Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

identification of Flutausis as Cogaeanus

Expand Messages
  • dciurchea
    In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33 all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and famous rivers. For the Tisia flows
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 18 2:34 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      "In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33
      all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and
      famous rivers. For the Tisia flows through it on the
      north and northwest, and on the southwest is the great
      Danube. On the east it is cut by the Flutausis, a swiftly
      eddying stream that sweeps whirling into the Ister's
      waters. Within these rivers lies Dacia, encircled by the 34
      lofty Alps as by a crown." Jordannes:V
      (The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, by
      Jordanes, Translated by Charles C. Mierow
      http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809 : V)

      The name of the river should be Plautausis (i.e. in modern
      Romanian 'plutashi', eng. raftsmen).
      Indeed, this river which today starts in the mountains as Bistritza
      and later as Siret down to the Danube was used by raftsmen until
      1969 to convey timber down to Danube and therefore may be taken
      as "Plutashi">>Plauta(u)si(s), the border of Gepidia with Caucoensi.
      According to a decent map derived from Ptolemy
      (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg) the
      name of this river is "Cogaeonus", i.e. a name related to the Getic
      sacred mountain Kogaion.
      The term "koga" is used locally today as an insult for the
      strangers, foreigners (not in dictionaries); the official name is
      Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
      starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,
      since today there is a small ucrainean community there; perhaps in
      antiquity Starbon(7:3:5) was told about the "Kogaionon" the border.

      I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
      in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.
    • Frederick Louis Scoggins
      ... Once again the historian Jordanes was incorrect in identifying the Gepidae as German. Please stop using his flawed historical assumptions. They (the
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 18 11:45 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        dciurchea wrote:
        >
        > "In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33
        > all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and
        > famous rivers. For the Tisia flows through it on the
        > north and northwest, and on the southwest is the great
        > Danube. On the east it is cut by the Flutausis, a swiftly
        > eddying stream that sweeps whirling into the Ister's
        > waters. Within these rivers lies Dacia, encircled by the 34
        > lofty Alps as by a crown." Jordannes:V
        > (The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, by
        > Jordanes, Translated by Charles C. Mierow
        > http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809
        > <http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809> : V)
        >
        > The name of the river should be Plautausis (i.e. in modern
        > Romanian 'plutashi', eng. raftsmen).
        > Indeed, this river which today starts in the mountains as Bistritza
        > and later as Siret down to the Danube was used by raftsmen until
        > 1969 to convey timber down to Danube and therefore may be taken
        > as "Plutashi">>Plauta(u)si(s), the border of Gepidia with Caucoensi.
        > According to a decent map derived from Ptolemy
        > (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg
        > <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg>) the
        > name of this river is "Cogaeonus", i.e. a name related to the Getic
        > sacred mountain Kogaion.
        > The term "koga" is used locally today as an insult for the
        > strangers, foreigners (not in dictionaries); the official name is
        > Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
        > starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,
        > since today there is a small ucrainean community there; perhaps in
        > antiquity Starbon(7:3:5) was told about the "Kogaionon" the border.
        >
        > I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
        > in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > No virus found in this incoming message.
        > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        > Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.12.0/960 - Release Date: 8/18/2007 3:48 PM
        >
        Once again the historian Jordanes was incorrect in identifying the
        Gepidae as German. Please stop using his flawed historical assumptions.
        They (the Gepidae) were never of that stock but alleged to have been a
        remnant of the Sumerians. They (Gepidae) were destroyed by Trajan in the
        2d Century A.D. What remained of the ancient Dacians, the Gepidae were
        absorbed by the later Huns, Magyars and other Slavs. Here is a good
        scientific research project, examine the Gepidae DNA/RNA with present
        day Dacians, Bulgars and Romanians. Match with the DNA of Sumerians and
        see what the human genome says.

        Frederick Louis Scoggins
      • Wolfgang Franz
        Hi Frederick. You confuse the Gepidae with the Getae. Wolfgang Franz
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 19 8:53 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Frederick.

          You confuse the Gepidae with the Getae.


          Wolfgang Franz


          Am Sonntag, 19. August 2007 08:45 schrieb Frederick Louis Scoggins:
          > dciurchea wrote:
          > > "In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33
          > > all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and
          > > famous rivers. For the Tisia flows through it on the
          > > north and northwest, and on the southwest is the great
          > > Danube. On the east it is cut by the Flutausis, a swiftly
          > > eddying stream that sweeps whirling into the Ister's
          > > waters. Within these rivers lies Dacia, encircled by the 34
          > > lofty Alps as by a crown." Jordannes:V
          > > (The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, by
          > > Jordanes, Translated by Charles C. Mierow
          > > http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809
          > > <http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809> : V)
          > >
          > > The name of the river should be Plautausis (i.e. in modern
          > > Romanian 'plutashi', eng. raftsmen).
          > > Indeed, this river which today starts in the mountains as Bistritza
          > > and later as Siret down to the Danube was used by raftsmen until
          > > 1969 to convey timber down to Danube and therefore may be taken
          > > as "Plutashi">>Plauta(u)si(s), the border of Gepidia with Caucoensi.
          > > According to a decent map derived from Ptolemy
          > > (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg
          > > <http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg>) the
          > > name of this river is "Cogaeonus", i.e. a name related to the Getic
          > > sacred mountain Kogaion.
          > > The term "koga" is used locally today as an insult for the
          > > strangers, foreigners (not in dictionaries); the official name is
          > > Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
          > > starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,
          > > since today there is a small ucrainean community there; perhaps in
          > > antiquity Starbon(7:3:5) was told about the "Kogaionon" the border.
          > >
          > > I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
          > > in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >
          > > No virus found in this incoming message.
          > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          > > Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.12.0/960 - Release Date: 8/18/2007
          > > 3:48 PM
          >
          > Once again the historian Jordanes was incorrect in identifying the
          > Gepidae as German. Please stop using his flawed historical assumptions.
          > They (the Gepidae) were never of that stock but alleged to have been a
          > remnant of the Sumerians. They (Gepidae) were destroyed by Trajan in the
          > 2d Century A.D. What remained of the ancient Dacians, the Gepidae were
          > absorbed by the later Huns, Magyars and other Slavs. Here is a good
          > scientific research project, examine the Gepidae DNA/RNA with present
          > day Dacians, Bulgars and Romanians. Match with the DNA of Sumerians and
          > see what the human genome says.
          >
          > Frederick Louis Scoggins
          >
          >
          > You are a member of the Gothic-L list. To unsubscribe, send a blank email
          > to <gothic-l-unsubscribe@egroups.com>. Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Ingemar Nordgren
          Hi Frederick, ... the ... It is not only Jordanes as says so - also archaeology. See the examinations of prof. Jerzy Okulicz at the archaeological institute of
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 19 9:25 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Frederick,

            --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Frederick Louis Scoggins
            <scoggins3375@...> wrote:
            >

            > Once again the historian Jordanes was incorrect in identifying the
            > Gepidae as German. Please stop using his flawed historical assumptions.
            > They (the Gepidae) were never of that stock but alleged to have been a
            > remnant of the Sumerians. They (Gepidae) were destroyed by Trajan in
            the
            > 2d Century A.D. What remained of the ancient Dacians, the Gepidae were
            > absorbed by the later Huns, Magyars and other Slavs.

            It is not only Jordanes as says so - also archaeology. See the
            examinations of prof. Jerzy Okulicz at the archaeological institute of
            the university of Warszawa. Specially his diggings at Elblag/Elbing
            showing the beginning of the Gepidae in the Vistula delta.

            The ancient Dacians were instead the Getae.

            Here is a good
            > scientific research project, examine the Gepidae DNA/RNA with present
            > day Dacians, Bulgars and Romanians. Match with the DNA of Sumerians and
            > see what the human genome says.

            If you find Gepidic and Gothic and other types of DNA in Romania and
            Bulgaria it is quite natural as well as also Dacian, i.e. Getae, and
            Roman (could be a great lot of different origin) et c. Also Taifalic
            of course wether they were Germanic speaking ( as Heather suggests)
            or not (according to Wolfram).

            Sumerians is outside my ability to comment but it sure would be
            interesting to compare just for the sake of curiosity.

            Best
            Ingemar
          • ualarauans
            Hi, ... Gepidae were not German, but (East) Germanic. Jordanes was correct in identifying them as the closest kinsmen of the Goths. ... been a ... Perhaps you
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 19 12:34 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi,

              --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Frederick Louis Scoggins
              <scoggins3375@...> wrote:
              >
              > Once again the historian Jordanes was incorrect in identifying the
              > Gepidae as German.

              Gepidae were not German, but (East) Germanic. Jordanes was correct
              in identifying them as the closest kinsmen of the Goths.

              > Please stop using his flawed historical assumptions.
              > They (the Gepidae) were never of that stock but alleged to have
              been a
              > remnant of the Sumerians.

              Perhaps you would like to come up with some evidence in favor of
              this phantastic assumption?

              > They (Gepidae) were destroyed by Trajan in the
              > 2d Century A.D. What remained of the ancient Dacians, the Gepidae
              were
              > absorbed by the later Huns, Magyars and other Slavs.

              The Huns and the Magyars (Hungarians) are not Slavs if you
              understand the term as it ought to be understood properly, i.e. as a
              name covering peoples of different ethnic origin speaking IE derived
              Slavic languages. The language of the present day Hungarians is
              Finno-Ugric, brought into Central Europe by the Magyar tribes in the
              9-10th ct. CE. After their settling down in what is now Hungary
              ("Honfoglalas") they assimilated some Slavic and probably also
              Germanic speaking groups which had preceded them in that territory.
              Which doesn't make them Slavic nor Germanic, of course. What
              concerns the Huns, we still don't know exactly what language
              the "true Huns" did speak. In fact, the Huns were a collective name
              for all members of the Hunnish tribal union, be they Germanic
              (Ostrogoths, Gepidae, Heruls, Sciri), Iranian (Alans, Sarmatians) or
              of any other descent, including some proto-Slavs too, maybe. The
              language of Attila's court at least seems to have been Gothic. But
              little is certain here.

              > Here is a good
              > scientific research project, examine the Gepidae DNA/RNA with
              present
              > day Dacians, Bulgars and Romanians.

              There are no present day Dacians. Not since 4-5th ctt. CE. They were
              totally romanized soon after Trajan's conquest.

              > Match with the DNA of Sumerians and
              > see what the human genome says.

              I wonder where you would get a sample of the DNA of the Sumerians
              who became extinct several thousands of years ago. I read somewhere
              that some researchers found distinctive genes in Kuwait and were
              speculating that Kuwaitis are the genetic descendants of the
              Sumerians. But this I think is also far from being granted.

              > Frederick Louis Scoggins

              Ualarauans
            • ualarauans
              Hi, ... [...] ... The word is borrowed from Slavic (OCSl. nEmici) where it universally denotes German (from OCSl. nEm-u dumb , mute , originally a dumb
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 19 12:54 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi,

                --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "dciurchea" <dciurchea@...> wrote:
                >
                [...]
                > the official name is
                > Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
                > starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,

                The word is borrowed from Slavic (OCSl. nEmici) where it universally
                denotes German (from OCSl. nEm-u "dumb", "mute", originally "a dumb
                person" > "a non-Slavic speaker").

                > I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
                > in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.

                When Jordanes was writing Getica the Romanian language did not exist
                yet.

                Ualarauans
              • Decebal-Radu C
                recently a youtube channel contains a story : Navigatori care dispar, director Iancu Moscu, 1976 i.e. Sailors disappearing ,
                Message 7 of 9 , May 13, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  recently a youtube channel contains a story : "Navigatori care dispar, director Iancu Moscu, 1976" i.e. "Sailors disappearing",
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_DBWgGrrmU
                  which tells the story of raftsmen on Bistriza/Siret, the swifty river "whirling" into Danube. I identified this river as Iordanes' Flutausis because of Floating=lat.flutare i.e. the eng. rafting.

                  The bussiness dissapeared after the 1960's because of a dam, the Bicaz dam(http://www.neamt.ro/Date_gen/Bicaz/Lac_Izv_Muntelui.html).

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCRGL0gf4Fo
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmEIlGcBdLM&feature=related
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqLeN6xvW_0&feature=related



                  --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "dciurchea" <dciurchea@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > "In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33
                  > all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and
                  > famous rivers. For the Tisia flows through it on the
                  > north and northwest, and on the southwest is the great
                  > Danube. On the east it is cut by the Flutausis, a swiftly
                  > eddying stream that sweeps whirling into the Ister's
                  > waters. Within these rivers lies Dacia, encircled by the 34
                  > lofty Alps as by a crown." Jordannes:V
                  > (The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, by
                  > Jordanes, Translated by Charles C. Mierow
                  > http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809 : V)
                  >
                  > The name of the river should be Plautausis (i.e. in modern
                  > Romanian 'plutashi', eng. raftsmen).
                  > Indeed, this river which today starts in the mountains as Bistritza
                  > and later as Siret down to the Danube was used by raftsmen until
                  > 1969 to convey timber down to Danube and therefore may be taken
                  > as "Plutashi">>Plauta(u)si(s), the border of Gepidia with Caucoensi.
                  > According to a decent map derived from Ptolemy
                  > (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg) the
                  > name of this river is "Cogaeonus", i.e. a name related to the Getic
                  > sacred mountain Kogaion.
                  > The term "koga" is used locally today as an insult for the
                  > strangers, foreigners (not in dictionaries); the official name is
                  > Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
                  > starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,
                  > since today there is a small ucrainean community there; perhaps in
                  > antiquity Starbon(7:3:5) was told about the "Kogaionon" the border.
                  >
                  > I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
                  > in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.
                  >
                • OSCAR HERRE
                  i  would just like to imput something that maybe someone mite be more up to date on....im talking about the the ameican movie, conan the barbarian starring
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 16, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    i  would just like to imput something that maybe someone mite be more up to date on....im talking about the the ameican movie, conan the barbarian starring arnold swarzenegger......just curious, but how true is this movie.....if you follow it it says conan was like a celtic person, that was supposedly captured by germanic renegades and then let go by his captives.....so furthur into the movie conan and his friends are hired by this king named osiric, which im thinking is a gothic cheiftain, to rescue his daughter....also the friends of conan are of asian heritage which indicates this occurred in or around the black sea area, north of the balkans....any ideas about this movie....

                    --- On Sun, 5/13/12, Decebal-Radu C <dciurchea@...> wrote:


                    From: Decebal-Radu C <dciurchea@...>
                    Subject: [gothic-l] Re: identification of Flutausis as Cogaeanus
                    To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, May 13, 2012, 4:39 PM



                     



                    recently a youtube channel contains a story : "Navigatori care dispar, director Iancu Moscu, 1976" i.e. "Sailors disappearing",
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_DBWgGrrmU
                    which tells the story of raftsmen on Bistriza/Siret, the swifty river "whirling" into Danube. I identified this river as Iordanes' Flutausis because of Floating=lat.flutare i.e. the eng. rafting.

                    The bussiness dissapeared after the 1960's because of a dam, the Bicaz dam(http://www.neamt.ro/Date_gen/Bicaz/Lac_Izv_Muntelui.html).

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCRGL0gf4Fo
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmEIlGcBdLM&feature=related
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqLeN6xvW_0&feature=related

                    --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "dciurchea" <dciurchea@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > "In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33
                    > all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and
                    > famous rivers. For the Tisia flows through it on the
                    > north and northwest, and on the southwest is the great
                    > Danube. On the east it is cut by the Flutausis, a swiftly
                    > eddying stream that sweeps whirling into the Ister's
                    > waters. Within these rivers lies Dacia, encircled by the 34
                    > lofty Alps as by a crown." Jordannes:V
                    > (The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, by
                    > Jordanes, Translated by Charles C. Mierow
                    > http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809 : V)
                    >
                    > The name of the river should be Plautausis (i.e. in modern
                    > Romanian 'plutashi', eng. raftsmen).
                    > Indeed, this river which today starts in the mountains as Bistritza
                    > and later as Siret down to the Danube was used by raftsmen until
                    > 1969 to convey timber down to Danube and therefore may be taken
                    > as "Plutashi">>Plauta(u)si(s), the border of Gepidia with Caucoensi.
                    > According to a decent map derived from Ptolemy
                    > (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg) the
                    > name of this river is "Cogaeonus", i.e. a name related to the Getic
                    > sacred mountain Kogaion.
                    > The term "koga" is used locally today as an insult for the
                    > strangers, foreigners (not in dictionaries); the official name is
                    > Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
                    > starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,
                    > since today there is a small ucrainean community there; perhaps in
                    > antiquity Starbon(7:3:5) was told about the "Kogaionon" the border.
                    >
                    > I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
                    > in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.
                    >








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Decebal-Radu C
                    Hi, thanks for reading my post. I was serious about the identification of that river with Flutausis=Raftsmen, that s why I thought that films are relevant for
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 17, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi, thanks for reading my post.

                      I was serious about the identification of that river with Flutausis=Raftsmen, that's why I thought that films are relevant for the "RAFTSMANS'" concept for Flutausis.

                      Alike, I read your previous post on Qualis/Galtis as castle in Spain. I have no scholar reference on this observation of yours in this group. Galata in Constantinople is an example. I identified Galtis on Aucha as Galati on Aluta as today's Fagaras (of which the village Galati is a suburb); this is the only castle on Alutus(Olt)!

                      So, in the end, I take you seriously and I provide you with proofs !

                      I was convinced about these identifications I make after seeing in the tumulus at Cucuteni(Baiceni) the pillars told by Odin in Yinglinga for the chieftains and more, the antlers in the tomb of a "Sarmis Basileis" guy, said Fin the 6th(Fin is an ancestor of Odin in the sagas).

                      These are artefacts in museums in my town (Cluj-Napoca), where Vandals are supposed to have lived, according to Iordanes.

                      I try my best to provide the scholars in this list with genuine data and interpretations and I take you personally very seriously.

                      Now, after hundred of years of archeological and other scholar research we may have a better understanding, based on artefacts and scholar connexions, on the many theories about the migrations from around the Baltic towards Transilvania (where Cluj-Napoca should have therole of capital and has the largest museum and most of the "gepidic" tumuli).



                      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, OSCAR HERRE <duke.co@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > i  would just like to imput something that maybe someone mite be more up to date on....im talking about the the ameican movie, conan the barbarian starring arnold swarzenegger......just curious, but how true is this movie.....if you follow it it says conan was like a celtic person, that was supposedly captured by germanic renegades and then let go by his captives.....so furthur into the movie conan and his friends are hired by this king named osiric, which im thinking is a gothic cheiftain, to rescue his daughter....also the friends of conan are of asian heritage which indicates this occurred in or around the black sea area, north of the balkans....any ideas about this movie....
                      >
                      > --- On Sun, 5/13/12, Decebal-Radu C <dciurchea@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > From: Decebal-Radu C <dciurchea@...>
                      > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: identification of Flutausis as Cogaeanus
                      > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Sunday, May 13, 2012, 4:39 PM
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >  
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > recently a youtube channel contains a story : "Navigatori care dispar, director Iancu Moscu, 1976" i.e. "Sailors disappearing",
                      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_DBWgGrrmU
                      > which tells the story of raftsmen on Bistriza/Siret, the swifty river "whirling" into Danube. I identified this river as Iordanes' Flutausis because of Floating=lat.flutare i.e. the eng. rafting.
                      >
                      > The bussiness dissapeared after the 1960's because of a dam, the Bicaz dam(http://www.neamt.ro/Date_gen/Bicaz/Lac_Izv_Muntelui.html).
                      >
                      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCRGL0gf4Fo
                      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmEIlGcBdLM&feature=related
                      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqLeN6xvW_0&feature=related
                      >
                      > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "dciurchea" <dciurchea@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > "In the land of Scythia to the westward dwells, first of 33
                      > > all, the race of the Gepidae, surrounded by great and
                      > > famous rivers. For the Tisia flows through it on the
                      > > north and northwest, and on the southwest is the great
                      > > Danube. On the east it is cut by the Flutausis, a swiftly
                      > > eddying stream that sweeps whirling into the Ister's
                      > > waters. Within these rivers lies Dacia, encircled by the 34
                      > > lofty Alps as by a crown." Jordannes:V
                      > > (The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, by
                      > > Jordanes, Translated by Charles C. Mierow
                      > > http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14809 : V)
                      > >
                      > > The name of the river should be Plautausis (i.e. in modern
                      > > Romanian 'plutashi', eng. raftsmen).
                      > > Indeed, this river which today starts in the mountains as Bistritza
                      > > and later as Siret down to the Danube was used by raftsmen until
                      > > 1969 to convey timber down to Danube and therefore may be taken
                      > > as "Plutashi">>Plauta(u)si(s), the border of Gepidia with Caucoensi.
                      > > According to a decent map derived from Ptolemy
                      > > (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/macedonia_1849.jpg) the
                      > > name of this river is "Cogaeonus", i.e. a name related to the Getic
                      > > sacred mountain Kogaion.
                      > > The term "koga" is used locally today as an insult for the
                      > > strangers, foreigners (not in dictionaries); the official name is
                      > > Neamtz(usually denoting a german; the word is actually formed
                      > > starting from the root "neam"=stock), as an euphemism for foreigner,
                      > > since today there is a small ucrainean community there; perhaps in
                      > > antiquity Starbon(7:3:5) was told about the "Kogaionon" the border.
                      > >
                      > > I am glad to learn that the toponimic transcripted by Jordannes was
                      > > in fact genuine Romanian (i.e. Wallachian), as with Galtis on Alutha.
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.