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Gundestrup (Jutland) in Bavaria

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  • Bertil Haggman
    This enigmatic bowl has variously been attributed to the Celts, Goths and Thracians. Looking at the phalera from Gundestrup and comparing to ones found in
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 21, 2002
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      This enigmatic bowl has variously been attributed
      to the Celts, Goths and Thracians.

      Looking at the phalera from Gundestrup and comparing to
      ones found in Rawalpindi and on Sark Island in the English
      Channel, one could well find a Eurasian link. Where and who
      made Gundestrup is not clear.

      The Sark Island cauldrons were found in 1718 and are now
      lost but detailed drawings exist.

      There could even be Gothic-Indian links. First from India to
      the Goths in Thrace, where the cauldron most likely was made,
      and thence to Denmark. The deities on the cauldron are
      pancultural so the connection to the Celts is very questionable.

      Gothically

      Bertil Haggman
      No! as stated in the article it is believed to be a celtic-thrachian work.
      It is indeed believed to be more thrachian than celtic because of
      silver-smith techniques used in the work.

      "det keltisk-thrakiske
      soelvkar med reliefbilleder, som i 1891 blev fundet i Rævemorsen nær
      Aars i Himmerland."
    • Bertil Haggman
      For an international look at Gundestrup I d like to recommend SEM-Identification and Documentation of Tool Marks and Surface Textures on the Gundestrup
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 21, 2002
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        For an international look at Gundestrup
        I'd like to recommend

        SEM-Identification and Documentation
        of Tool Marks and Surface Textures on the
        Gundestrup Cauldron, Recent Advances in the
        Conservation and Analysis of Artifacts. 1987.

        The Bergquist-Taylor article on the cauldron
        in Antiquity, March 1987.

        Gothically

        Bertil Haggman
      • faltin2001
        ... A large amount of material has been published on the Gundestrup kettle. It is Thracian-Celtic and belongs likely to the late La Tene culture. The Goths
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 21, 2002
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          --- In gothic-l@y..., "Bertil Haggman" <mvk575b@t...> wrote:
          > This enigmatic bowl has variously been attributed
          > to the Celts, Goths and Thracians.
          >
          > Looking at the phalera from Gundestrup and comparing to
          > ones found in Rawalpindi and on Sark Island in the English
          > Channel, one could well find a Eurasian link. Where and who
          > made Gundestrup is not clear.



          A large amount of material has been published on the Gundestrup
          kettle. It is Thracian-Celtic and belongs likely to the late La Tene
          culture. The Goths have not even the slightest thing to do with it.
          They turned up in the region were the kettle was made some 500 years
          later!





          >
          > The Sark Island cauldrons were found in 1718 and are now
          > lost but detailed drawings exist.
          >
          > There could even be Gothic-Indian links. First from India to
          > the Goths in Thrace, where the cauldron most likely was made,
          > and thence to Denmark. The deities on the cauldron are
          > pancultural so the connection to the Celts is very questionable.



          No, what is questionable is your insistance that the cauldron is
          Gothic or even Indian, which flies in the face of every serious
          research. These hapless attempts to prove a Scandinavian origin of
          the East Germanic Goths casts a very dubious light on the few serious
          people left who believe in that theory as well.

          Dirk
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