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[gothic-l] Re: Computer as more than a person who computes

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  • Tomas Mac an Chrosain
    Is there a word for abacus (counting board) in any of the Gothic vocabularies? Perhaps an equivalent word for a calculator and, by extension, computer could
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 25, 1999
      Is there a word for abacus (counting board) in any of the Gothic
      vocabularies? Perhaps an equivalent word for a calculator and, by
      extension, computer could have already existed by whatever the abacus
      was called in Gothic.
      BTW, do any glosses exist in Gothic? I mean the marginal notes written
      to translate words from another language into Gothic? A lot of Old
      Irish exists in the form of glosses on other texts.
      Mediaeval European accountants used the abacus or "counting board"
      before algorithmic arithmetic was brought from the adoption of
      Hindu-Arabic numerals. The Goths were probably using this method or
      using talltsticks during the time that their culture flourished. Ancient
      Scandinavians were using tallysticks. Of course, this is a far cry from
      a computer, but they all kind of relate don't they (i.e. in the
      continuum of tools used for calculating)?
      Or, take the word for accountant and replace the male/female gender with
      the neuter ending??
      The Norse word mentioned earlier looks like it could be related to the
      English word toll and tally.
      Tomas
      Jay Bowks wrote:
      >
      > JDM wrote:
      > > This is a great idea! I love your attention to detail here.
      > > Unfortunately it won't work. It so happens that among the modern
      > >Latinist comunity (Haw haw haw! What a bunch of nuts! Trying to revive
      > >a dead language like Latin! It's so obscure!) there's a lot of debate
      > >about how to say computer. No one who knows what they're doing
      > >seriously suggests _computator_ though, as this would mean "man who
      > >professionally calculates", and a computer is not a man.
      >
      > The term "computer" was originally a person who confirmed
      > or made sure computations were accurate. There is a funny
      > anecdote where Einstein is sure of a formula he had just
      > come out with and impatiently could hardly wait for his
      > computer to confirm the findings. The term "computator"
      > is accepted by the IALA, and has been in the Interlingua-
      > English Dictionary since 1951.
      >
      > To recap, basing a Neo-Gothic term on the basis of "computer"
      > is actually well supported.
      >
      > In Spanish, (which ic more heavily influenced by the Goths,
      > i.e. Visi-Goths, than other romance langs :-) the word
      > computer is "computadora" or "ordenador" and the person
      > who computes is a "computador" (notice the absent female
      > ending -a ;-)
      >
      > Since,
      > ILVI
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