

      That's OK, Louie. I have been limited in time myself, as my
      84-year-old mother underwent an operation Tuesday for the removal of a
      large, benign tumor on her spine. I've been caring for my dad since
      she's been in the hospital, and I've had less time than I thought I'd
      have. I have more comments coming later as well.

      **************

      Justin, I think your comments are worth a lot and show a lot of
      maturity and wisdom for one as young as you. I'm a latecomer to church
      music, relatively, and I don't know how much I can contribute, but,
      God-willing, you will be able to be fruitful for many years.

      I want to comment on one thing you said about how Gregorian chant
      appeals to you. I'm not (yet) a militant for one kind of chant. I
      think the liturgy should be chanted, but so far Byzantine, Znammeny,
      or Gregorian are all legitimate forms of Christian chant to me, and I
      also feel the simplified chant of Sakallarides and others can assist
      appropriately in prayer. I'm thinking that a derivative form of
      Byzantine-influenced chanting might emerge as the most appropriate
      chant for the English language and the sensibilities of Americans and
      other Western, English-speaking nations.

      English is a rich, diverse, and expressive language that needs very
      little musical ornamentation to derive added expression and emphasis.
      Anyone who doubts this should become familiar with Shakespeare. One
      reason I like the King James text, despite its Protestant (for some
      heretical) origin, is that it is in the same English as the Bard.
      English, in my opinion, has not fared very well to highly ornamented
      and melismatic music. (Despite Handel's oratorios, where actually the
      music itself is the star, not the texts. Handel was German with an
      Italian influence. Even the Hallelujah chorus had its beginning in one
      of his Italian pieces.)

      I think the English language fares best in a simple unadorned chant.
      Because of its Germanic origin, English has mostly one and
      two-syllable words. Greek has many multi-syllable words and certain
      syllables must be emphasized more than others to bring out the full
      meaning of the words. English has less need for this. E.g. Kyrie/Lord,
      Kardhia/heart, Pnevmatos/Ghost (from geist, spirit is from Latin). As
      a linguist, you can probably get what I'm saying here.

      *******************

      Fr. Ephraim, I echo Justin's thanks for the book titles. I want those
      books as well.

      Since everyone is using their Orthodox Chrismation names to sign off,
      this time I will remain yours,

      Stylianos
    • Justin Bates
      Louie, Whenever you have the time, please join in. How was the Antiochian Village? I wanted to go, but I didn t have the time or money for it. Which region
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 14, 2005
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        Louie,

        Whenever you have the time, please join in. How was
        the Antiochian Village? I wanted to go, but I didn't
        have the time or money for it. Which region of the
        country are you from? Do you know if Dr. Jessica
        Suchy-Pilalis is planning on producing any chanting
        materials? How was Fr. Elias Bitar as a teacher?

        Stan, hope your mother gets well soon.

        Best wishes,

        Justin "Chrysostomos"
      • Louie Quintana
        Chrysostomos, The teaching and exposure to various origins of music has been excellent here at the Sacred Music Institute (e.g., Byzantine Chant, Choral
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 15, 2005
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          Chrysostomos,
           
          The teaching and exposure to various 'origins' of music has been excellent here at the Sacred Music Institute (e.g., Byzantine Chant, Choral works of Arabic, Russian, 'Slavic', Carpathian, Serbian origins--though the choral stuff is very new to me.)  The Institute goes on through this Sunday the 17th.  Dr. Jessica Suchy-Pilalis is an incredible teacher.  Her knowledge is vast, to say the least, and she can take quite a diverse group of folks with a variety of levels of experience and teach them all at the same time.  ANY opportunity for you to learn directly from her I would recommend seeking out at any expense.  Fr. Elias Bitar's voice is incredible, and the Arabic influence in his voice is always inspiring to me.  He is genuinely nice, and we will have a brief 'Bird's Eye of Byzantine Music Theory" class from him today.  If you want my notes and Dr. Suchy-Pilasis' notes for us for your private use, I would gladly mail them to you.  Just send me your address offline.  I have some good contacts from here to find out in the future who will be teaching at these Institutes (especially as it involves my interest, Byzantine Chant specifically) and I will gladly pass that onto you in the future, as well.
           
          To answer your question, I am in Boise, Idaho, and which is in the Metropolis of Denver (GOA) under the spiritual direction of His Eminence, Metropolitan ISAIAH.
           
           
          Stan,
           
          I will keep your mother in my prayers, and may her recovery go well.  By day, (when I'm not wearing my 'Superman' Reader's garb, I'm a physical therapist specializing in both home health and hospice care for mainly older folks.  If you have specific questions about your mother's rehab/recovery that I might be able to address, please email me offline.  I'd be glad to offer anything I can in terms of guidance, direction or support.
           
          Everyone, I would appreciate your prayers, as well, on my behalf.  Learning all I have thus far in my time here, my heart aches for a more and more authentic spiritual journey 'amongst the Greeks.'  Every place has it's challenges and its blessings, of course; considering the variety of responsibilities that I have the blessing of undertaking through the guidance and direction of my parish priest and spiritual father, I feel the weight of service at times, even as a lowly Reader.  But, may everything be done according to God's will and purpose. 
           
          Well, time to focus on the Liturgy for this morning.  Please forgive my ramblings.
           
          Rdr. Moses


          Justin Bates <justinraybates@...> escribió:
          Louie,

          Whenever you have the time, please join in.  How was
          the Antiochian Village?  I wanted to go, but I didn't
          have the time or money for it.  Which region of the
          country are you from?  Do you know if Dr. Jessica
          Suchy-Pilalis is planning on producing any chanting
          materials?  How was Fr. Elias Bitar as a teacher?

          Stan, hope your mother gets well soon.

          Best wishes,

          Justin "Chrysostomos"

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