Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [gothic-l] Vladimir

Expand Messages
  • Егоров Владимир
    Dear Francisc, you remind me again commonly accepted conventional representations on both Tervingi and Vladimir . I am sincerely grateful to you, but I
    Message 1 of 33 , Aug 25, 2003
      Dear Francisc,
      you remind me again commonly accepted conventional
      representations on both 'Tervingi' and 'Vladimir'.
      I am sincerely grateful to you, but I search just
      nonconventional explanations.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />



      The ethnonym 'Tervingi' is found in Roman documents
      rather than in old German scripts. How can we be
      absolutely sure that this ethnonym had Gothic (German)
      origin? For instance, as a curious thing, 'terv' in
      the Finnish language means 'resin, pitch, tar, rosin'.
      Further, in the Russian language, the same word is
      'smola'. And now we have a parallel 'tervingi'-'smolyane'
      (also an old Slavic tribe, inhabitants of Smolensk)
      rather than 'tervingi'-'drevlyane'. Or maybe 'drevlyane'
      and 'smolyane' were the same? At least those were
      neighbors. No, I do not state 'tervingi' being derivative
      from Finnish 'terva', Lord forbid! But I would not
      exclude a priori any version whatever mad should it seem.



      As such a "mad version", I consider the stem of 'Greutungi'
      to be 'hroed', 'hroeth'. Of course, you can laugh. However-
      The Latin language did not have tradition to show the
      aspiration before a consonant (as opposed to the old Greek).
      The aspiration could be either lost (compare Tacitus'
      'reudignii') or replaced by 'g'. The diphthong 'eu' was
      usually applied in Latin to represent the o-umlaut
      (I refer here to the same Hungarian Anonym written in
      an exaggeratedly correct Latin) where Hungarian 'eloed'
      (with o-umlaut, Eng. 'ancestor') is given as 'eleud'. So,
      treating 'Greutungi' as 'Hroedungi' might be not so mad.
      Then, if we should admit for a moment this possibility,
      we could make a next step. As far as I can judge, in Gothic
      'hroed', 'hroeth' means something like 'famous, glorious,
      renowned'. But a Russian word for these notions is 'slavnyj'
      with the stem 'slav'. Or 'Slav'? Is not the ethnonym 'Slav'
      a Slavic calque of Gothic 'hroed', 'hroeth', i.e. 'Greutungi'?



      All this looks ridiculous. And it is ridiculous, but on
      a single condition: if 'Tervingi' does not mean anything like
      'famous, glorious, renowned' in some other language. The
      Geto-Dacian language seems a best candidate for these purposes.



      And returning to 'Vladimir'. You stated

      "This makes more plausible the connection of Slavic "vlad-" rather
      to the Germanic "wald-" than to "hlud-"".

      You would be right should Vladimir be a title. But it was a name.
      The component 'Wald', though relevant to titles, was unproductive
      in old Germanic names while 'Hloed(r)' is very typical for them.



      Best regards,

      Vladimir



      ********






      -----Original Message-----
      From: Francisc Czobor [mailto:fericzobor@...]
      Sent: Monday, August 25, 2003 1:06 PM
      To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [gothic-l] Vladimir


      Hi, Vladimir,

      a little completion to my previous message, regarding your first name:
      the Slavic root vlad- has the same significance like the Germaic root
      wald-: "to rule" (Russian: vladit', Gothic: waldan, German: [ver-]
      walten). But the Old Germanic root *hludh-/*hluth- (found, as you
      said, also in Hloedr and Lotar) means "renowned, famous", and
      also "loud", being derived from the Indo-European root *kleu-/*klu-
      "to hear, listen" (the source, inter alia, also of the Russian verbs
      slushat'/slyshat' and the noun slukh). This makes more plausible the
      connectin of Slavic "vlad-" rather to the Germanic "wald-" than
      to "hlud-".

      Francisc



      Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

      ADVERTISEMENT
      <http://rd.yahoo.com/M=259538.3760361.5018013.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705297328:HM/A=1712983/R=0/SIG=11u38u3s2/*http://hits.411web.com/cgi-bin/hit?page=1374-105951838331032> click here
      <http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=259538.3760361.5018013.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=:HM/A=1712983/rand=866325897>

      You are a member of the Gothic-L list. To unsubscribe, send a blank email to <gothic-l-unsubscribe@egroups.com>.

      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ingemar Nordgren
      ... Hi Vladimir, Since my own doctoral competence also is in history, even if my dissertation also covered archaeology, linguistics, history of religion and
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 26, 2003
        Vladimir wrote:
        > I have come across the word "bo"
        > with a similar assumed meaning
        > in the book by Gleb Lebedev
        > "The Viking Age In Northern Europe"
        > (in Russian). But Lebedev is a historian,
        > not a linguist. Some linguistic and
        > etymologic comments on the medieval
        > "bo" in Swedish would be desirable.
        > However, your support leaves chance
        > to survive for my "bo jarl".
        > Vladimir
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


        Hi Vladimir,

        Since my own doctoral competence also is in history, even if my
        dissertation also covered archaeology, linguistics, history of
        religion and science of arts, I am not enough specialised to make a
        real etymological derivation. I can however say that the combination
        bo-jarl is quite convincing and normal linguistically and
        historically, even if I have not seen the combination before. It fits
        quite well into known facts in Sweden anyhow.

        Best
        Ingemar
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.