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[gothic-l] Swedish and Spanish Gothicism

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  • Bertil Häggman
    It seems awfully quiet on the Gothic List these days. Thus I thought it might be time to bring up the matter I promised to return to: The major clash between
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 30 7:57 AM
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      It seems awfully quiet on the Gothic List these days.
      Thus I thought it might be time to bring up the
      matter I promised to return to:
       
      The major clash between Swedish and Spanish
      gothicism took place in Basel Switzerland in 1434
      at the Basel Concilium of the Catholic church.
      As a matter of fact the great battle at that
      meeting took place between Spain and England
      for the rank of being the oldest kingdom in
      Europe.
       
      The envoy of Eric of Pomerania, the then king of
      the united Scandinavian kingdoms of Denmark,
      Norway and Sweden, Bishop Nicolaus Ragvaldi of
      Vaexjoe, rose to claim that Eric was the true
      heir of the Goths, "rex gothorum", a title, by the way
      still carried by the King of Sweden, Charles XVI Gustavus.
       
      Don Alfonso, the Spanish legate, when his time came
      to speak, challenged Bishop Ragvaldi and said that
      the inhabitants of these cold regions of Europe could
      in no way be regarded superior to the Spanish,
      as they were descendants of the Goths who migrated
      from southern Scandinavia and conquered vast
      territories. The Spaniards must therefore be regarded
      to be above the descendants of those who quietly
      remained behind. The kings of the north were great
      and glorious but greater and more shining were the
      kings who emerged from Gothia and conquered
      Italy, Gaul and Spain. These Goths were the
      ancestors of those who today hold the spire of
      Spain.
       
      This exchange in Basel, Switzerland, clearly indicates
      how important the relation to the glorious Goths was
      in the late Middle Ages and onward.
       
      As a national ideal of Castile the unity the Visigoths
      created was held forward. The unification of Castile and
      Aragon was based on the Visigothic ideal.
       
      As late as in the 15th century one of the most famous poems,
      Juan de Mena's El Laberinto de Fortuna,  reflects the glory of
      the Visigoths. One verse is dedicated to Gotia, the noble
      and fine country in the north, from where the Goths migrated
      "so that our Spain could feel joy over a glorious kingdom".
       
      Gothically
       
      Bertil Haggman
       
       

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