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Re: R: [gothic-l] Anagastes?

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  • MCLSSAA2@fs2.mt.umist.ac.uk
    ... part ... The element {gast} or similar can occur also in Slavic names, e.g. {Radagast} or {Radihost} = land-guest : Russian {gost } = guest ; after the
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 13, 2000
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      --- In gothic-l@egroups.com, dirk@s... wrote:
      > I really haven't got a clou about Gothic, but I thought the name
      part
      > **gast** as in Germanic names like Arbogast, Leugast etc. means
      > friend, guest (modern German 'Gast').

      The element {gast} or similar can occur also in Slavic names, e.g.
      {Radagast} or {Radihost} = "land-guest": Russian {gost'} = "guest";
      after the Dark Ages migrations, eastern Germany up to the recent Iron
      Curtain was inhabited largely by Slavs, as many placenames show.
      By -witz and -nitz and -ow and -in
      you know that Slavs once lived therein.
      But the Gallehus Horn inscription "Hlewagastiz Holtijaz horna tawido"
      is a proven example of {gast} and not {gaist} in a Common Germanic
      personal name.
    • M. Carver
      Hails Gothic *gaists would mean terror, from gaisjan, to scare. But according to the evidence thus far it seems gasts is a likelier conclusion. Dirk gives the
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 13, 2000
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        Hails

        Gothic *gaists would mean terror, from gaisjan, to scare. But according to
        the evidence thus far it seems gasts is a likelier conclusion. Dirk gives
        the examples of Leugast (Laiwigasts) and Arbogast (Arbagasts) and MCLSSAA2
        gives us Radagast (Hraþagasts). And of course I am corrected in the meaning
        of gasts which must be nothing else but "guest, stranger."

        Solutions to the ana-problem may be found in the following list:

        Aina- one, sole, lone
        Arni- secure, safe
        Auna- luck (but usu. transcribed O'ni-}
        Ana- ancestor (cf. ? Anila)

        Less likely are:

        Ana up, upon
        Anda against, along, by
        Anþa- spirit, soul
        Andi? ghost
        Anno-, asno- yearly wages
        Ans- god (but usu. transcribed Ans-)

        Examples of names possibly sharing the first element with Anagast(e)s:

        Anala/Anila (ancestor of the Goths?)
        Anaolsus
        Aniedruda
        Anilas, Anila (Annila)
        Anna (f. = Anna- or Ana- or Arna-)
        Annia (f.)

        Onegildus
        Onemundus
        Onerigus
        Onigisis
        Onila


        Matþaius
      • Frank Kermes
        Terror of Chickens. I like that. That was the problem I was having with -gast: is it *gaists? Is it gasts spirit? Gasts guest? Is it even
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 13, 2000
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          "Terror of Chickens." I like that.

          That was the problem I was having with "-gast:" is it "*gaists?" Is it
          "gasts" spirit? "Gasts" guest? Is it even Germanic? The "-es" suffix in
          the sources confused me. I'm not exactly sure how precise the Latin authors
          were in their rendering of foreign names, but "gasts" would be the strong
          masculine form, so would equate an "-us" most likey in Latin, correct? The
          "hlewangastas" inscription would seem to support the masculine inflection .
          . .

          But "Arbogast" shows up with the "-es" ending, too, doesn't he?

          Too bad the Koebler that is supposed to be in my University's reference
          library has been absconded with by some crazed philology student, or I could
          do my own hunting.

          A Greek name would probably simply be the most likely, considering the
          period and circumstances--butit _looks_ so Germanic!

          If it is "Ana" high "*gaists" frenzy, it could be a kenning for a wild horse
          on the loose, say, a stallion (OE hENGeST . . .) But of course that's just
          my fancy. I'll stick with "Hanagaists" and go scare some fowl.

          Better that I take Koebler's "Ungermanische" suggestion . . .

          Later,
          Frank
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