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Re: What kinda a was used?

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  • llama_nom
    Hi Fredrik, We ll probably never know the exact pronunciation, but my guess would be that there wasn t much difference in quality (if any) between short and
    Message 1 of 2 , May 21, 2005
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      Hi Fredrik,

      We'll probably never know the exact pronunciation, but my guess would
      be that there wasn't much difference in quality (if any) between short
      and long 'a', at least when the Gothic alphabet was divised in the 4th
      century. But clearly the alphabet was far from perfect as a record of
      the sounds of the language, and <ai> and <au> each represented
      multiple very different phonemes (judging by Latin spellings, <ai> at
      least was a diphthong at least in stressed syllables). So as far as I
      can see many varieties of German, English and Swedish long 'a' are
      possibilities. There wasn't any regular scribal confusion between
      long <a> and <au> believed to represent the long monophthong [O:].
      Nor was long <a> so open that scribes could confuse it with <ai>
      believed to represent the long monophthong [E:]. So anywhere between
      those boundaries is possible.

      http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/home.htm

      Llama Nom


      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Fredrik" <gadrauhts@h...> wrote:
      > I'd like to know if someone knows what kinda a that was used. It
      would
      > help me a lot with my pronunciation, eventhough I mostly read silent
      > and alone.
      >
      > In lack of knowledge I often use a inspiration from swedish.
      > That is, a long 'a' is pronounced "closed" as in english father.
      > And short 'a' is pronounced "open", almost as u in english cup.
      >
      > I also thought about a long open a as in german jahr, but it sounds
      > too german.
      >
      > /Fredrik
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