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A word idea

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  • Fredrik
    Hi! I wonder if anyone knows the origin of the ending in OE geolca/geoloca (the origin of yolk)which is added to geolu = yellow. If so, does gothic have any
    Message 1 of 7 , May 24 3:31 AM
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      Hi!

      I wonder if anyone knows the origin of the ending in OE geolca/geoloca
      (the origin of yolk)which is added to geolu = yellow.
      If so, does gothic have any equivalent or could it be reconstructed?

      Might this ending be cognate to the one in russian belki and ukrainan
      bilok? These words mean protein and are made from bel- and bil- meaning
      white.

      Since dutch name protein eiwitten and german eiweiße a word made from
      the word white + the ending in OE geolca could create a word meaning
      egg white or protein. (OE hwítca?)

      You see where this is going?
      I'd like to find out a gothic word for protein made from this.

      /Fredrik
    • OSCAR HERRERA
      how about adahveitam.....ada- egg and hveitam- whites Fredrik wrote: Hi! I wonder if anyone knows the origin of the ending in
      Message 2 of 7 , May 24 9:04 AM
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        how about adahveitam.....ada- egg and hveitam- whites

        Fredrik <gadrauhts@...> wrote: Hi!

        I wonder if anyone knows the origin of the ending in OE geolca/geoloca
        (the origin of yolk)which is added to geolu = yellow.
        If so, does gothic have any equivalent or could it be reconstructed?

        Might this ending be cognate to the one in russian belki and ukrainan
        bilok? These words mean protein and are made from bel- and bil- meaning
        white.

        Since dutch name protein eiwitten and german eiweiße a word made from
        the word white + the ending in OE geolca could create a word meaning
        egg white or protein. (OE hwítca?)

        You see where this is going?
        I'd like to find out a gothic word for protein made from this.

        /Fredrik






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ualarauans
        Hi, I d agree about *addi-hveitei F.-n (or maybe *addja-?). I m not sure if the OE ending = Go. –ik-/-uk- as a diminutive suffix. If it was, then the Gothic
        Message 3 of 7 , May 25 3:26 AM
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          Hi,

          I'd agree about *addi-hveitei F.-n (or maybe *addja-?). I'm not sure
          if the OE ending = Go. –ik-/-uk- as a diminutive suffix. If it was,
          then the Gothic form for "yolk" could be *gilwika M.-a, and for "eye
          white" (and "protein"?) *hveitika M.-a. What I would argue with a
          little more assuredness is that Slavik –úk- (like in be/ilok) can
          not be cognate to the Germanic forms, save in the case it was
          borrowed from there. The 1st consonant shift forbids that. The
          Germanic match is probably Go. –(e)igs, -ags/-ahs; OE –ig, -eg.

          Ualarauans

          --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, OSCAR HERRERA <duke.co@...> wrote:
          >
          > how about adahveitam.....ada- egg and hveitam- whites
          >
          > Fredrik <gadrauhts@...> wrote: Hi!
          >
          > I wonder if anyone knows the origin of the ending in OE
          geolca/geoloca
          > (the origin of yolk)which is added to geolu = yellow.
          > If so, does gothic have any equivalent or could it be
          reconstructed?
          >
          > Might this ending be cognate to the one in russian belki and
          ukrainan
          > bilok? These words mean protein and are made from bel- and bil-
          meaning
          > white.
          >
          > Since dutch name protein eiwitten and german eiweiße a word made
          from
          > the word white + the ending in OE geolca could create a word
          meaning
          > egg white or protein. (OE hwítca?)
          >
          > You see where this is going?
          > I'd like to find out a gothic word for protein made from this.
          >
          > /Fredrik
        • llama_nom
          I m not sure about the etymology of the suffix either, but OE geolca is also attested as geoleca and geoloca , the latter being the more archaic form,
          Message 4 of 7 , May 25 4:56 AM
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            I'm not sure about the etymology of the suffix either, but OE 'geolca'
            is also attested as 'geoleca' and 'geoloca', the latter being the more
            archaic form, with -o- probably the adjective stem *w > *u > *o.

            > I'd agree about *addi-hveitei F.-n (or maybe *addja-?).

            Or *ai-hveitei or *addjis(a)-hveitei? The first = the root as
            inherited with no connecting vowel. The second would be an analogical
            formation, based on *addjis (thinking of Braune's observation that the
            old es/os-stems were all reinterpreted in Gothic as neuter a-stems).
            Maybe the best choice would be *addjis-hveitei, cf. sigis-laun.

            LN


            --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "ualarauans" <ualarauans@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > I'd agree about *addi-hveitei F.-n (or maybe *addja-?). I'm not sure
            > if the OE ending = Go. –ik-/-uk- as a diminutive suffix. If it was,
            > then the Gothic form for "yolk" could be *gilwika M.-a, and for "eye
            > white" (and "protein"?) *hveitika M.-a. What I would argue with a
            > little more assuredness is that Slavik –úk- (like in be/ilok) can
            > not be cognate to the Germanic forms, save in the case it was
            > borrowed from there. The 1st consonant shift forbids that. The
            > Germanic match is probably Go. –(e)igs, -ags/-ahs; OE –ig, -eg.
            >
            > Ualarauans
            >
            > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, OSCAR HERRERA <duke.co@> wrote:
            > >
            > > how about adahveitam.....ada- egg and hveitam- whites
            > >
            > > Fredrik <gadrauhts@> wrote: Hi!
            > >
            > > I wonder if anyone knows the origin of the ending in OE
            > geolca/geoloca
            > > (the origin of yolk)which is added to geolu = yellow.
            > > If so, does gothic have any equivalent or could it be
            > reconstructed?
            > >
            > > Might this ending be cognate to the one in russian belki and
            > ukrainan
            > > bilok? These words mean protein and are made from bel- and bil-
            > meaning
            > > white.
            > >
            > > Since dutch name protein eiwitten and german eiweiße a word made
            > from
            > > the word white + the ending in OE geolca could create a word
            > meaning
            > > egg white or protein. (OE hwítca?)
            > >
            > > You see where this is going?
            > > I'd like to find out a gothic word for protein made from this.
            > >
            > > /Fredrik
            >
          • ualarauans
            ... Of course, both are M.-an. Sorry. Ualarauans
            Message 5 of 7 , May 26 6:18 PM
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              --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "ualarauans" <ualarauans@...> wrote:
              >
              > ... the Gothic form for "yolk" could be *gilwika M.-a, and for "eye
              > white" (and "protein"?) *hveitika M.-a.

              Of course, both are M.-an. Sorry.

              Ualarauans
            • Fredrik
              ... addi-hveitei is good enough for egg white. I m not sure ... is this suffix a diminutive suffix? If it was, ... for eye ... Maybe hveitika could be used
              Message 6 of 7 , May 28 6:28 AM
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                --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "ualarauans" <ualarauans@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi,
                >
                > I'd agree about *addi-hveitei F.-n (or maybe *addja-?).

                addi-hveitei is good enough for egg white.

                I'm not sure
                > if the OE ending = Go. –ik-/-uk- as a diminutive suffix.

                is this suffix a diminutive suffix?

                If it was,
                > then the Gothic form for "yolk" could be *gilwika M.-a, and
                for "eye
                > white" (and "protein"?) *hveitika M.-a.

                Maybe hveitika could be used for protein then to have different words
                for protein and egg white.


                What I would argue with a
                > little more assuredness is that Slavik –úk- (like in be/ilok) can
                > not be cognate to the Germanic forms, save in the case it was
                > borrowed from there. The 1st consonant shift forbids that. The
                > Germanic match is probably Go. –(e)igs, -ags/-ahs; OE –ig, -eg.
                >

                I guessed so too, and I thought it couldve been a loan...maybe from
                gothic?


                /F
              • ualarauans
                ... I guess so. At least it seems to have been used in pet names alongside with –il- which is surely diminutive, cf. *Hildiko F. in Getica, also *Gibika M.
                Message 7 of 7 , May 28 6:11 PM
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                  --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Fredrik" <gadrauhts@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "ualarauans" <ualarauans@...>
                  wrote:
                  > >
                  > I'm not sure
                  > > if the OE ending = Go. –ik-/-uk- as a diminutive suffix.
                  >
                  > is this suffix a diminutive suffix?

                  I guess so. At least it seems to have been used in pet names
                  alongside with –il- which is surely diminutive, cf. *Hildiko F. in
                  Getica, also *Gibika M. (atta Gunþiharjis, Geislaharjis jah
                  Gudameris, kindine Baurgundjos, þaiei afar imma haihaitun jah
                  Gibikuggos), ON Bjarki = Go. *Bairika M. "little bear". There must
                  be more examples probably...

                  > What I would argue with a
                  > > little more assuredness is that Slavik –úk- (like in be/ilok) can
                  > > not be cognate to the Germanic forms, save in the case it was
                  > > borrowed from there. The 1st consonant shift forbids that. The
                  > > Germanic match is probably Go. –(e)igs, -ags/-ahs; OE –ig, -eg.
                  >
                  > I guessed so too, and I thought it couldve been a loan...maybe from
                  > gothic?

                  Or it could be cognate to Latin –icus and Greek –ikos? I don't know,
                  though.

                  Ualarauans
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