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[gothic-l] Re: Gothic Mother

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  • kroma
    About the Gothic word for mother, there is an Icelandic word, mæðgin, which means mother and son. And another, mæðgur, which means mother and daughter.
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 1, 1999
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      About the Gothic word for mother, there is an Icelandic word, mæðgin, which
      means mother and son. And another, mæðgur, which means mother and daughter.
      Unfortunately, I do not own an Icelandic etymological dictionary and so
      cannot find out the provenance of these terms.

      Kevin

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    • Magnus Hreinn Snaedal
      These words are derived from the root of móðir, just as feðgin father and daughter(s) and feðgar father and son(s) arer derived from the root of
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 2, 1999
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        These words are derived from the root of móðir, just as feðgin 'father and
        daughter(s)' and feðgar 'father and son(s)' arer derived from the root of
        faðir.

        M.Sn.

        At 20:13 1.12.1999 -0500, you wrote:
        >About the Gothic word for mother, there is an Icelandic word, mæðgin, which
        >means mother and son. And another, mæðgur, which means mother and daughter.
        >Unfortunately, I do not own an Icelandic etymological dictionary and so
        >cannot find out the provenance of these terms.
        >
        >Kevin
        >
      • gknysh@yahoo.com
        I have a request for members of this list. I had always been of the opinion that the word plinsjan (to dance) was a borrowing into Gothic from Old Slavic,
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 19, 2001
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          I have a request for members of this list. I had always been of the
          opinion that the word "plinsjan" (to dance) was a borrowing into
          Gothic from Old Slavic, having first read of this in vol. 1 of Henryk
          Lowmianski's "The Beginnings of Poland". Subsequently I have seen
          this repeated constantly, and have never (until yesterday)
          encountered any opposition to it. This looked (and still looks to me)
          as a position as to which there was and is broad consensus among
          linguists and gothicists in particular. The main argument, as I
          remember, being that the consonant "p" denotates a loan word when it
          appears in a start position in Gothic. However on another list,
          (cybalist) a Lithuanian linguist has questioned this. He won't
          discuss particulars, but rejects the view that the status
          of "plinsjan" as a loan word is an established view among linguists.
          Would anyone here have the patience to provide me with three or four
          reputable linguistic authorities confirming the status of "plinsjan"?
          Has anyone heard of a reputable linguist or linguists who question
          this? Thank you in advance.

          George Knysh
          University of Manitoba
        • Grsartor@aol.com
          About whether Gothic plinsjan is a borrowing from Slavic: Lehmann s Gothic Etymological Dictionary says an exception to the rule that words common to Gmc
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 20, 2001
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            About whether Gothic "plinsjan" is a borrowing from Slavic:

            Lehmann's Gothic Etymological Dictionary says

            "an exception to the rule that words common to Gmc and Sl were borrowed from
            Gmc" and he makes reference to OSl plesti = dance.

            I do not know whether this is the generally accepted view, but merely pass on
            what I find in the book mentioned above.

            Gerry T.
          • Le Bateman
            Was wondering why the Goths did not have a word similar to Modern German Tanzen. Le ... From: To: Sent: Tuesday,
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 20, 2001
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              Was wondering why the Goths did not have a word similar to Modern German
              Tanzen.
              Le
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <Grsartor@...>
              To: <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, November 20, 2001 4:55 PM
              Subject: Re: [gothic-l] "Plinsjan" as a loan word from Old Slavic


              About whether Gothic "plinsjan" is a borrowing from Slavic:

              Lehmann's Gothic Etymological Dictionary says

              "an exception to the rule that words common to Gmc and Sl were borrowed from
              Gmc" and he makes reference to OSl plesti = dance.

              I do not know whether this is the generally accepted view, but merely pass
              on
              what I find in the book mentioned above.

              Gerry T.


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            • Francisc Czobor
              ... German ... It s very simple. The Modern German tanzen, like similar words in other European languages (English dance, ME dauncen, Hugarian tancol, Romanian
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 22, 2001
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                --- In gothic-l@y..., "Le Bateman" <LeBateman@N...> wrote:
                > Was wondering why the Goths did not have a word similar to Modern
                German
                > Tanzen.
                > Le
                >

                It's very simple. The Modern German tanzen, like similar words in
                other European languages (English dance, ME dauncen, Hugarian tancol,
                Romanian dansa, etc.) comes from Old French danser. In old Germaniic
                languages, words similar to Gothic laikan "to leap (of joy)" had also
                the meaning "to dance".

                Francisc
              • Francisc Czobor
                ... German ... It s very simple. The Modern German tanzen, like similar words in other European languages (English dance, ME dauncen, Hugarian tancol, Romanian
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 22, 2001
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                  --- In gothic-l@y..., "Le Bateman" <LeBateman@N...> wrote:
                  > Was wondering why the Goths did not have a word similar to Modern
                  German
                  > Tanzen.
                  > Le
                  >

                  It's very simple. The Modern German tanzen, like similar words in
                  other European languages (English dance, ME dauncen, Hugarian tancol,
                  Romanian dansa, etc.) comes from Old French danser. In old Germanic
                  languages, words similar to Gothic laikan "to leap (of joy)" had also
                  the meaning "to dance".

                  Francisc
                • george knysh
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                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 28, 2001
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                    --- Grsartor@... wrote:
                    > About whether Gothic "plinsjan" is a borrowing from
                    > Slavic:
                    >
                    > Lehmann's Gothic Etymological Dictionary says
                    >
                    > "an exception to the rule that words common to Gmc
                    > and Sl were borrowed from
                    > Gmc" and he makes reference to OSl plesti = dance.
                    >
                    > I do not know whether this is the generally accepted
                    > view, but merely pass on
                    > what I find in the book mentioned above.
                    >
                    > Gerry T.

                    *****GK: Thanks*****
                    >


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                  • M. Carver
                    What is the possibility that this OSl plest i is not of Germanic origin? Can anyone give me etymological data for this root in slavic or balto-slavic
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 28, 2001
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                      What is the possibility that this OSl 'plest'i is not of Germanic origin?
                      Can anyone give me etymological data for this root in slavic or balto-slavic
                      languages? Aside from chronological matters, could OSl conceivably produce
                      'plesti' from, say, an unattested (E-)Gmc. *plensti (> Go. plinsti-) (for IE
                      -ti- cf. wasjan, wasti)? Thus you would have the Gothic pair plinsjan "to
                      dance", *plinsti "a dancing, dance". But perhaps the Goths were not very
                      familiar with dancing? But the Slavic cognates would help immensely to
                      determine this.

                      Matþaius

                      > From: george knysh <gknysh@...>
                      > Reply-To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2001 00:01:52 -0800 (PST)
                      > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [gothic-l] "Plinsjan" as a loan word from Old Slavic
                      >
                      >
                      > --- Grsartor@... wrote:
                      >> About whether Gothic "plinsjan" is a borrowing from
                      >> Slavic:
                      >>
                      >> Lehmann's Gothic Etymological Dictionary says
                      >>
                      >> "an exception to the rule that words common to Gmc
                      >> and Sl were borrowed from
                      >> Gmc" and he makes reference to OSl plesti = dance.
                      >>
                      >> I do not know whether this is the generally accepted
                      >> view, but merely pass on
                      >> what I find in the book mentioned above.
                      >>
                      >> Gerry T.
                      >
                      > *****GK: Thanks*****
                      >>
                      >
                      >
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                      >
                      > You are a member of the Gothic-L list. To unsubscribe, send a blank email to
                      > <gothic-l-unsubscribe@egroups.com>.
                      >
                      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                      >
                    • george knysh
                      ... *****GK: Most Slavic languages (Polish being a notable exception)lost their nasals sometime at the turn of the first millenium. So that the OSl form in
                      Message 10 of 12 , Nov 28, 2001
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                        --- "M. Carver" <me@...> wrote:
                        >Aside from chronological matters, could
                        > OSl conceivably produce
                        > 'plesti' from, say, an unattested (E-)Gmc. *plensti
                        > (> Go. plinsti-)

                        *****GK: Most Slavic languages (Polish being a notable
                        exception)lost their "nasals" sometime at the turn of
                        the first millenium. So that the OSl form in Gothic
                        times would have been identical to your "unattested
                        (E-)Gmc. *plensti or perhaps Go. *plinsti [both "en"
                        and "in" turned to "ia" in Sl after 1000 thus:
                        Vaering=Variag, Sventoslav=Sviatoslav]. I am not a
                        linguist so perhaps this follow up is inappropriate.
                        Is "plinsti" at all related to AS "plegian" "plegan"
                        whence the modern word "play" (would AS be pronounced
                        "playan"?)In my good old Webster's the first meaning
                        of "play" is described thus: "to move, swiftly,
                        erratically, or intermittently; to dart to and fro".
                        Sounds like "plinsjan" doesn't it?*****



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