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Re: [gothic-l] active use of language

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  • M. Carver
    ... Hails, Inge For my part, I read the books on the subject. When reading Gothic, I read aloud so as to get a feel for the sound, rhythm. Doing a few
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 16, 2000
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      Inge Van Keirsbilck wrote:
      >
      > Hello everybody!
      >
      > I have only just begun to learn Gothic, and I would really like to know how
      > those of you who actively use the language went about this. Any tips?

      Hails, Inge

      For my part, I read the books on the subject. When reading Gothic, I
      read aloud so as to get a feel for the sound, rhythm. Doing a few
      translation projects and reading the Gothic corpus will allow one to
      familiarize oneself with the vocabulary, grammar and syntax to such an
      extent that the basic language is at hand. Also, it is helpful to have
      the vocabulary in database form so that one can look up the word one
      doesn't know or translate a word from English.

      --Mat├żaius
    • Manuel Gutierrez Algaba
      ... Some comments here. Modern germanic languages (english, nederlanden, norsk, svenska) have a very different phonetic system than Gothic. Those modern
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 16, 2000
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        On Wed, 16 Aug 2000, M. Carver wrote:
        > Hails, Inge
        >
        > For my part, I read the books on the subject. When reading Gothic, I
        > read aloud so as to get a feel for the sound, rhythm.

        Some comments here. Modern germanic languages (english, nederlanden,
        norsk, svenska) have a very different phonetic system than
        Gothic. Those modern languages tend to use more diphtongs and vowels
        and semivowels. Deutsch have conserved more the phonetics of them.
        So, I wonder how could sound Gothic. Moreover, Germanic is told to
        be a common ancestor with lithuanian, which certainly stresses
        some vowels over others, but it's not the phonetic nightmare of
        english ( for example). Well, I don't know much of lithuanian, but
        that's my first impression.

        > Doing a few
        > translation projects and reading the Gothic corpus will allow one to
        > familiarize oneself with the vocabulary, grammar and syntax to such an
        > extent that the basic language is at hand.

        I imagine that all this have been extracted from the bible. In this
        case, I wonder how different was "spoken" language from the
        "normalized" written language.


        Regards/Saludos
        Manolo
        www.ctv.es/USERS/irmina /TeEncontreX.html /texpython.htm
        /pyttex.htm /cruo/cruolinux.htm ICQ:77697936 (sirve el ICQ para algo?)

        QOTD: Money isn't everything, but at least it keeps the kids in touch.
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