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[gothic-l] Gothic and Italian II

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  • Pagliarulo Giuseppe
    Godana dag allaim! Having taken another look at my Italian etymological dictionary I ve come across some fresh borrowings from Gothic I m listing here: Bando
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 29, 2000
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      Godana dag allaim!
      Having taken another look at my Italian etymological dictionary I've come across some fresh borrowings from Gothic I'm listing here:
       
      Bando "announcement" < Go bandwa
      Bega "quarrel" < Go *bega
      Fango "mud" < Go fani
      Greppia "crib" < Go *kripja
      Schietto "true, plain" < Go slaiþs
      Spiare "to spy" < Go *spaihon
      Spola "bobbin" < Go *spola
      Spranga "bolt" < Go *sparra (crossed with OHG spanga)
      Stalla "stable" < Go *stalla
      Stanga "bar" < Go *stagga
      Stecca "wand" < Go *stika
      Stropicciare "to rub insistently" < Go *straupjan
       
      Her ainshun nist dwals
      (::(
      Iosef
    • got@yesbox.net
      pagliarulo giuseppe wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/gothic-l/?start=1778 ... Sw. band tape, stripe of fabric. If
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 31, 2000
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        "pagliarulo giuseppe" <g.pagliarul-@...> wrote:
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/gothic-l/?start=1778
        > Godana dag allaim!
        > Having taken another look at my Italian etymological dictionary I've
        come across some fresh borrowings from Gothic I'm listing here:
        >
        > Bando "announcement" < Go bandwa

        Sw."band" tape, stripe of fabric. If they are related maybe the
        original meaning in Go. was maybe announcement, runic message on a
        stripe, just a thought I got.

        > Bega "quarrel" < Go *bega
        > Fango "mud" < Go fani
        > Greppia "crib" < Go *kripja
        > Schietto "true, plain" < Go slaiþs
        > Spiare "to spy" < Go *spaihon

        Sw. "speja" keep lookout

        > Spola "bobbin" < Go *spola

        "Spole" for putting the thread on when people are spinning wool etc.
        I am not sure what bobbin means, couldn´t find it in the wordlist.

        > Spranga "bolt" < Go *sparra (crossed with OHG spanga)

        "sparre" OSw. for beam or wooden construction detail in house or fence
        etc.

        > Stalla "stable" < Go *stalla

        Sw. "stall" stable

        > Stanga "bar" < Go *stagga

        Sw.stång, gotl.stangg(pronounced with a hard g)

        > Stecca "wand" < Go *stika

        "Sticka" wooden small wand from the size of a match and downwards

        > Stropicciare "to rub insistently" < Go *straupjan

        Sounds similar to Sw."strypa", which means to suffocate with hands.
        Could straupjan be related to sw."strupe", which means throat



        Gutwulfs

        > Her ainshun nist dwals
        > (::(
        > Iosef
      • Pagliarulo Giuseppe
        Godana dag, Gutwulf! I m always glad to get comparative material about the loanwords I find, so I can check them. Thank you! ... According to Wright, bandwa
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 1, 2000
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          Godana dag, Gutwulf!

          I'm always glad to get comparative material about the loanwords I find, so I
          can check them. Thank you!
          >> Godana dag allaim!
          >> Having taken another look at my Italian etymological dictionary I've
          >come across some fresh borrowings from Gothic I'm listing here:
          >>
          >> Bando "announcement" < Go bandwa
          >
          >Sw."band" tape, stripe of fabric. If they are related maybe the
          >original meaning in Go. was maybe announcement, runic message on a
          >stripe, just a thought I got.
          According to Wright, bandwa means "sign, token". Italian has benda "tape",
          which goes back to an Old Frankish *binda. I think Sw band is more probably
          related to this. Compare Gothic bindan "to bind".

          >> Bega "quarrel" < Go *bega
          >> Fango "mud" < Go fani
          >> Greppia "crib" < Go *kripja
          >> Schietto "true, plain" < Go slaiþs
          Oops! slaihts, actually.

          >> Spola "bobbin" < Go *spola
          >
          >"Spole" for putting the thread on when people are spinning wool etc.
          >I am not sure what bobbin means, couldn´t find it in the wordlist.
          Bobbin means spole.

          >> Stanga "bar" < Go *stagga
          >
          >Sw.stång, gotl.stangg(pronounced with a hard g)
          Do not forget that <gg> is pronounced /ng/ in *stagga

          >> Stropicciare "to rub insistently" < Go *straupjan
          >
          >Sounds similar to Sw."strypa", which means to suffocate with hands.
          That's interesting. Note that Italian stropicciare is almost exclusively
          used in relation to body parts, esp. eyes.

          Some other stuff I recently found:
          Tappo "stopper" < Go *tappa
          Bramare "to desire intensely", bramire "(of animals) to scream" < Go
          *bramon.
          Busca "a piece of wood for fire" < Go *busk.

          Her ainshun nist dwals
          (::(
          Iosef
        • got@yesbox.net
          pagliarulo giuseppe wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/gothic-l/?start=1780 Godana dag Iosefs, Ingeborg jah allaim!
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 1, 2000
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            "pagliarulo giuseppe" <g.pagliarul-@...> wrote:
            original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/gothic-l/?start=1780



            Godana dag Iosefs, Ingeborg jah allaim!

            > >> Having taken another look at my Italian etymological dictionary
            I've
            > >come across some fresh borrowings from Gothic I'm listing here:
            > >>
            > >> Bando "announcement" < Go bandwa
            > >
            > >Sw."band" tape, stripe of fabric. If they are related maybe the
            > >original meaning in Go. was maybe announcement, runic message on a
            > >stripe, just a thought I got.
            > According to Wright, bandwa means "sign, token". Italian has benda
            "tape",
            > which goes back to an Old Frankish *binda. I think Sw band is more
            probably
            > related to this. Compare Gothic bindan "to bind".

            Aha, yes Iosefs I should have thought about that. Interesting thought
            you had Ingeborg about banna "announcement, curse", it never came to my
            mind that it could have a connection. Often used in connection with
            church, sätta någon i bann "put someone out of community". There is a
            similar development in go. gatwo, gotl.gato, sw.gata "path, road". In
            bandwa the d also has been eluded, probably because it´s soft(compared
            to t). Also go. triggws, ON tryggr, sw. trygg "(feeling)safe, secure".
            I wonder if there also could be a verb like *bandw on "to announce,
            curse". I have to check the wordlist I guess.

            > >> Bega "quarrel" < Go *bega
            > >> Fango "mud" < Go fani
            > >> Greppia "crib" < Go *kripja

            I also thought about krubba Ingeborg, but I was 100% sure what "crib"
            meant.
            Good work though.

            > >> Schietto "true, plain" < Go slaiþs
            > Oops! slaihts, actually.
            > >> Spola "bobbin" < Go *spola
            > >
            > >"Spole" for putting the thread on when people are spinning wool etc.
            > >I am not sure what bobbin means, couldn´t find it in the wordlist.
            > Bobbin means spole.

            Yes, I hoped that would be right. I just come to think that there is a
            latvian word spolet "wind up". I also come to think about if there is a
            go. *spolan "wind up".

            > >> Stanga "bar" < Go *stagga
            > >
            > >Sw.stång, gotl.stangg(pronounced with a hard g)
            > Do not forget that <gg> is pronounced /ng/ in *stagga

            I know, but thanks for the comment.

            > >> Stropicciare "to rub insistently" < Go *straupjan
            > >
            > >Sounds similar to Sw."strypa", which means to suffocate with hands.
            > That's interesting. Note that Italian stropicciare is almost
            exclusively
            > used in relation to body parts, esp. eyes.
            >
            > Some other stuff I recently found:
            > Tappo "stopper" < Go *tappa

            Tapp usually used in connection with plug or stopper in beer or wine
            barrels.
            If it´s not a loan from italian, it might be an old word then. Would be
            interesting if some words are circulating. Being lost and then borrowed
            back again as a neverending process.

            > Bramare "to desire intensely", bramire "(of animals) to scream" < Go
            > *bramon.
            > Busca "a piece of wood for fire" < Go *busk.

            Sw.buske, on Gotland they still say busk "bush"

            It seems possible to guess what it could be and often it is right.



            Gutulf
          • got@yesbox.net
            ... Hails, Iosef jah allaim! Probably this hasn´t been a positive word. For the modest and conservative goths a uncontroled behaviour wasn´t their ideal. I
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 11, 2000
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              > > Bramare "to desire intensely", bramire "(of animals) to scream" < Go
              > > *bramon.

              Hails, Iosef jah allaim!
              Probably this hasn´t been a positive word. For the modest and
              conservative goths a uncontroled behaviour wasn´t their ideal. I think
              that it was first the verb for animals sound and then in italian to
              want without control.
              This also reminded me that in Sw. the verb for the bears sound is
              "brumma"roar.
              This can also applied on people who sound harsh or threatening. Could
              it be soundimitating?(onomatepoetic? Sorry, I am not sure of the
              phrase). If it was *bramon, could that explain why the form is "brumma"
              and not "bramma"? Ex:
              *bramon-*bromon-*bromma-brumma. Just a thought!

              It has been silent lately



              Gutulf
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