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Re: Some more odd strong verb endings ?

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  • llama_nom
    Hi Ted, NIMANDANS is the present participle of NIMAN to take , with the masculine nominative (=accusative) plural, see Wright para. 239. It means taking
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 1, 2005
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      Hi Ted,

      NIMANDANS is the present participle of NIMAN "to take", with the
      masculine nominative (=accusative) plural, see Wright para. 239. It
      means "taking" and is declined like an adjective (but see Wrighht
      for the details). You didn't find it in para. 286 because it's only
      given there in the masculine singular form, which is just the
      conventional way adjectives are listed in dictionaries, etc.

      The present participle ending -AND- is common to all verbs strong
      and weak, with the exception of Class 2 weak, which have -OND-.
      (Class 1 weak verbs have -JAND-, Class 4 -NAND-. Strong verbs
      simply add -D- to the infinitive.)

      The forms you cite which end in -AN- are past partiple endings of
      strong verbs (also called "preterite participle"), see Wright 241 --
      they can be declined as weak or strong adjectives, according to the
      same rules as other adjectives. For example: NUMANS "taken",
      HAITANS "called". Some made up examples:

      IK NUMANS WAS "I was taken"
      ÞAI NUMANAI WESUN "they were taken"

      ÞO NUMANANONA USGIBANA WESUN "those things [which were] taken have
      been paid back"

      I'm not sure how well I explained that, so please let me know if
      it's still confusing, or if you have any more questions.

      Llama Nom





      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "AIFoundations.org"
      <AIFoundations@z...> wrote:
      >
      > I have come across about 200 of these in the extant Gothic
      literature.
      > Some of these are found across a number of verbs while others are
      > probably just unique to a certain verbs.
      >
      > Anyone have thoughts on this? Again, I can't find anything in the
      > literature to describe this so I feel I must be missing something
      > obvious. Presumably most of these are for present/active/indicative
      > verb forms.
      >
      > -andans
      > -andam
      > -ana
      > -ano
      > -andei
      > -andeins
      > -andan
      > -andein
      > -ando
      > -andane
      > -andona
      > -andeim
      > -andin
      > -andins
      > -anai
      > -anona
      > -anane
      > -anans
      > -anon
      > -anana
      > -anam
      > -anos
      > -andeino
      > -anis
      >
      > --
      > Ted Karas
      > AIFoundations.org
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