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Re: Reflexive with non-subject antecendent?

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  • llama_nom
    ... Not vinum sínum . ... http://www.ub.uu.se/arv/codex/faksimiledition/jpg_files/142lc1f.html ... themselves ... seems
    Message 1 of 28 , Feb 2, 2006
      Correction, this should read:

      > (2) ok mun enn sem fyrr eptir framaverk, at þér munuð laun hyggja
      > vinum *yðrum* fyrir sitt starf
      > "and, as always after glorious accomplishments, I expect you'll
      > think to reward your friends for their work"
      > (Ásmundar saga kappabana 3)

      Not 'vinum sínum'.




      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom" <600cell@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > (1) distahida mikilþuhtans gahugdai hairtins seinis
      > DIESCORPISEN hUPERHFANOUS DIANOIA KARDIAS AUTWN
      > he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts
      > (L 1,52)
      >
      > [
      >
      http://www.ub.uu.se/arv/codex/faksimiledition/jpg_files/142lc1f.html
      > ], see line 13.
      >
      > My question: Is there anything in the Greek original that would
      > explain this? (In spite of it being literally "of their heart",
      > AUTWN is clearly plural, isn't it? The use of a singular in such
      > contexts is also found in Icelandic and Old English.)
      >
      > If not, compare the following example of a reflexive with a non-
      > subject antecedent in Old Icelandic.
      >
      > (2) ok mun enn sem fyrr eptir framaverk, at þér munuð laun hyggja
      > vinum sínum fyrir sitt starf
      > "and, as always after glorious accomplishments, I expect you'll
      > think to reward your friends for their work"
      > (Ásmundar saga kappabana 3)
      >
      > And take a look at Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson `Old Icelandic: A Non-
      > Configurational Language?' NOWELE 26:3-29 [ http://www.hi.is/%
      > 7Eeirikur/ ], section 3.5. Could something similar be going on in
      > Gothic?
      >
      > The common factor in these examples seems to be that the noun
      > modified by the reflexive implies some action on the part of the
      > person it refers to. The implied action is obvious in the Old
      > Icelandic example 'starf' "work". Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson's examples
      > 16.a. and b. are both of this type. The noun 'gahugds', from the
      > verb hugjan `to think', implies the action of thinking or devising
      > plans on the part of the object. Alternatively, the
      > adjective 'mikiþuhtans' also implies an action, "thinking
      themselves
      > great", although explaining the action as implicit in the noun
      seems
      > more in keeping with the Icelandic examples.
      >
      > Or am I missing something much more obvious?
      >
      > Llama Nom
      >
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