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Drus Griutinge (Augeis)

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  • llama_nom
    ... Goths. ... a name on –gais, something like Audagais or the like (cf. Andagis for *Andagais and a lot of other examples). And if really *Augeis, what
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 19, 2007
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      > > > Augeis kunjis "of Augis's kin"
      >
      > > Jordanes names 'Augis' among the early kings/ancestors of the
      Goths.
      > > Hence Augeis kuni = the Gothic people.

      > Yes, I saw that name in Getica, but I thought it was a distortion of
      a name on –gais, something like Audagais or the like (cf. Andagis
      for *Andagais and a lot of other examples). And if really *Augeis,
      what could it mean?

      Given the corruptions these names are liable to in transmission via
      Latin, you could be right about *Audagais. I took it the Gothic
      equivalent to ON -eygr "-eyed", i.e. having a certain kind of eyes, as
      in 'veðreygr skyti' "weather-eyed marksman" (that is, with his eye on
      the weather, concentrating on what might be coming). Adjectives which
      appear as ja/jo-stems in Gothic would seem to have gone over to the
      i-stem declension at an early time in North Germanic, before the
      different declensions fell together, cf. among the early runic
      inscriptions: glïaugiz uïu rnz "I, gleaming-eyed, hallow [these]
      runes" (Nebenstedt I bracteate); owlþuþewaz ni wajemariz (Torsbjerg
      chape). Unless, of course, Gothic was one that shifted them from the
      i- to the ja/jo declension... Maybe Augeis was nicknamed for his
      sharp-eyes or farsightedness (literal or figurative), or eyes that
      were distinctive in some other impressive way. Compare Isarnis, "the
      Iron Man"? Like Stalin's steely nickname. Cleasby/Vigfússon has Old
      Norse: eygir, m. one who frighten?, a terror [
      http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/html/oi_cleasbyvigfusson/b0135.html ] --
      good name for a king -- but apparently this is just an alternative
      spelling for Ægir [ http://www.septentrionalia.org/lex/index.php ], so
      probably neither "a terror" nor any relation to the Gothic name Augis.
      On the other hand, there are a lot of Old Norse personal names
      (originally nicknames?) with the suffix -ir = Go. eis < PG -ijaz, as
      well as some epithets for rules, such as 'hilmir'.
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