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[gothic-l] Re: Learning Gothic: 1

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  • Jay Bowks
    From: Oleg S. And a question: as far as I know, the Gothic population in Crimea was of Visigoth origin, and I was sure that the Goths in Spain were Ostgoths...
    Message 1 of 45 , Jul 2, 1999
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      From: Oleg S.
      And a question: as far as I know, the Gothic population in Crimea was of
      Visigoth origin, and I was sure that the Goths in Spain were Ostgoths... I
      know that Goths and their close relatives (Vandals, Burgundians) inhabited
      vast areas in Europe and Africa... Can anybody help me with a link to a
      complete information about the Gothic history?


      Hi Oleg, good to see you on the list.... about the Visigoths, these were the
      Western Goths... they went in and down into Spain. A lot of Spanish
      surnames show gothic descent. The "Ostrogoths" invaded Italy. The
      Vandals too influenced Spain... giving the name to "Andalusia".

      About the other two questions I'll try to look up some references and
      see if I find something that may help.

      Since,
      ILVI
      jjbowks@...
      jjbowks@...
      ilvi@...
    • jdm314@aol.com
      jdm31-@aol.com wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/gothic-l/?start=836 ... ideas. ... (*@#$Belgium! -- ... Tolkein? Adams? All this and
      Message 45 of 45 , Sep 10, 1999
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        jdm31-@... wrote:
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/gothic-l/?start=836

        > Here's a revised list of proposals, with corrections and some new
        ideas.
        > I haven't added any of the new names yet, except Belgium.
        (*@#$Belgium! --
        > that's a Hitchhiker's Guide joke, in case anyone cares).

        Tolkein? Adams? All this and lengthly, highly useful posts on reviving
        GOTHIC? YOu're my hero. Of course this probably also means you have no
        life ;)


        >
        > It seems that Wulfila didn't like having placenames (of cities
        anyway)
        > ending in -us or -um, and he changed them to -o (weak feminine):
        Ephesus >
        > Aifaiso, Iconium > Eikaunio. I've done the same with Cyprus,
        Aegyptus.

        Hm, this does explain some of the weirder placenames I stumbled on in
        Wright back when I was trying to figure out how to borrow Greco-Latin
        second declension neuters into Gothic.
        So IS there a regular way to do that? That would be REALLY useful to
        know, especially if we want to talk about Cesium or something. The only
        non-toponymic one I know is praitoriaun, which I have no idea how to
        decline. [Praitoriaun incidentally is a great way to render "police
        station"]


        > Estonia Estiland Estisks Estisks

        You may want to take Tacitus' Aestii into account here!

        -├Ćusteinus
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