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[gothic-l] Re: Gaskapeins 'a' (Fr. Mosaiboka)

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  • keth@online.no
    ... Unkraut vergeht nicht! In the Edda it says that after the creation everything became covered med grønan lauk . This word laukr also occurs on many
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 29, 2000
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      David Salo wrote:

      >Matþaius melida:
      >
      >>plant,herb,weed: cryde, gærs, gærswyrt, weod, wrid, wyrt.
      >>
      >>but,
      >>
      >>root: rot, wyrt, wyrtruma, wyrtwala.
      >>
      >>cryde no doubt is found in NHG as Kraut. gærs is grass (which in
      >>Gaskapeins is already used for the sense of 'grass'). Wyrt, also
      >>attested in Gotish, with sense 'root', cannot be used. Wrid is confusing.
      >>
      >>Weod has the guessable and yet enigmatic PGerm. *wiudha, unattested of
      >>any PIE root. Cryde might be one choice, then.
      >>
      >>
      >>An examination of NGerm. gives "ju'rt-" which to me is perplexing.
      >>There seems to be no obvious widespread word for plant at the time of PGerm.
      >
      >júrt is perhaps an alteration of urt (I believe urt is attested in ON) or
      >yrt, from *wurta-, *wurti-. (Initial w > 0 before rounded vowels in NGmc).
      >
      >
      >writ is perhaps a metathesis of OE wyrt, or from previously metathesized
      >*wruti-.
      >
      >All are from *wrd- (perhaps related Persian gol, gul 'rose', < *gwurd <
      >*wurd < *wrd-, cf. Avestan varëda, but this may also be from *wrdh- 'grow'
      >or another source.)
      >
      >Kraut, etc. < *krûtam = Go. !krût; *krûtam < *kwrûtam < *gwrûdom, cf. Greek
      >*gwruô > bruô "teem, abound with, grow luxuriantly". Krût might be the
      >best option for 'plant'.
      >

      Unkraut vergeht nicht!

      In the Edda it says that after the creation everything became
      covered "med grønan lauk". This word "laukr" also occurs on
      many amulets. Maybe it is the word that was used for "plant".
      (anything green that is not a tree or a bush)

      The absence of general abstract categories does not surprise me.
      Such are hardly needed in the many practical activities that daily
      life consists of.


      Best regards
      Keth
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