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Why German has no future tense

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  • jdm314@aol.com
    http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000521.html (though he s a bit confused- Proto-Indo-European is normally said to have no future tense
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 2 1:16 PM
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      http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000521.html

      (though he's a bit confused- Proto-Indo-European is normally said to have no
      future tense either)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gerald baker
      Would any of you be able to give me an e-mail address for Jack Hitt, who wrote the New York Times article that started this discussion. I wonder if he s a son
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 2 1:33 PM
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        Would any of you be able to give me an e-mail address
        for Jack Hitt, who wrote the New York Times article
        that started this discussion. I wonder if he's a son
        or other relative of Dick Hitt, who had a column in
        the Dallas News, back in 1965. He mentioned me in his
        column a couple of times, in regard to what I was
        doing with the Shaw Phonetic Alphabet at that time.

        Thanks,
        Gerald Baker




        --- jdm314@... wrote:
        >
        http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000521.html
        >
        > (though he's a bit confused- Proto-Indo-European is
        > normally said to have no
        > future tense either)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been
        > removed]
        >
        >


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      • sollersuk
        ... to have no ... I agree, he is a bit confused. Tenses in European languages are very fluid things, and if you look very closely at endings even in Latin
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 29 11:18 AM
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          --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, jdm314@a... wrote:
          > http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000521.html
          >
          > (though he's a bit confused- Proto-Indo-European is normally said
          to have no
          > future tense either)
          >
          I agree, he is a bit confused. Tenses in European languages are very
          fluid things, and if you look very closely at endings even in Latin
          and Greek you can see the ghosts of what look like auxiliary verbs
          stuck onto the end. Italian went through the cycle again.

          French has a nice definite future tense, and uses it to a
          considerable extent when referring to past events that are in the
          future with respect to even earlier events.

          Literary Welsh uses the same tense for present and future, but
          colloquially uses "bydd yn mynd" (to be going to) to express future -
          either a borrowing from or parallel development with English, which
          is prone to use that construction as much, if not more, than "will"
          and "shall".

          Come to think of it, the French use "aller" as an auxiliary to
          express the future pretty often as well.
        • Daniel Hicken
          ... A very prolific tense system, past, present and future. ... That s used to express the imminent future, as in within the next five minutes to a couple
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 30 6:39 AM
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            --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "sollersuk" <sollers@p...> wrote:
            > SNIP! <
            > French has a nice definite future tense, and uses it to a
            > considerable extent when referring to past events that are in the
            > future with respect to even earlier events.

            A very prolific tense system, past, present and future.

            > Come to think of it, the French use "aller" as an auxiliary to
            > express the future pretty often as well.

            That's used to express the imminent future, as in within the next five
            minutes to a couple hours, so, 'je vais aller au marché' I'm going to
            go to the market.

            (Just throwing in my two bits. :) )

            Cheers

            Daniel
          • sollersuk
            ... five ... to ... And a bit wider as well, with a feeling of intent - Je vais me marier ; I would only expect Je me mariera with a date, even a fairly
            Message 5 of 6 , May 9, 2004
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              >
              > > Come to think of it, the French use "aller" as an auxiliary to
              > > express the future pretty often as well.
              >
              > That's used to express the imminent future, as in within the next
              five
              > minutes to a couple hours, so, 'je vais aller au marché' I'm going
              to
              > go to the market.
              >
              > (Just throwing in my two bits. :) )
              >
              > Cheers
              >
              > Daniel

              And a bit wider as well, with a feeling of "intent" - "Je vais me
              marier"; I would only expect "Je me mariera" with a date, even a
              fairly vague one.
            • ashley overs
              thanks ... _________________________________________________________________ Add photos to your messages with MSN Premium. Get 2 months FREE*
              Message 6 of 6 , May 10, 2004
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                thanks


                >From: "sollersuk" <sollers@...>
                >Reply-To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                >To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Why German has no future tense
                >Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 16:18:33 -0000
                >
                >
                > >
                > > > Come to think of it, the French use "aller" as an auxiliary to
                > > > express the future pretty often as well.
                > >
                > > That's used to express the imminent future, as in within the next
                >five
                > > minutes to a couple hours, so, 'je vais aller au march�' I'm going
                >to
                > > go to the market.
                > >
                > > (Just throwing in my two bits. :) )
                > >
                > > Cheers
                > >
                > > Daniel
                >
                >And a bit wider as well, with a feeling of "intent" - "Je vais me
                >marier"; I would only expect "Je me mariera" with a date, even a
                >fairly vague one.
                >

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