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Re: Yak traks

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  • Christopher <challaxs@yahoo.com>
    Yeah, yeah, I know it s tracks but I m trying to...uh...impress any one who migh happen to want to hire me to write advertising....yeah, that s it. My sense
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2003
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      Yeah, yeah, I know it's "tracks" but I'm trying to...uh...impress any one who migh happen to want to hire me to write advertising....yeah, that's it. My sense of humor isn't really bad enough to stoop that low. Honest. :-)

      > today I saw a very rare set of tracks, Yaks! Someone
      > has a domesticated Yak with them. I have see them
      > before and I know Ken has seen the very distinct Yak
      > track they leave behind.
      > Guessing by the size I'd say it was a full grown male.


      Pardon my doubts here, but are you serious or is this an inside joke
      of the group's that I'm not aware of?

      Maybe they can be ridden? That seems a lot better than leading one
      around on a leash or whatever. "Yeah, I'm just walking my yak." heh.

      Speaking of semi-exotic stuff to take on trails with you, based on
      what I've read of llamas, they might make decent pack animals.
      Sure-footed, don't damage the trail like horses, need relatively
      little to eat or drink as such animals go...Not sturdy enough to
      ride, but if they could carry 60 pounds of gear instead of me, that'd
      be cool. That is, after investigating the matter more thoroughly,
      and if I had a barn for one, and all that other stuff, I might
      seriously consider getting one. Something to keep in mind for the
      next life when I'm idle and wealthy, you know?

      Like anything you take out into the bush with you, they'd have
      multiple uses, too. For those UP summer nights when it was 85 in
      the daytime, but then unexpectedly freezes overnight, you'd have
      something warm to curl up your back against. And...if you got
      stranded and lost for a long time, you could eat it. Kind of a self-
      propelled MRE on legs to tag around after you, you can turn the
      packaging into a coat. :-)
    • dickbolton3 <dickbolton3@hotmail.com>
      Christopher - Somebody beat you to it on the Yak Traks copywriting thing, more or less. I m not the gear guru around here, but there s a product out there
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2003
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        Christopher - Somebody beat you to it on the Yak Traks
        copywriting thing, more or less. I'm not the gear guru around
        here, but there's a product out there called Yaktrax that is sort of
        like a very set of flexible crampons. They fit on your boot soles
        and are supposed to improve traction in snowy or icy walking
        conditions. Think "tire chains" for boots, maybe.

        You're right about the "inside joke" business. Ken Knight
        reported having used these things on a hike some time ago, and
        that led to the usual extensive discussion.

        As for llamas, the things are known to have a nasty proclivity for
        spitting. They seem to be nice enough animals otherwise.
        Much larger in real life up close than you would imagine them.

        Dick Bolton
        ------------------------------

        --- In greatlakeshikes@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher
        <challaxs@y...>" <challaxs@y...> wrote:
        > Yeah, yeah, I know it's "tracks" but I'm trying to...uh...impress
        any one who migh happen to want to hire me to write
        advertising....yeah, that's it. My sense of humor isn't really bad
        enough to stoop that low. Honest. :-)
        >
        > > today I saw a very rare set of tracks, Yaks! Someone
        > > has a domesticated Yak with them. I have see them
        > > before and I know Ken has seen the very distinct Yak
        > > track they leave behind.
        > > Guessing by the size I'd say it was a full grown male.
        >
        >
        > Pardon my doubts here, but are you serious or is this an inside
        joke
        > of the group's that I'm not aware of? <snip>
        >
      • Mary <mgainsley@yahoo.com>
        I read a news article some time in the past year that described the unique security measures that a factory in Chicago had - they kept several llamas on their
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 2, 2003
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          I read a news article some time in the past year that described the
          unique security measures that a factory in Chicago had - they kept
          several llamas on their property. It seems llamas are naturally
          curious and investigate anything unusual in their vicinity. Their
          size and nasty proclivity for spitting kept many a burglar at bay.

          --- In greatlakeshikes@yahoogroups.com, "dickbolton3
          <dickbolton3@h...>" <dickbolton3@h...> wrote:
          > As for llamas, the things are known to have a nasty proclivity for
          > spitting. They seem to be nice enough animals otherwise.
          > Much larger in real life up close than you would imagine them.
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