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Re: Using DNA to find Goths

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  • authurn2002
    ... Hi Sturla, Yes, please do keep us posted and I do wish you luck. One aspect I have been looking into is the Factor V Leiden mutation, a genetic blood
    Message 1 of 48 , Sep 11, 2006
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      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "sturlus" <sellingvaag@...> wrote:

      > I'll be
      > sure to keep everyone posted!
      >
      > Wish us luck!
      >
      > Sturla


      Hi Sturla,

      Yes, please do keep us posted and I do wish you luck.

      One aspect I have been looking into is the Factor V Leiden mutation, a
      genetic blood clotting disorder which has an interesting distribution.
      It can be passed by either males or females.

      FVL is thought to have a single origin in the near east between 21,000
      and 34,000 years ago and is thought to have spread into europe in the
      neolithic. It exists in the Lebanon, Syria, Cyprus etc at a frequency
      of between 12% and 14%. In Turkey its frequency is around 9%.

      Northern europe sees a gradient ranging from around 3% in the west to
      around 7% in the east. Southern Sweden however has a very high
      frequency of 15%, completely bucking the trend.

      The gradient decreases on a north to south axis but Hungary again has
      a high frequency of around 10%.

      There are interesting variations in Italy and Spain too. Though the
      frequencies here are much lower, around 3%, these tend to be in
      pockets in the north. FVL however is virtually absent amongst the
      Basques and North Africans, posing the question, who brought it into
      Iberia? There doesn't appear to have been much yDNA geneflow from the
      eastern mediterannean to the western mediterranean, the Balkans seem
      to have been a barrier to this. I don't know if there is any mtDNA
      info though.

      The spread of FVL in southern sweden is quite a puzzle. It is absent
      amongst saami and only exists at frequencies of around 2.5% in western
      Finland.

      Although it is a disorder, it does have some selective evolutionary
      advantages, increased resistance to sepsis or types of blood poisoning
      and lower blood loss from wounds or during childbirth.

      cheers

      authurn
      a resident of elmet
    • authurn2002
      ... Hi Sturla, Yes, please do keep us posted and I do wish you luck. One aspect I have been looking into is the Factor V Leiden mutation, a genetic blood
      Message 48 of 48 , Sep 11, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "sturlus" <sellingvaag@...> wrote:

        > I'll be
        > sure to keep everyone posted!
        >
        > Wish us luck!
        >
        > Sturla


        Hi Sturla,

        Yes, please do keep us posted and I do wish you luck.

        One aspect I have been looking into is the Factor V Leiden mutation, a
        genetic blood clotting disorder which has an interesting distribution.
        It can be passed by either males or females.

        FVL is thought to have a single origin in the near east between 21,000
        and 34,000 years ago and is thought to have spread into europe in the
        neolithic. It exists in the Lebanon, Syria, Cyprus etc at a frequency
        of between 12% and 14%. In Turkey its frequency is around 9%.

        Northern europe sees a gradient ranging from around 3% in the west to
        around 7% in the east. Southern Sweden however has a very high
        frequency of 15%, completely bucking the trend.

        The gradient decreases on a north to south axis but Hungary again has
        a high frequency of around 10%.

        There are interesting variations in Italy and Spain too. Though the
        frequencies here are much lower, around 3%, these tend to be in
        pockets in the north. FVL however is virtually absent amongst the
        Basques and North Africans, posing the question, who brought it into
        Iberia? There doesn't appear to have been much yDNA geneflow from the
        eastern mediterannean to the western mediterranean, the Balkans seem
        to have been a barrier to this. I don't know if there is any mtDNA
        info though.

        The spread of FVL in southern sweden is quite a puzzle. It is absent
        amongst saami and only exists at frequencies of around 2.5% in western
        Finland.

        Although it is a disorder, it does have some selective evolutionary
        advantages, increased resistance to sepsis or types of blood poisoning
        and lower blood loss from wounds or during childbirth.

        cheers

        authurn
        a resident of elmet
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