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Genitive form

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  • Le Bateman
    Is the genitive ending is always the Genitive form in Gothic? Is it ever es like the Heafdes in Old English? Le [Non-text portions of this message have
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 17, 2005
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      Is the genitive ending is always the Genitive form in Gothic? Is it ever es like the Heafdes in Old English?
      Le

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • llama_nom
      ... Gothic? Is it ever es like the Heafdes in Old English? ... Nouns which have the genitive ending -is in the singular have a different genitive ending in
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 18, 2005
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        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Le Bateman" <LeBateman@A...> wrote:
        >
        > Is the genitive ending is always the Genitive form in
        Gothic? Is it ever es like the Heafdes in Old English?
        > Le


        Nouns which have the genitive ending -is in the singular have a
        different genitive ending in the plural. Some Greek names in the
        Gothic bible can have -es in the genitive singular, e.g. Iohannes.
        Native Gothic nouns fall into a number of categories, each category
        having its own set of endings. Not all of them have the genitive
        singular -is. See for yourself [
        http://www.oe.eclipse.co.uk/nom/nouns.htm ].

        N = Nominative
        A = Accusative
        G = Genitive
        D = Dative

        The Gothic scribes sometimes mix up the letters <ei> and <e> (and
        occasionally also <i>), in some sections of the bible more than
        others. It's possible that this could lead to a genitive singular
        written -es, where the original spelling would have had <ei>. I'm
        not sure if there is an example of that, but it wouldn't be
        surprising. Apart from such instances, I don't think any native
        Gothic noun would normally be spelt with <es> in the genitive
        singular. They wouldn't be listed this way in grammar books that
        use the regular spelling. Some people believe that <ai> represented
        the monophthong /E:/ [
        http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/index.html ] in unstressed
        positions such as the genitive singular ending -ais.

        Llama Nom
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