Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The Eruli, Gothic Bibleverses and Runes

Expand Messages
  • Bertil Haggman
    Tore, Thank you for your recommendation of the link underneath. I will take a look. Meanwhile I think it is important to compare the Roek Runestone s poetic
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 13, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Tore,

      Thank you for your recommendation of the link
      underneath. I will take a look.

      Meanwhile I think it is important to compare
      the Roek Runestone's poetic parts, the Stentoften
      Runestone on Listerland and some Gothic passages
      to show similarities. Of course Goths and Eruli
      were culturally close.

      Let me start with a translation of Stentoften:

      The settlers,
      the newcomers
      gave Hathuwolf riches,
      showered Hariwolf with wealth

      Nybyggarna,
      bykomlingarna
      gav Hathuwolf aering,
      oeveroeste Hariwolf med rikedom.

      The above runetext is the only poetic text
      in Sweden on a runestone beside the poetic lines
      on the Roek Runestone.

      What I would then like to bring up are examples
      from Gothic bible manuscripts starting with
      Romans Chapter 12,1:

      Saa foermanar jag nu eder, mina broeder,
      vid Guds barmhaertighet,
      att frambaera edra kroppar till ett levande,
      heligt och Gud vaelbehagligt offer.

      Bidja nu izwis brothrjus
      thairh bleithein Guths
      usgiban leka izwara
      saud qiwana weihana
      waila galeikaidana Gutha

      These are the same type of sense lines (sv. meningsrader)
      as we can experience on the Roek and Stentoften runestones.

      Also Romans 12, 20

      Om min ovaen aer hungrig,
      saa giv honom att aeta,
      om han aer toerstig,
      saa giv honom att dricka;
      ty om du saa goer,
      samlar du gloedande kol paa hans huvud.

      Jabai gredo fijand theinana
      mat gif imma
      ith jabai thaursjai
      dragkei ina
      thata auk taujands
      haurja funins
      rikis
      ana haubith is.

      If we compare to Stentoften there is a comparable
      type of sc. sense lines.

      The technique in Theodorics kingdom in northern
      Italy can no doubt be compared to the art of the
      runemaster, who was responsible for the Stentoften
      inscription.

      Erulically-gothically

      Bertil


      > I found this link on the web http://home9.swipnet.se/~w-93783/index.html
      >
      > This is a wellknown Norwegian linguist that says
      > In recent years, however, the enigma of the ancient Old Futhark
      > inscriptions has to a large extent been solved. It has been conclusively
      > proved that all of the most ancient Old Futhark inscriptions in the world
      > are written in Semitic language. It has also been proved that they are
      > intimately associated with Semitic fertility cult. Consequently this also
      > applies for the ancient Old Futhark inscriptions of Blekinge, southeast
      > Sweden.
    • faltin2001
      ... If I may just throw in a somewhat different reading of the Stentoften Stone: Stentoften Stone (middle of the 7th century, Sweden) I 1: nihua borumR `new
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 13, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In gothic-l@y..., "Bertil Haggman" <mvk575b@t...> wrote:
        > Tore,
        >
        > Thank you for your recommendation of the link
        > underneath. I will take a look.
        >
        > Meanwhile I think it is important to compare
        > the Roek Runestone's poetic parts, the Stentoften
        > Runestone on Listerland and some Gothic passages
        > to show similarities. Of course Goths and Eruli
        > were culturally close.
        >
        > Let me start with a translation of Stentoften:
        >
        > The settlers,
        > the newcomers
        > gave Hathuwolf riches,
        > showered Hariwolf with wealth
        >
        > Nybyggarna,
        > bykomlingarna
        > gav Hathuwolf aering,
        > oeveroeste Hariwolf med rikedom.




        If I may just throw in a somewhat different reading of the Stentoften
        Stone:


        Stentoften Stone (middle of the 7th century, Sweden)
        I 1: nihua borumR

        `new' (acc.), `son' (or `peasant')

        I 2: nihua gestumR

        'new' (acc.), `guest' (acc.)

        I 3: haþuwolafR gaf j

        `combat - wolf' (a name), gave Jeran'

        I 4: hariwolafR (m)aXXu s nu h(l)e

        `herd-wolf (a name), (m)aXXu s = ?; nu = `now'; hle = `treasure'

        I 5: hideR runono felaheka hed / / era ginoronoR

        I 6: heramalasaR arageu weladud sa þat / / bariutiþ

        For I1-I4, Krause translates:

        `The new peasant (?), the new guest gave a good year to Half, Herjolf
        now... a treasure.'


        Thus, in this reading there is no clear indication that the text was
        refering to settlers, at best one new farmer, who -for reasons
        unknown to us - moved to the area in the middle of the 7th century.
        The stone was written by the same person who wrote the Bjöketorp
        stone in the second half of the 7th century, because I5-I6 are almost
        identical.

        Dirk








        >
        > The above runetext is the only poetic text
        > in Sweden on a runestone beside the poetic lines
        > on the Roek Runestone.
        >
        > What I would then like to bring up are examples
        > from Gothic bible manuscripts starting with
        > Romans Chapter 12,1:
        >
        > Saa foermanar jag nu eder, mina broeder,
        > vid Guds barmhaertighet,
        > att frambaera edra kroppar till ett levande,
        > heligt och Gud vaelbehagligt offer.
        >
        > Bidja nu izwis brothrjus
        > thairh bleithein Guths
        > usgiban leka izwara
        > saud qiwana weihana
        > waila galeikaidana Gutha
        >
        > These are the same type of sense lines (sv. meningsrader)
        > as we can experience on the Roek and Stentoften runestones.
        >
        > Also Romans 12, 20
        >
        > Om min ovaen aer hungrig,
        > saa giv honom att aeta,
        > om han aer toerstig,
        > saa giv honom att dricka;
        > ty om du saa goer,
        > samlar du gloedande kol paa hans huvud.
        >
        > Jabai gredo fijand theinana
        > mat gif imma
        > ith jabai thaursjai
        > dragkei ina
        > thata auk taujands
        > haurja funins
        > rikis
        > ana haubith is.
        >
        > If we compare to Stentoften there is a comparable
        > type of sc. sense lines.
        >
        > The technique in Theodorics kingdom in northern
        > Italy can no doubt be compared to the art of the
        > runemaster, who was responsible for the Stentoften
        > inscription.
        >
        > Erulically-gothically
        >
        > Bertil
        >
        >
        > > I found this link on the web http://home9.swipnet.se/~w-
        93783/index.html
        > >
        > > This is a wellknown Norwegian linguist that says
        > > In recent years, however, the enigma of the ancient Old Futhark
        > > inscriptions has to a large extent been solved. It has been
        conclusively
        > > proved that all of the most ancient Old Futhark inscriptions in
        the world
        > > are written in Semitic language. It has also been proved that
        they are
        > > intimately associated with Semitic fertility cult. Consequently
        this also
        > > applies for the ancient Old Futhark inscriptions of Blekinge,
        southeast
        > > Sweden.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.