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Gothic names

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  • ?????? ????????
    Hi, Troels! Thank you for the exhaustive anthology regarding Hrothwulf, even if my gratitude reaches you with a week delay. Unfortunately, the series for
    Message 1 of 49 , Jan 27, 2003
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      Hi, Troels!

      Thank you for the exhaustive anthology regarding Hrothwulf,
      even if my gratitude reaches you with a week delay.

      Unfortunately, the series for Hrothrik was shorter.
      Except for Beowulf (I just reconstructed *Hrothrik from
      Beowulf’s HROTHmund + hredRIK) you mentioned Saxon’s
      Röric (Roeric) and compared this form with HraerekR
      of the sagas as “synonymous”. Identity of “Roeric” and
      “HraerekR” is very important for me. First, this allows me
      to extend identifying HraithmaraR of the Roekstone
      with Hroth-mara that is the Black sea as “Russian-sea”
      (naturally if the supposition, BTW prompted by you, on
      derivation of the ethnonym “Rus” from Gothic “hroth” is true).
      Second, this corroborates my assumption that Rurik of
      the Initial Russian Chronicle was neither “knyaz’ Rurik”
      nor “konung Roeric of Jutland/Frisland” but merely
      a personification of Russian kagans (chacans, hacons)
      i.e. Russian rulers, i.e. Hroth-riks. In particular,
      the Initial Chronicle personifies the same way the Russian
      "priestly chieftains", i.e. hölgi, as “knyaz’ Oleg”,
      and the Khazar kagans as “knyaz’ Kagan”.

      (I realize that all this sounds for you as a drivel
      and I have no intentions to impose on you my considerations,
      which are far enough from Gothic problems, but believe
      that I have some serious reasons for them, and I'm not
      wasting your time in vain.)

      Vladimir
    • o_cossue
      Really interesting. There are just a handful of Germanic names with an initial sigis- theme (according to Förstemann 1900: Sigisbert, Sigisfrid, Sigismeres,
      Message 49 of 49 , Dec 14, 2015
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        Really interesting. There are just a handful of Germanic names with an initial sigis- theme (according to Förstemann 1900: Sigisbert, Sigisfrid, Sigismeres, Sigismund, Sigistricus, Sigisvulth) I can add a Sigesgundia in Galicia in 887), but there are plenty of them with just *segi-, and also with *ses/sis- (including Galician medieval names Sisulfus, Sisericus, Sisvaldus... and Sisuldus, Sisina, Sesinus, Sisilo, Sisbertus, Sesgundia, etc.) So I think that your reasoning can be also applyied to the identification of *sis- as a variant of *sigis-.



        Now, on Rosamunda, etc, the element Maur- present in Maurila was probably taken from Latin Maurentius; Flor- in Floresindus from Florentius (flos ‘blossom’, and so 'to grow, prosper'); Cresc- in Crescemirus from Crescentius (crescere ‘to grow’); fortis in Fortesindus and Gundifortis is Latin fortis ‘strong’... So Rosamunda/Rosemudus can be related to Rosalia, Rosula or Rosina, but there are alternative Germanic etymologies (I concede that they are too many and probably too weak).


        Regards,

        Miguel Costa

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