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URN's and other things

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  • DD
    In investigating the dozens of RFC s regarding URN s I am realizing the potential advantages and some of the pratfalls. Based on a suggestion of one of an
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 16, 2005
      In investigating the dozens of RFC's regarding URN's I am realizing
      the potential advantages and some of the pratfalls.

      Based on a suggestion of one of an aggregator company tech guy, I have
      been investigating the use of the <cite> tag to allow for citations
      for congressional legislation. I had been working on a
      tagging/namespace system for legislation previously. Examples below:

      <uscongress:legis-num><uscongress:congress>109</uscongress:congress>
      <uscongress:bill-type>H.R.</<uscongress:bill-type><uscongress:bill-num>
      1000</uscongress:bill-num><uscongress:bill-status>ih
      </uscongress:bill-status></uscongress:legis-num>


      <cite id="urn:congress.gov:legisnum:109hr1000ih">H.R. 1000</cite>

      I have found it relatively trivial to convert between the two. I have
      found some advantages to the <cite> tag in terms of understanding that
      the legislation is a document with a name. Either system allows for
      making links to related to the document and since there is no official
      online legislation (there is an existential understanding of what a
      bill is, printed versus electronic versus the cartoon version--"I'm
      only a bill, sitting here on Capitol Hill").

      The use of the ISBN URN for books seems to be coming (and necessary to
      stop the onslaught of commericially determined linking through
      Microsoft SmartTags and Google Toolbar links).

      The URN is likely to show up within Dublin Core tags including
      dc:identifier and dc:subject, as well as in id tags for <cite> and
      other CSS/JavaScript objects. This is as opposed to VCARD RDF
      dc:creator possibilities where more than a name is to be conveyed.

      Just some thoughts.
      Daniel
    • Joshua Tauberer / GovTrack
      ... is an HTML tag, btw, though that s not necessarily a problem. I just wanted to point it out. People often link to something they re citing, and
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 18, 2005
        DD wrote:
        > Based on a suggestion of one of an aggregator company tech guy, I have
        > been investigating the use of the <cite> tag to allow for citations
        > for congressional legislation.

        <cite> is an HTML tag, btw, though that's not necessarily a problem. I
        just wanted to point it out.

        People often link to something they're citing, and that might make an
        additional tag cumbersome, e.g.:

        <a href="..."><cite>H.R. 1: The Act</cite></a>
        or
        <cite><a href="...">H.R. 1: The Act</a></cite>

        Another idea is to tack on an attribute to an existing tag around the
        citation, e.g.:

        <a href="..." rdf:resource="URI">H.R. 1: The Act</a>

        If the citation isn't a link, a <span> tag could be used to host the
        attribute.

        --
        - Joshua Tauberer

        http://taubz.for.net

        ** Nothing Unreal Exists **
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