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$ SUEVIC COINAGE $

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  • Francisco Santos
    The fall of the Roman Empire in the west dates from the end of the year 406, when barbarian armies, after intense fighting, forced their way across the Rhine.
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 10 4:16 AM
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      The fall of the Roman Empire in the west dates from the end of the year 406,
      when barbarian armies, after intense fighting, forced their way across the
      Rhine. They overran the Gauls, and in September - October 409 crossed the
      pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, where they were soon afterwards
      assigned land. The Sueves received the Conventus Braccarensis, which
      included the cities of Oporto and Braga, and were the only ones of these
      first invaders to remain permanently where they settled. Unlike the nomadic
      Alans and the destructive Vandals, they were Germanic peasants who had been
      established near the borders of the Empire. Like other barbarian peoples,
      they were illiterate and pagan. Their kingdom lasted a little more than 170
      years, until 586, when it was suppressed by Leovigild, that is to say, not
      much less than half as long as the four centuries of the Roman Empire
      itself.

      http://www.fringosa.com/numismatica.htm


      Francisco
    • faltin2001
      Hi Francisco, you are quite right. After the Vandals were driven out of Spain, it looked for a while as if the Suevi would become masters of all of Spain. From
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 11 1:23 AM
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        Hi Francisco,

        you are quite right. After the Vandals were driven out of Spain, it
        looked for a while as if the Suevi would become masters of all of
        Spain. From their mountainous base, the Suevi raided widely, even
        taking Merida in 439 and Seville in 441. The Romans commissioned the
        Visigoths to attack the Suevi and curtail their expandion. In 456AD
        they were defeated near Astorge. The Suevic kingdom continued its
        independent existence until the end of the 6th century, when it was
        finally incorporated into the Visigothic kingdom.


        The Suevi started imitating Roman solidi (largest regular gold
        denomination) of Honorius from the early 5th century. The name of
        Honorius (in various barbarized forms) was continued on Suevic coins
        into the 6th century. Suevi tremisses (one-third solidi) copy the
        Roman tremisses of Valentinian III. All Suevic coins are easily
        recognizable by their distinct style.

        Silver was only very rarely minted in the Suevic kingdom. However, an
        extremely rare siliqua shows the full name of the king Reckilar,
        making him the first Germanic king ever to put his name on a coin
        (mid 5th. cent.).

        cheers,
        Dirk














        --- In gothic-l@y..., "Francisco Santos" <fringosa@c...> wrote:
        > The fall of the Roman Empire in the west dates from the end of the
        year 406,
        > when barbarian armies, after intense fighting, forced their way
        across the
        > Rhine. They overran the Gauls, and in September - October 409
        crossed the
        > pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, where they were soon afterwards
        > assigned land. The Sueves received the Conventus Braccarensis, which
        > included the cities of Oporto and Braga, and were the only ones of
        these
        > first invaders to remain permanently where they settled. Unlike the
        nomadic
        > Alans and the destructive Vandals, they were Germanic peasants who
        had been
        > established near the borders of the Empire. Like other barbarian
        peoples,
        > they were illiterate and pagan. Their kingdom lasted a little more
        than 170
        > years, until 586, when it was suppressed by Leovigild, that is to
        say, not
        > much less than half as long as the four centuries of the Roman
        Empire
        > itself.
        >
        > http://www.fringosa.com/numismatica.htm
        >
        >
        > Francisco
      • Francisco Santos
        Hello Dirk All this I know, know the history deeply. I was just answering to an acquaintance friend of the numismatic area, he didn t know about the existence
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 11 2:03 AM
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          Hello Dirk

          All this I know, know the history deeply.
          I was just answering to an acquaintance friend of the numismatic area, he
          didn't know about the existence of suevic coins.
          In the book that I have for sale, the suevic coinage is published
          thoroughly. Including three silver siliqua, only known.

          Everything of good
          http://www.fringosa.com/numismatica.htm

          Francisco
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: faltin2001 <dirk@...>
          To: <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, February 11, 2002 9:23 AM
          Subject: [gothic-l] Re: $ SUEVIC COINAGE $


          >
          > Hi Francisco,
          >
          > you are quite right. After the Vandals were driven out of Spain, it
          > looked for a while as if the Suevi would become masters of all of
          > Spain. From their mountainous base, the Suevi raided widely, even
          > taking Merida in 439 and Seville in 441. The Romans commissioned the
          > Visigoths to attack the Suevi and curtail their expandion. In 456AD
          > they were defeated near Astorge. The Suevic kingdom continued its
          > independent existence until the end of the 6th century, when it was
          > finally incorporated into the Visigothic kingdom.
          >
          >
          > The Suevi started imitating Roman solidi (largest regular gold
          > denomination) of Honorius from the early 5th century. The name of
          > Honorius (in various barbarized forms) was continued on Suevic coins
          > into the 6th century. Suevi tremisses (one-third solidi) copy the
          > Roman tremisses of Valentinian III. All Suevic coins are easily
          > recognizable by their distinct style.
          >
          > Silver was only very rarely minted in the Suevic kingdom. However, an
          > extremely rare siliqua shows the full name of the king Reckilar,
          > making him the first Germanic king ever to put his name on a coin
          > (mid 5th. cent.).
          >
          > cheers,
          > Dirk
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In gothic-l@y..., "Francisco Santos" <fringosa@c...> wrote:
          > > The fall of the Roman Empire in the west dates from the end of the
          > year 406,
          > > when barbarian armies, after intense fighting, forced their way
          > across the
          > > Rhine. They overran the Gauls, and in September - October 409
          > crossed the
          > > pyrenees into the Iberian Peninsula, where they were soon afterwards
          > > assigned land. The Sueves received the Conventus Braccarensis, which
          > > included the cities of Oporto and Braga, and were the only ones of
          > these
          > > first invaders to remain permanently where they settled. Unlike the
          > nomadic
          > > Alans and the destructive Vandals, they were Germanic peasants who
          > had been
          > > established near the borders of the Empire. Like other barbarian
          > peoples,
          > > they were illiterate and pagan. Their kingdom lasted a little more
          > than 170
          > > years, until 586, when it was suppressed by Leovigild, that is to
          > say, not
          > > much less than half as long as the four centuries of the Roman
          > Empire
          > > itself.
          > >
          > > http://www.fringosa.com/numismatica.htm
          > >
          > >
          > > Francisco
          >
          >
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          >
          >
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