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Which "Style" should I use for Tracking

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  • christian.freisen
    Hi Folks, is there a best way for creating GPX-Files for adding Locations to photos? I tried with only adding waypoints to the file but most Photo-Taggers
    Message 1 of 8 , May 2, 2010
      Hi Folks,

      is there a "best way" for creating GPX-Files for adding Locations to photos?
      I tried with only adding waypoints to the file but most Photo-Taggers won't recognize theme correctly.

      Would hope for an fast answer

      Chris
    • Miller, Craig
      A track. On Sun, May 2, 2010 at 10:49 AM, christian.freisen
      Message 2 of 8 , May 2, 2010
        A track.

        On Sun, May 2, 2010 at 10:49 AM, christian.freisen <
        christian.freisen@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hi Folks,
        >
        > is there a "best way" for creating GPX-Files for adding Locations to
        > photos?
        > I tried with only adding waypoints to the file but most Photo-Taggers won't
        > recognize theme correctly.
        >
        > Would hope for an fast answer
        >
        > Chris
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Craig Miller
        Geospatial Software Architect


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Simon Slavin
        ... The standard called EXIF which is used for adding tags of all types to photos. It was originally invented for information to do with how the camera was
        Message 3 of 8 , May 2, 2010
          On 2 May 2010, at 6:49pm, christian.freisen wrote:

          > is there a "best way" for creating GPX-Files for adding Locations to photos?
          > I tried with only adding waypoints to the file but most Photo-Taggers won't recognize theme

          The standard called 'EXIF' which is used for adding tags of all types to photos. It was originally invented for information to do with how the camera was set up: aparture, flush, etc. but it has been extended to hold many other types of information including location information. Photo-geotagging is almost always done by adding EXIF information. Take a look at

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exchangeable_image_file_format#Geolocation

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geotagging#JPEG_photos

          and perhaps EXIF 2.2 at

          http://www.exif.org/specifications.html

          There's probably a pre-made library and command-line program for your platform which can be used to add extra tags to an existing image file. You just call it and feed it parameters.

          Simon.
        • christian.freisen
          Thanks for the answer but I think I misspell my meaning: I don t want to tag photos by myself. I only wanna create the gpx-files so that the users can decide
          Message 4 of 8 , May 3, 2010
            Thanks for the answer but I think I misspell my meaning:

            I don't want to tag photos by myself. I only wanna create the gpx-files so that the users can decide which application they use for tagging.

            I've tested this with waypoints only but most tagging-programs won't recognize them.



            --- In gpsxml@yahoogroups.com, Simon Slavin <slavins@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > On 2 May 2010, at 6:49pm, christian.freisen wrote:
            >
            > > is there a "best way" for creating GPX-Files for adding Locations to photos?
            > > I tried with only adding waypoints to the file but most Photo-Taggers won't recognize theme
            >
            > The standard called 'EXIF' which is used for adding tags of all types to photos. It was originally invented for information to do with how the camera was set up: aparture, flush, etc. but it has been extended to hold many other types of information including location information. Photo-geotagging is almost always done by adding EXIF information. Take a look at
            >
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exchangeable_image_file_format#Geolocation
            >
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geotagging#JPEG_photos
            >
            > and perhaps EXIF 2.2 at
            >
            > http://www.exif.org/specifications.html
            >
            > There's probably a pre-made library and command-line program for your platform which can be used to add extra tags to an existing image file. You just call it and feed it parameters.
            >
            > Simon.
            >
          • Dan Foster
            Hello, ... You can look at how EasyGPS creates GPX 1.1 with geotagged photos. http://www.easygps.com/download.asp -- Dan Foster
            Message 5 of 8 , May 3, 2010
              Hello,

              >> is there a "best way" for creating GPX-Files for adding Locations to photos?
              >> I tried with only adding waypoints to the file but most Photo-Taggers won't recognize theme

              You can look at how EasyGPS creates GPX 1.1 with geotagged photos.
              http://www.easygps.com/download.asp


              --
              Dan Foster
            • Alan
              Hi GPX Forum I m wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than one second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS device,
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 4, 2010
                Hi GPX Forum
                I'm wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than one
                second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS device,
                but it seems that the xsd:dateTime does not allow for decimals.
                Is this a subject already fully canvassed?
              • Dan Foster
                Hello, ... GPX allows decimal seconds, as does ISO 8601, on which GPX XML dateTime is based. Element: time Creation/modification timestamp for element. Date
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 4, 2010
                  Hello,

                  Thursday, November 4, 2010, 6:16:30 AM, Alan wrote:

                  >
                  > Hi GPX Forum
                  > I'm wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than one
                  > second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS device,
                  > but it seems that the xsd:dateTime does not allow for decimals.
                  > Is this a subject already fully canvassed?

                  GPX allows decimal seconds, as does ISO 8601, on which GPX' XML dateTime is
                  based.

                  Element: time

                  Creation/modification timestamp for element. Date and time in are in Univeral Coordinated Time (UTC), not local time! Conforms to ISO 8601 specification for date/time representation. Fractional seconds are allowed for millisecond timing in tracklogs.

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601
                  Decimal fractions may also be added to any of the three time elements. A decimal point, either a comma or a dot (without any preference as stated most recently in resolution 10 of the 22nd General Conference CGPM in 2003), is used as a separator between the time element and its fraction. A fraction may only be added to the lowest order time element in the representation. To denote "14 hours, 30 and one half minutes", do not include a seconds figure. Represent it as "14:30,5", "1430,5", "14:30.5", or "1430.5". There is no limit on the number of decimal places for the decimal fraction. However, the number of decimal places needs to be agreed to by the communicating parties.




                  --
                  Dan Foster
                • Alan
                  That gives me encouragement to investigate further, thanks. ... From: gpsxml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gpsxml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dan Foster Sent:
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 5, 2010
                    That gives me encouragement to investigate further, thanks.

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: gpsxml@yahoogroups.com [mailto:gpsxml@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    Dan Foster
                    Sent: Thursday, 4 November 2010 11:29 PM
                    To: Alan
                    Subject: Re: [gpsxml] Time stamps in GPX - decimal seconds

                    Hello,

                    Thursday, November 4, 2010, 6:16:30 AM, Alan wrote:

                    >
                    > Hi GPX Forum
                    > I'm wanting to analyse GPS track points with an accuracy higher than
                    > one second. Obviously the validity of the data will depend on the GPS
                    > device, but it seems that the xsd:dateTime does not allow for decimals.
                    > Is this a subject already fully canvassed?

                    GPX allows decimal seconds, as does ISO 8601, on which GPX' XML dateTime is
                    based.

                    Element: time

                    Creation/modification timestamp for element. Date and time in are in
                    Univeral Coordinated Time (UTC), not local time! Conforms to ISO 8601
                    specification for date/time representation. Fractional seconds are allowed
                    for millisecond timing in tracklogs.

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601
                    Decimal fractions may also be added to any of the three time elements. A
                    decimal point, either a comma or a dot (without any preference as stated
                    most recently in resolution 10 of the 22nd General Conference CGPM in 2003),
                    is used as a separator between the time element and its fraction. A fraction
                    may only be added to the lowest order time element in the representation. To
                    denote "14 hours, 30 and one half minutes", do not include a seconds figure.
                    Represent it as "14:30,5", "1430,5", "14:30.5", or "1430.5". There is no
                    limit on the number of decimal places for the decimal fraction. However, the
                    number of decimal places needs to be agreed to by the communicating parties.




                    --
                    Dan Foster



                    ------------------------------------

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