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Gothic religion and magic-1

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  • hrafnsnest
    Hail All! I have, over the past few months, pretty much have been taking in all of the various topics on this list. I find it very informative, especially
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4, 2002
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      Hail All!
      I have, over the past few months, pretty much have been taking in
      all of the various topics on this list. I find it very informative,
      especially Bertils postings of the etymology of the word Eruli. I
      shall attempt, over the next few months, to post material on the
      general subject of Gothic religion and magic. This is an area which
      is often either dismissed or avoided. Granted, some of the
      conclusions are controversial, but that's what makes the discussion
      interesting and informative.

      Jordanes chp. 24, who, in accounting for the origin of the Huns,
      relates that a group of witches ([H]aljorunas ~ al. alyrunas,
      aliorunas, aliuruncas) were thrown out of the Gothic kingdom, engaged
      in "unspeakable" rituals with "demons" of the Russian steppes, and
      gave birth to them. This legend alone, must have had an interesting
      influence on the relationship between the Goths and Huns.

      Aurinia (Alirunais, Alrun, Alraun), a "wise-woman" is said to have
      been famous in Germany before Veleda, and equally significant, the ON
      name Ölrûn, Sæm. 133-4, belongs to a wise-woman, or more precisely, a
      wise valkyrie.

      It is interesting to note that in modern Icelandic the word for
      Mandrake is -Thjofarot- "the thief's root", and is believed to grow
      from the blood or urine from a hanged thief under the spot where a
      gallows once stood. In ON the mandrake was called -ölrun-, and in OHG
      it is -alruna-.
      Two Old French sources tell how the mandrake plucker dies upon
      hearing the scream of the plant as it is being plucked. Several
      researchers have taken this "formula" and applied it to the ritual
      hanging rites performed in ancient times, whereby the initiant is
      hung upside down over the -alrune-, between Asgardhr and Midhgardhr,
      it is taken up screaming, he/she "dies" and is "reborn" with the
      mysteries revealed.
      Alruna, now Alraun(e), has semantically shifted from the wise-woman
      (or witch) to the plant, now used by the witch. It also has possible
      connections with the ON word "alu".

      Sources for this info. will be gladly posted.
      Jeff
    • hakangot
      ... Hi Jeff and all! I think that you could be right on this. H]aljorunas-alruna could have the same origin. One alternative could be that Haljo-comes from a
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 14, 2002
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        --- In gothic-l@y..., "hrafnsnest" <hrafn@g...> wrote:

        Hi Jeff and all!
        I think that you could be right on this. H]aljorunas-alruna could
        have the same origin. One alternative could be that Haljo-comes from
        a form of "hell". And -runa meaning secret, "hell´s secret". But
        everything is possssible I think that you might be on to something
        interesting.


        Håkan Liljeberg

        > Hail All!
        > I have, over the past few months, pretty much have been taking in
        > all of the various topics on this list. I find it very
        informative,
        > especially Bertils postings of the etymology of the word Eruli. I
        > shall attempt, over the next few months, to post material on the
        > general subject of Gothic religion and magic. This is an area
        which
        > is often either dismissed or avoided. Granted, some of the
        > conclusions are controversial, but that's what makes the discussion
        > interesting and informative.
        >
        > Jordanes chp. 24, who, in accounting for the origin of the Huns,
        > relates that a group of witches ([H]aljorunas ~ al. alyrunas,
        > aliorunas, aliuruncas) were thrown out of the Gothic kingdom,
        engaged
        > in "unspeakable" rituals with "demons" of the Russian steppes, and
        > gave birth to them. This legend alone, must have had an
        interesting
        > influence on the relationship between the Goths and Huns.
        >
        > Aurinia (Alirunais, Alrun, Alraun), a "wise-woman" is said to have
        > been famous in Germany before Veleda, and equally significant, the
        ON
        > name Ölrûn, Sæm. 133-4, belongs to a wise-woman, or more precisely,
        a
        > wise valkyrie.
        >
        > It is interesting to note that in modern Icelandic the word for
        > Mandrake is -Thjofarot- "the thief's root", and is believed to grow
        > from the blood or urine from a hanged thief under the spot where a
        > gallows once stood. In ON the mandrake was called -ölrun-, and in
        OHG
        > it is -alruna-.
        > Two Old French sources tell how the mandrake plucker dies upon
        > hearing the scream of the plant as it is being plucked. Several
        > researchers have taken this "formula" and applied it to the ritual
        > hanging rites performed in ancient times, whereby the initiant is
        > hung upside down over the -alrune-, between Asgardhr and
        Midhgardhr,
        > it is taken up screaming, he/she "dies" and is "reborn" with the
        > mysteries revealed.
        > Alruna, now Alraun(e), has semantically shifted from the wise-
        woman
        > (or witch) to the plant, now used by the witch. It also has
        possible
        > connections with the ON word "alu".
        >
        > Sources for this info. will be gladly posted.
        > Jeff
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