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Star, Quarterfoil & Swan Iconography

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  • Ingemar Nordgren
    Dear mazgallos! Thank you for your very thorough and valuable information about seals, tombs and other heraldry. Best Ingemar
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 14, 2002
      Dear mazgallos!

      Thank you for your very thorough and valuable information about seals,
      tombs and other heraldry.

      Best
      Ingemar


      > From: "mazgallos" <cdecarvalho@...>
      > Subject: Star, Quarterfoil & Swan Iconography
      >
    • Carlos Carvalho
      Well I personally think that the crescent could either have a religious or laymen signification, necessarily different. Didn t know the english explanation,
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 17, 2002
        Well I personally think that the crescent could either have a religious
        or laymen signification, necessarily different.
        Didn't know the english explanation, seems interesting. Has anyone
        found a piece of this glancing device ?
        The story of the Bouillon familly is well known here as one portuguese
        Bulhoes family (one of the earlier Bulhoes was St. Anthony) claims
        to descend from these.
        As a piece it indicates treason (they say because of its dark meat as
        a contrast to the white feathers). It is then for a strong reason that a
        family would allow to put it in their heraldry. I suspect this has something
        to do with the fight Roderico / Witiza question. My future messages will
        try to enlighten more this.

        Regards,

        Carlos Carvalho
        (Maia - Portugal)


        >
        > "Smith's Ordinary". an English compilation of medieaval armor
        > bearings, lists 168 shields under Crescents.According to Peter Gwynn
        > Jones (Lancaster Herald) the crescent was too common in early
        > heraldry to have anything but a utilitarian origin. Practicality in
        > the 12th century, Jones alleges, was the all-guiding principle in the
        > manufacture of arms, and it's likely that the crescent " was
        > (originally) no more than a glancing device used to deflect a sword
        > or an arrow at an oblique angle."
        >
        > Also, it's my understanding that the crescent was found inscribed
        > into the catacombs of Rome. In any event, from about 1280 to to 1750,
        > the crescent was used as a watermark by European paper manufacturers.
        > This industry appears to have been introduced into France and Italy
        > by the pre-reformation heresies, the Vaudois and the Albegeois, and
        > the Cathari and the Patarini, respectively.Many of these crescents
        > are surmounted by the seal of Solomon, or, as it is called today, the
        > Star of David.
        >
        > The swan is a cognate device, and is alleged to have been inspired by
        > an 11th century legend. The story goes that the Duchess of Boullion
        > married a knight who had arrived at her castle in a boat drawn by a
        > swan. Other versions of the legend has the knight marrying the
        > Duchess of Brabant, from whom sprang the ducal line of Cleves, and,
        > who, like the Count of Boulonge adopted the swan as their heraldic
        > device. (Sir Anthony Wagner Clarenceux King of Arms)
        >
        > Ben
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