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Re: [AncientWeapons] Check out news.telegraph.co.uk - Etruscan 'Pompeii' unco...

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  • jpisc98357@aol.com
    Dear Friends, ... Best Regards, John www.johnpiscoposwords.com PO Box 137 Western Springs, IL 60558 (708)246-7111 [Non-text portions of this message have been
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4, 2002
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      Dear Friends,

      Here is the original story that Ananova copied from the News Telegraph:

      > <A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;$sessionid$BDMQZ1YAAFHT1QFIQMGCFFOAVCBQUIV0?xml=/news/2002/04/04/wetru04.xml&sSheet=/news/2002/04/04/ixworld.html">Click here: news.telegraph.co.uk - Etruscan 'Pompeii' uncovered in Tuscany</A>
      > Etruscan 'Pompeii' uncovered in Tuscany
      > By Bruce Johnston in Rome
      > (Filed: 04/04/2002)
      >
      >
      > THE ruins of an unknown Etruscan city dating back nearly 3,000 years have
      > been discovered in Tuscany, the largest find of its kind.
      >
      > Archaeologists said yesterday the site, named Accesa after the lake on
      > whose shores it was found, would "for the first time enable us to enter
      > into contact with the everyday Etruscan world".
      >
      > While much is known about the tombs of the Etruscans - who occupied the
      > area north of ancient Rome and whose advanced civilisation predated it -
      > little is known about them or their cities.
      >
      > "What we are probably looking at here is a settlement which may be
      > considered to be the Pompeii of the Etruscan world," said Giovannangelo
      > Camporeale, professor of Etruscology at the University of Florence, who is
      > in charge of the excavations.
      >
      > The 2,700-year-old city, near Massa Marittima in southern Tuscany, was
      > covered in woodland when excavations began.
      >
      > "We have uncovered 65 acres so far and it is certainly much bigger," said
      > Prof Camporeale. The fact that the site had not been disturbed by
      > subsequent settlers meant it could "hold the key" to Etruscan mysteries.
      >
      > "Many other Etruscan cities are bigger," he said. "But we cannot tear down
      > the modern houses now on the sites to examine what lies beneath."
      >
      > <A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2002/03/23/wves23.xml">23 March 2002: 'Prehistoric Venice' near Vesuvius</A>

      Best Regards, John
      www.johnpiscoposwords.com
      PO Box 137
      Western Springs, IL 60558
      (708)246-7111


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • M. Carver
      Hails! How do you hope to connect this to Gothic studies? Mat?aius ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 4, 2002
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        Hails!

        How do you hope to connect this to Gothic studies?

        Mat?aius



        jpisc98357@... wrote:

        > Dear Friends,
        >
        > Here is the original story that Ananova copied from the News Telegraph:
        >
        > > <A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;$sessionid$BDMQZ1YAAFHT1QFIQMGCFFOAVCBQUIV0?xml=/news/2002/04/04/wetru04.xml&sSheet=/news/2002/04/04/ixworld.html">Click here: news.telegraph.co.uk - Etruscan 'Pompeii' uncovered in Tuscany</A>
        > > Etruscan 'Pompeii' uncovered in Tuscany
        > > By Bruce Johnston in Rome
        > > (Filed: 04/04/2002)
        > >
        > >
        > > THE ruins of an unknown Etruscan city dating back nearly 3,000 years have
        > > been discovered in Tuscany, the largest find of its kind.
        > >
        > > Archaeologists said yesterday the site, named Accesa after the lake on
        > > whose shores it was found, would "for the first time enable us to enter
        > > into contact with the everyday Etruscan world".
        > >
        > > While much is known about the tombs of the Etruscans - who occupied the
        > > area north of ancient Rome and whose advanced civilisation predated it -
        > > little is known about them or their cities.
        > >
        > > "What we are probably looking at here is a settlement which may be
        > > considered to be the Pompeii of the Etruscan world," said Giovannangelo
        > > Camporeale, professor of Etruscology at the University of Florence, who is
        > > in charge of the excavations.
        > >
        > > The 2,700-year-old city, near Massa Marittima in southern Tuscany, was
        > > covered in woodland when excavations began.
        > >
        > > "We have uncovered 65 acres so far and it is certainly much bigger," said
        > > Prof Camporeale. The fact that the site had not been disturbed by
        > > subsequent settlers meant it could "hold the key" to Etruscan mysteries.
        > >
        > > "Many other Etruscan cities are bigger," he said. "But we cannot tear down
        > > the modern houses now on the sites to examine what lies beneath."
        > >
        > > <A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2002/03/23/wves23.xml">23 March 2002: 'Prehistoric Venice' near Vesuvius</A>
        >
        > Best Regards, John
        > www.johnpiscoposwords.com
        > PO Box 137
        > Western Springs, IL 60558
        > (708)246-7111


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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