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Re: Spam

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  • Fredrik
    Today I think could also be himma daga . Good morning I usaly use godana maurgin (in analogy with german guten morgen), but god maurgin could perhaps work
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 14, 2006
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      Today I think could also be 'himma daga'.
      Good morning I usaly use godana maurgin (in analogy with german guten
      morgen), but god maurgin could perhaps work too.
      Tagl, I think mean hair. I don't know if it's all kinds of hair or just
      body hair...i think i once read in the gothic bible that a guy hade
      cloths of camel hair, and then the word tagl was used.
      A word for tail could be made from the root sterta-
      (http://runeberg.org/svetym/0961.html), but maybe this means butt
      instead, i dunno.
      Sail as noun is probably derived from pgmc segla- and in that case I'd
      guess the gothic word would be sigls and the verb perhaps siglan or
      smth like that.

      Mail: I have no good suggestion myself, but take a look at this:
      (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=mail&searchmode=none)
      "post, letters," c.1205, "a traveling bag," from O.Fr. male "wallet,
      bag," from Frank. *malha, from P.Gmc. *malho- (cf. O.H.G.
      malaha "wallet, bag," M.Du. male "bag"), from PIE *molko- "skin, bag."
      Sense extension to "letters and parcels" (18c.) is via "bag full of
      letter" (1654) or "person or vehicle who carries postal matter" (1654).
      In 19c. England, mail was letters going abroad, while home dispatches
      were post. Sense of "personal batch of letters" is from 1844,
      originally Amer.Eng. Mailman is from 1881; mail-order is from 1875. The
      verb is 1828, Amer.Eng. E-mail is from 1982, shortened from electronic
      mail (1977); this led to the contemptuous application of snail mail
      (1983) to the old system.

      Pail: The same thing here, no good suggestion, but look here:
      1392, from O.Fr. paielle "warming pan, liquid measure, bath," possibly
      from L. patella "small pan, dish," dim. of patina "broad shallow pan."
      O.E. had pægel "wine vessel," but etymology does not support a
      connection. This word is possibly from M.L. pagella "a measure," from
      L. pagella "column," dim. of pagina (see page (1)).
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