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[gothic-l] Gothic language

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  • LBate18495@aol.com
    Hello I find similarity between AS, Norse and Gothic because ik does seem to me the same as the Gothic ik. Also Ic in OE is also the same. So would it be
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 26, 1999
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      Hello
      I find similarity between AS, Norse and Gothic because ik does seem to
      me the same as the Gothic ik. Also Ic in OE is also the same. So would it be
      crazy to say that Gothic is more like the Mother tongue of all German speaking
      people. Wulfila and Wulfstan are they same or are they separated by one
      hundred years. The Wynn Runic in Old English did that letter have a
      resemblance to a P in Gothic because it did in the Old English Runic Alphabet.
      Could anyone post the Gothic Runic Alphabet. I am sorry if these questions
      maybe mundane to some but that is the only way I know to learn. ic habban
      Ealde Englisc ond Gotisc to geleornade. The isc on the end of certain words
      could that have been interpreted Folc waegan? Like the second sentence in
      Parkers Ms of the Chronicles uses that when talking about the five languages
      Englisc, Britisc, Waelisc, Pihtisc, and Scotisc, someone had suggested that
      this was refering to the folk ways, customs or beliefs which I had never
      thought about. Le



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    • David Salo
      ... Gothic is certainly the oldest recorded Germanic language (leaving aside some very brief runic inscriptions which are probably older); the form it is
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 26, 1999
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        > Hello
        > I find similarity between AS, Norse and Gothic because ik does seem to
        >me the same as the Gothic ik. Also Ic in OE is also the same. So would it be
        >crazy to say that Gothic is more like the Mother tongue of all German speaking
        >people.

        Gothic is certainly the oldest recorded Germanic language (leaving
        aside some very brief runic inscriptions which are probably older); the
        form it is preserved in dates from the mid to late 300s. But already at
        that time the Germanic languages had become differentiated; and the group
        of dialects ("West Germanic") which would give rise to English and German
        must have differed in a several particulars from Gothic, which has several
        peculiar characteristics (not least the general change of e to i, and o to
        u). The dialects ancestral to the Scandinavian languages ("North
        Germanic") must have been different from both the West Germanic dialects
        and from Gothic. We don't know if these dialects were all mutually
        intelligible, but it seems possible (allowing for a little effort on the
        part of the speakers).

        >Wulfila and Wulfstan are they same or are they separated by one
        >hundred years.

        More like six hundred years! Wulfila lived, as already mentioned, in the
        4th century; I don't know which of the several Wulfstan's you are thinking
        of, but the "classical" variety of Old English that you're evidently
        familiar with was being used in the 10th - 11th centuries.
        The Gothic name Wulfila means "little wolf" or "wolf-cub"; the Old
        English Wulfstan ("wolf-stone") would have been *Wulfastains in Gothic.

        >The Wynn Runic in Old English did that letter have a
        >resemblance to a P in Gothic because it did in the Old English Runic Alphabet.
        >Could anyone post the Gothic Runic Alphabet.

        No, I can't! All I can do is these ASCII characters... Perhaps someone
        can refer you to a runic webpage.
        The sound of /w/ was represented by something like
        |\
        |/
        |
        in most of the older runic alphabets (including that used by the Goths),
        as also in Anglo-Saxon. But in Wulfila's alphabet it was more or less

        | |
        \ /
        |

        a letter based on the Greek upsilon.

        I am sorry if these questions
        >maybe mundane to some but that is the only way I know to learn. ic habban
        >Ealde Englisc ond Gotisc to geleornade. The isc on the end of certain words
        >could that have been interpreted Folc waegan?

        -isc (Gothic -isks) is just an adjectival ending. It can be interpreted
        in lots of ways; usually it expresses the quality of the noun from which it
        is derived. So "Gutisks" (Gotisc) is "of or like the Gutans" (Gotan, or
        Goths). That could be in speech, dress, manner, lifestyle, ownership, or
        many other things.

        /\ WISTR LAG WIGS RAIHTS
        \/ WRAIQS NU IST <> David Salo
        <dsalo@...> <>



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