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Re: Vladimir

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  • brugerfejl
    Hi, Just to the origin of Valdemar/Vladimir. To my best knowledge Valdemar is not a norse name, in Scandinavia I think the common opinion is that it derives
    Message 1 of 33 , Aug 25, 2003
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      Hi,
      Just to the origin of Valdemar/Vladimir.
      To my best knowledge Valdemar is not a norse name, in Scandinavia I
      think the common opinion is that it derives from Vladimir and not
      the other way round. I have not heard that Valdemar was in use
      before the 12 century and often as name for kings or powerful men.
      Probably the vikings travelling east must have known that Vladi
      meant 'to rule' anyway Valdemar would be an perfect name to
      a 'scandinavian' king as Vald meant power, dominion, violence. A
      norse word 'valdmaĆ°r' did exist but as far as I know only for naming
      a 'public officer/ authority' or whatever that would be in english...

      Cheers
      Lars
    • Ingemar Nordgren
      ... Hi Vladimir, Since my own doctoral competence also is in history, even if my dissertation also covered archaeology, linguistics, history of religion and
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 26, 2003
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        Vladimir wrote:
        > I have come across the word "bo"
        > with a similar assumed meaning
        > in the book by Gleb Lebedev
        > "The Viking Age In Northern Europe"
        > (in Russian). But Lebedev is a historian,
        > not a linguist. Some linguistic and
        > etymologic comments on the medieval
        > "bo" in Swedish would be desirable.
        > However, your support leaves chance
        > to survive for my "bo jarl".
        > Vladimir
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


        Hi Vladimir,

        Since my own doctoral competence also is in history, even if my
        dissertation also covered archaeology, linguistics, history of
        religion and science of arts, I am not enough specialised to make a
        real etymological derivation. I can however say that the combination
        bo-jarl is quite convincing and normal linguistically and
        historically, even if I have not seen the combination before. It fits
        quite well into known facts in Sweden anyhow.

        Best
        Ingemar
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