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Re: Neologisms Dictionary

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  • llama_nom
    ... Maybe -hliuþ, neuter a-stem, is better--even though the one attested example of this word is now thought to be a misreading, still it appears in some
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 5, 2005
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      > > bihliuþs - umlaut
      > > afhliuþs - ablaut
      > > afhliudatewa - ablaut series

      Maybe -hliuþ, neuter a-stem, is better--even though the one attested
      example of this word is now thought to be a misreading, still it
      appears in some dictionaries and would correspond to Norse hljo'ð.
      Basic meaning, paradoxical: "sound" or "silence"!

      Couple more suggestions:

      *inwageins "emotion"
      *uswageins "excitement"

      cf. the relevant verbs.

      j.s.fws. jah swa framwigis "and so on" (phrase actually
      attested "and so thenceforth"; framwigis "henceforth, thenceforth")
      = Icelandic j.s.fvs, og svo framvegis.

      ktl. (Gk, kai ta loipa) = jah laibos = etc. / et cetera, "and the
      rest..." (from the Skeireins)

      But too many abbreviation could get confused with numbers.

      Llama Nom





      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Fredrik" <gadrauhts@h...> wrote:
      >
      > Llama Nom
      >
      > Nice done...I just thought of this myself some days ago, and now I
      > wont need to think of this anymore :)
      > But I miss two words, one for 'gender' and one for 'case'.
      > I assume gender would be 'kunds' and case 'drusts', considering
      what
      > your words contain.
      > >
      > > Some suggestions for grammar words I thought of a while back;
      > assume
      > > asterisks everywhere except gumakunds "male",
      qinakunds "female",
      > > samaqiss "agreement":
      > >
      > > waihtiwaurd - noun
      > > tojawaurd - verb
      > > hvileikawaurd - adjective
      > > hvewaurd - adverb
      > > faurwaurd - pronoun
      > > frehawaurd - interrogative
      > > raþjawaurd - numeral
      > > particle - daili (or attested: drauhsna, gabruka, daila "piece
      of
      > > money, fellowship")
      > >
      > > gumakunds - masculine
      > > qinakunds - feminine
      > > nihvaþarakunds - neuter (half-calque on Latin)
      > >
      > > namnadrusts (nd.) - nominative
      > > þuladrusts (þd.) - accusative
      > > aiginadrusts (ad.) - genitive
      > > gibadrusts (gd.) - dative
      > > hvedrusts (hvd.) - intrumental
      > >
      > > afdrusts, ibdrusts?, halþs - oblique
      > >
      > > (Those owe a lot to Icelandic, except that they're nouns, but I
      > > picked *gibadrusts, rather than *nimadrusts for the sake of
      > > abbreviations, to avoid confusion over initials. Maybe the
      > > adjective of nominative could be a past participle
      *namnadrusans.)
      > >
      > > numel - present tense
      > > faurmel - past tense, preterite (cf. faur mel "before time, in
      > > advance"; faur "ago, past"; or like Icelandic *þanmel, but this
      > > would make it harder to translate Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's
      > Rainbow
      > > into Gothic...)
      > > anawairþamel - future tense
      > >
      > > spillamodei - indicative mood
      > > untriggwamodei - subjunctive
      > > = wiljamodei - optative
      > > tojastibna - active voice
      > > þulastibna - passive voice
      > >
      > > samaqiss - agreement
      > >
      > > relative particle - kunjando daili
      > > compund word - gagahaftiþ waurd
      > > conjunction - bindawaurd
      > >
      > > bihliuþs - umlaut
      > > afhliuþs - ablaut
      > > afhliudatewa - ablaut series
      > >
      > > Incidentally, has anyone noticed whether Gothic has any tendency
      to
      > > agree more with North or West Germanic in words of doubtful
      > gender?
      > > All the examples I can think of are unclear in Gothic, due to
      lack
      > > of attested forms: dal(s), biuþ(s), lubi/lubja.
      > >
      > > Llama Nom
      > >
      > >
      > > PS. here's something I discovered last night:
      > >
      > > http://www.dike.de/pfr-tischner/22-spr/ht-germ/krimgot.htm
      > >
      > > A "complete etymological dictionary of Crimean Gothic", with
      > > speculations on pronunciation.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "thiudans" <thiudans@y...>
      wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > My domain matthewcarver.com is in limbo right now... the old
      > credit
      > > > card it was drawing from expired and they were sending notices
      to
      > a
      > > > defunct email address. i'm waiting for another month i think.
      > > anyway i
      > > > still have the files on my storage disk. funny, i had
      forgotten
      > > about
      > > > stormloader until a few months ago. don't think i remember the
      > > > password or username for changing the files. :) i could repost
      > the
      > > old
      > > > neologisms i gathered from the first few hundred posts of this
      > > list if
      > > > you're interested...
      > > >
      > > > -Matthew
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > > Some other sources for neologisms:
      > > > >
      > > > > http://www.angelfire.com/goth/kuni/
      > > > > http://members.aol.com/yahyam/BagmeBloma.html
      > > > > http://www.stormloader.com/carver/gutrazda/
      > > > > http://matthewcarver.com/gutrazda/
      > > > >
      > > > > The last is Matthew's newer site, but unfortunately it
      doesn't
      > > seem
      > > > > to be working these days. It had some fun stuff composed by
      > > members
      > > > > of this list, long before I joined. His old site also has
      > > Tolkien's
      > > > > Bagme Bloma. (Re which: wagjand lindos seems more like it
      > ought
      > > to
      > > > > be "they shake lindens/shields?" than "...gently". And
      > > fraujinon
      > > > > takes dative, so: fraujinondei fairgunja -- which wrecks the
      > > rhyme
      > > > > scheme, I know...) There is a newer corrected version of
      Tim
      > > > > O'Neil's Wulfila Poem here:
      > > > >
      > > > > http://www.ancientsites.com/aw/Post/226178
      > > > >
      > > > > Llama Nom
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Fredrik" <gadrauhts@h...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Thanx...
      > > > > >
      > > > > > That seems to be a quite good idea, to collect neologisms
      > from
      > > > > > different persons...
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom"
      <600cell@o...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Excellent stuff, Fredrik!
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I just looked at the dictionary. When I have time I'll
      > > extract
      > > > > the
      > > > > > > approximately 20 neologisms from my English-Gothic
      > > dictionary
      > > > > for
      > > > > > > you. If this is okay with Francisc, it would be good to
      > > include
      > > > > > his
      > > > > > > creations and make a really big combined effort. >
      > > > > > > Llama Nom
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Fredrik"
      <gadrauhts@h...>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Llama Nom
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I totaly agree with anuþs instead of anuds. And with d
      in
      > > > > plural
      > > > > > > and
      > > > > > > > some cases in singular. The similarity with 'anus'
      that
      > > some
      > > > > > > > mentioned ain't that shocking. If I remember right
      that
      > > word
      > > > > > > > means 'ring', and what is shocking about that, (except
      > the
      > > > > > obvious
      > > > > > > > reason)?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I read the post 1223 and found that very interesting.
      A
      > > lot of
      > > > > > > those
      > > > > > > > words are similar to neologisms I "made" myself.
      > > > > > > > Such words as potato and strawberry are the same as I
      > > thought
      > > > > of.
      > > > > > > > I don't think I've seen any word for nut anywhere som
      > > guess it
      > > > > > > would
      > > > > > > > be like hnutus or something like that, (don't know
      which
      > > > > gender).
      > > > > > > To
      > > > > > > > continue the same way of making the words of potato
      and
      > > > > stawberry
      > > > > > > > with the word aírþa- as first part, I'd like to add
      the
      > > word
      > > > > > > > aírþahnutus as peanut. (swedish: jordnöt = peanut).
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > About the word for president 1223 had faursitands, and
      i
      > > > > thought
      > > > > > > of
      > > > > > > > faurasitands. Is faur better than faura in this case?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I have a list of neologisms (and some, maybe 5 non
      > > neologisms)
      > > > > if
      > > > > > > > some one is interested. I guess some are not that well
      > > done,
      > > > > cos
      > > > > > I
      > > > > > > > made em when I wasn't that good at this. But I hope
      you
      > > can
      > > > > tell
      > > > > > > me
      > > > > > > > corrections.
      > > > > > > > It's on a website that is:
      > > > > > > > http://www.geocities.com/gutiska/lex/neologism.html
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > /Fredrik
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "llama_nom"
      > > <600cell@o...>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Oscar,
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Ni ibnaleik ak galeik! ("Not equal, but similar", to
      > > > > paraphrase
      > > > > > > the
      > > > > > > > > Skeireins...) Ahaks "pigeon". Anaks "suddenly".
      But
      > > > > alright
      > > > > > > for
      > > > > > > > > alliteration, oh dear:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Nu skulum namnjan
      > > > > > > > > namna fugle,
      > > > > > > > > anuþ jah ahak,
      > > > > > > > > all þatei fliugiþ,
      > > > > > > > > hrabn hrukjandan,
      > > > > > > > > hraiwadubon,
      > > > > > > > > aran swaswe agatja,
      > > > > > > > > airþabundanana hanan.
      > > > > > > > > Gauros gansuns
      > > > > > > > > goljand sik uhtwon.
      > > > > > > > > Falka sa frija
      > > > > > > > > ufar fulþon galaiþ,
      > > > > > > > > unafswaggwiþs
      > > > > > > > > sweþauh waijiþ.
      > > > > > > > > Sparwan, sparwari
      > > > > > > > > bi spedistin qiþa.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Fredrik,
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Looks good to me. I'd wondered about this word ages
      > > ago,
      > > > > > before
      > > > > > > I
      > > > > > > > > had access to all these great dictionaries on the
      > > internet.
      > > > > I
      > > > > > > > can't
      > > > > > > > > remember what conclusion I reached, if any, but I
      > didn't
      > > > > know
      > > > > > > about
      > > > > > > > > the Lithuanian cognate then--which I think is what
      > > suggests
      > > > > an
      > > > > > i-
      > > > > > > > > stem. Makes a nice addition to our Gothic
      vocabulary!
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > The normal practice is to change -d to -þ at the end
      of
      > > a
      > > > > word
      > > > > > > or
      > > > > > > > > before -s, but sometimes the -d was written as
      such.
      > > E.g.
      > > > > gods
      > > > > > > &
      > > > > > > > > goþs both occur, and by chance the former is
      actually
      > > more
      > > > > > > common.
      > > > > > > > > Apparently such spellings are most often found in
      > > certain
      > > > > > > specific
      > > > > > > > > sections of the Bible, e.g. Luke's gospel.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Oh and on the subject of reconstructing vocabulary,
      you
      > > > > might
      > > > > > be
      > > > > > > > > interested in Post 1223, a very early message from
      > > Francisc
      > > > > > > which I
      > > > > > > > > came across recently. Especially the ingenious
      lists
      > of
      > > > > > > chemical
      > > > > > > > > and geographical terms.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > The Cleasby & Vigfusson Icelandic-English Dictionary
      > has
      > > > > some
      > > > > > > > > interesting comments on Gothic, including at least
      one
      > > > > probable
      > > > > > > > loan-
      > > > > > > > > word into Old Spanish, not listed in Koebler:
      > > > > *brano "heifer"
      > > > > > > > (young
      > > > > > > > > female cow) = OIc. brana.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > And finally, Francisc,
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Good work on the Crossword! I've added your
      guesses.
      > I
      > > > > hope
      > > > > > it
      > > > > > > > > isn't making anyone too cross yet...
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Llama Nom
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, OSCAR HERRERA
      > > > > <duke.co@s...>
      > > > > > > wrote:
      > > > > > > > > > waila,so waurd anaks(pigeons) samaleika ist...
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Fredrik <gadrauhts@h...> wrote:
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Hi all!
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > I don't do much so i think about words in gothic
      > which
      > > i
      > > > > > > cannot
      > > > > > > > > find
      > > > > > > > > > in any dicctionary. Now it's the gothic word for
      > duck.
      > > I
      > > > > have
      > > > > > > > > > searched for it in all dicctionaries I know about
      on
      > > > > internet
      > > > > > > but
      > > > > > > > > > without finding any so i took the freedom to
      recreate
      > > it
      > > > > > > instead.
      > > > > > > > > > I wonder if you think this is ok or if not.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > The word in swedish is 'and' (or in another
      > > form 'anka')
      > > > > and
      > > > > > > the
      > > > > > > > > > german is 'ente'. Acording to some books and
      > > dicctionaries
      > > > > > > (like
      > > > > > > > > > runeberg.org) this comes from *anuðiz.
      > > > > > > > > > I guess this would have been 'anuds' in gothic,
      and
      > an
      > > i-
      > > > > stem.
      > > > > > > > > > The icelandic önd and the german ente is both
      > feminine
      > > so
      > > > > > > > > therefore
      > > > > > > > > > I guess the gothic word also is feminine.
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Comments please!
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > > /Fredrik
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
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