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Gundestrup and Thracia

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  • Bertil Haggman
    Students of Thracian art have been especially interested in the Gundestrup cauldron. They have attempted to refine the dating and extending the range of
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 21, 2002
      Students of Thracian art have been especially interested
      in the Gundestrup cauldron. They have attempted to
      refine the dating and extending the range of cultural
      materials to which the cauldron was compared.

      The conclusion was that the cauldron had been made either
      in Transsylvania or the adjacent lower Danube basin. These
      regions were in a flux in the late Iron Age. There was for instance
      "Celtic" raiding around 280 BC and the establishment of the
      kingdom of Tylis in what is today Bulgaria. After the cauldron was
      made Germanic raids took place. It was believed that Goths, Celts,
      Thracians had played a role in the history of the cauldron.

      Phaleras or bridle decorations, that were used to repair the cauldron
      were also in use by the Sarmatians and the similarities between the Gundestrup
      one and those found in the lower Don area are striking. The "elephant and
      castle" phalera is similar to two phaleras from a North Pakistani
      site near Rawalpindi.

      One Rawalpindi phalera depicts a woman with her hair in tresses
      and a bird perched above each shoulder. This is Hariti, the protectress
      of children. Similar figures can be found on Sarmatian metalwork
      in the lower Don basin, a region also influenced by northern India.

      More to follow.

      Gothically

      Bertil
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