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Time stamps in GPX - decimal seconds

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  • Alan
    Hi GPX Forum I m wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than one second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS device,
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 4, 2010
      Hi GPX Forum
      I'm wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than one
      second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS device,
      but it seems that the xsd:dateTime does not allow for decimals.
      Is this a subject already fully canvassed?
    • Dan Foster
      Hello, ... GPX allows decimal seconds, as does ISO 8601, on which GPX XML dateTime is based. Element: time Creation/modification timestamp for element. Date
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 4, 2010
        Hello,

        Thursday, November 4, 2010, 6:16:30 AM, Alan wrote:

        >
        > Hi GPX Forum
        > I'm wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than one
        > second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS device,
        > but it seems that the xsd:dateTime does not allow for decimals.
        > Is this a subject already fully canvassed?

        GPX allows decimal seconds, as does ISO 8601, on which GPX' XML dateTime is
        based.

        Element: time

        Creation/modification timestamp for element. Date and time in are in Univeral Coordinated Time (UTC), not local time! Conforms to ISO 8601 specification for date/time representation. Fractional seconds are allowed for millisecond timing in tracklogs.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601
        Decimal fractions may also be added to any of the three time elements. A decimal point, either a comma or a dot (without any preference as stated most recently in resolution 10 of the 22nd General Conference CGPM in 2003), is used as a separator between the time element and its fraction. A fraction may only be added to the lowest order time element in the representation. To denote "14 hours, 30 and one half minutes", do not include a seconds figure. Represent it as "14:30,5", "1430,5", "14:30.5", or "1430.5". There is no limit on the number of decimal places for the decimal fraction. However, the number of decimal places needs to be agreed to by the communicating parties.




        --
        Dan Foster
      • Alan
        That gives me encouragement to investigate further, thanks. ... From: gpsxml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gpsxml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dan Foster Sent:
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 5, 2010
          That gives me encouragement to investigate further, thanks.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: gpsxml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gpsxml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          Dan Foster
          Sent: Thursday, 4 November 2010 11:29 PM
          To: Alan
          Subject: Re: [gpsxml] Time stamps in GPX - decimal seconds

          Hello,

          Thursday, November 4, 2010, 6:16:30 AM, Alan wrote:

          >
          > Hi GPX Forum
          > I'm wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than
          > one second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS
          > device, but it seems that the xsd:dateTime does not allow for decimals.
          > Is this a subject already fully canvassed?

          GPX allows decimal seconds, as does ISO 8601, on which GPX' XML dateTime is
          based.

          Element: time

          Creation/modification timestamp for element. Date and time in are in
          Univeral Coordinated Time (UTC), not local time! Conforms to ISO 8601
          specification for date/time representation. Fractional seconds are allowed
          for millisecond timing in tracklogs.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601
          Decimal fractions may also be added to any of the three time elements. A
          decimal point, either a comma or a dot (without any preference as stated
          most recently in resolution 10 of the 22nd General Conference CGPM in 2003),
          is used as a separator between the time element and its fraction. A fraction
          may only be added to the lowest order time element in the representation. To
          denote "14 hours, 30 and one half minutes", do not include a seconds figure.
          Represent it as "14:30,5", "1430,5", "14:30.5", or "1430.5". There is no
          limit on the number of decimal places for the decimal fraction. However, the
          number of decimal places needs to be agreed to by the communicating parties.




          --
          Dan Foster



          ------------------------------------

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