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[gothic-l] Re: 'Place of the Birch Trees', alphabet, concordance

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  • Grsartor@aol.com
    About burg , and its possibly meaning fortress or mountain: In Gothic baurgs is town, and bairgs is mountain. There are corresponding words in other Germanic
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 6, 1999
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      About "burg", and its possibly meaning fortress or mountain:

      In Gothic baurgs is town, and bairgs is mountain.

      There are corresponding words in other Germanic tongues. E.g. in English the
      words are borough and barrow (in the sense burial mound). I would guess that
      at one time burg/borough/baurg etc had the sense fortress or place of
      protection. Cp OE beorgan, to protect, and Icelandic bjarga, which I think
      means rescue.

      As for the name Bateman and its origin, I have got no idea whether it comes
      from an expression meaning "battle protector", as suggested in an earlier
      mail; but the following may be of interest:

      In Old English "beadu" = battle and "mund" (literally hand) was sometimes
      used to mean protector. There may well be similar words in other Germanic
      languages. For example Icelandic has "boedh" = battle and "mund" = hand. I
      have here used "oe" to stand for "o" with dieresis and "dh" to stand for the
      letter sometimes called eth.

      Allans golja

      Gerry T.

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    • David Salo
      ... Old English used both specen and sprecen for to speak , side by side. If history had been slightly different, we might spreak rather than speak
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 6, 1999
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        >I have noted other odd stuff, from my limited knowledge of German.
        >
        >Things like "Gesprochen" = spoken, as in "Ich Habe Gesprochen!" I have
        >spoken..

        Old English used both "specen" and "sprecen" for "to speak", side by
        side. If history had been slightly different, we might "spreak" rather
        than speak today.
        Gothic, however, doesn't use a cognate like *sprikan. Words for
        speaking include:

        qiþan "to say", probably the most common word; cf. OE cweþan, ModE
        "quoth" and Old Norse kvedha

        maþljan "to say, to tell"; cf. maþl "market-place" and ON maal "speech"
        and maela "to speak"

        rodjan "to speak"; derivatives such as birodjan "murmur" and unrodjands
        "dumb" suggest to me that the basic meaning is "to vocalize, make sounds
        with the mouth."

        waurdjan "to utter, to speak words", denominated from waurd "word."

        Gothic also does not use ga- (cognate to German ge-) as a marker for
        past participles; when used it merely distinguishes several verbs in a
        variety of ways, or no way at all.



        /\ WISTR LAG WIGS RAIHTS
        \/ WRAIQS NU IST <> David Salo
        <dsalo@...> <>



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      • David Salo
        ... Both OE beadu and ON bödh come from the Germanic feminine noun *badwo. In Gothic this would have the form badwa (decline like nidwa or giba). *Badwamunds
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 6, 1999
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          >In Old English "beadu" = battle and "mund" (literally hand) was sometimes
          >used to mean protector. There may well be similar words in other Germanic
          >languages. For example Icelandic has "boedh" = battle and "mund" = hand. I
          >have here used "oe" to stand for "o" with dieresis and "dh" to stand for the
          >letter sometimes called eth.

          Both OE beadu and ON bödh come from the Germanic feminine noun *badwo.
          In Gothic this would have the form badwa (decline like nidwa or giba).
          *Badwamunds is a possible Gothic name, although I don't believe either
          element is actually attested in Gothic.
          I don't believe Bateman actually derives from *Beadumund; I think the
          most natural development of the latter in Modern English would be
          "Badmund". But one can use any name one likes.

          /\ WISTR LAG WIGS RAIHTS
          \/ WRAIQS NU IST <> David Salo
          <dsalo@...> <>



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