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Re: Introduction Post

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  • David
    Hi Justine, Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to teaching the less taught languages . There are
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 3, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Justine,

      Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to "teaching the less taught languages". There are certainly plenty of them.

      As far as digital Wright, do you know of this link:
      http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html#images

      Looks like the following is PDF of Wright:
      http://books.google.com/books?id=PjlcAAAAMAAJ&oe=UTF-8

      And I recently discovered this link to a number of other online Gothic resources:
      http://www.lexilogos.com/english/index.htm

      There's probably a bunch more great stuff out there too... I am not at all a "technology person".

      Lambdin is a wonderful book, with thorough, clear "lessons" (chapters); generous supply of biblical texts with full glossary; and a set of chapters on historical Germanic linguistics to boot! One thing that I don't care for: He dispensed with the tradition of supplying accents to disambiguate monophthong <ai'> vs. diphthong <a'i>, and <au'> vs. <a'u>. To me this is disadvantageous to the new learner.

      If you (or anyone on this list) happens to live in central Ohio, USA, please come and attend my monthly Gothic Language Reading Group at Ohio State University. We are using Bennett's Intro to the Gothic language; it seemed to me like the best, most "accessible" way into the language for the audience we have here. You might start with Bennett, but augment your study with Lambdin.

      "Reading and enjoying the activity"--is a most worthy contribution! We are certainly not into this stuff for the money. (-;

      Cheers,
      David C.


      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hails all,
      >
      > As requested by the welcome email, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Justine, I am interested in endangered and extinct languages and linguistics (or "tugga-wissei" as the neologism list has it). I am especially interested in Native American (specifically Cherokee) and Germanic languages.
      >
      > Language extinction, preservation, and revival are my primary focus at the moment. I have a BA in English and in theology and ministry. I minored in biblical Greek (which has been helpful in studying Gothic) and Hebrew. I hope to receive my master's in Linguistics and go on to teach the less-taught languages.
      >
      > This group is an amazing find, and the amount of activity and history of posts is nothing short of remarkable. Apologies in advance if my greatest contribution at this point is reading and enjoying the activity.
      >
      > I do have a stereotypical newcomer question to pose: I am currently using Bennett's text and cautiously considering springing for Lambdin's...I have heard many good things about it but have not had a chance to flip through it and get an impression of my own. has anyone here had experiences with both texts and, if so, can you offer me some insight?
      >
      > Also, while I have been enjoying Wright's grammar in .TIF format, page by page, I wonder if anyone has published it as a single .PDF and I just haven't found it yet...? Apologies if both of these questions have been addressed in previous posts.
      >
      > Justine
      >
    • Sigi Vandewinkel
      Archive.org has pdf versions of Wright s Grammar of the Gothic Language (1910), and A Primer of the Gothic Language (1899). 
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 3, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Archive.org has pdf versions of Wright's Grammar of the Gothic Language (1910), and A Primer of the Gothic Language (1899). 

        Grammar: http://archive.org/details/grammargothicla00wriggoog
        Primer: http://archive.org/details/primerofgothicla00wriguoft

        If you read German, digital copies of the various publications by Wilhelm Streitberg on Gothic can be tracked down fairly easily. His Gotisches Elementarbuch (1920) is available on the wulfila.be website (which has several more resources relating to Gothic). 

        Elementarbuch: http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1920/
        Gotisch–Griechisch–Deutsches Wörterbuch (1910): http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1910/

        the wulfila.be website: http://www.wulfila.be/

        And finally, there's Wilhelm Braune's excellent Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken und Wörterverzeichnis (1882, but the version I'm linking you to is a reprint from 1966), scanned by Google Books and made available again through archive.org. I would recommend, however, that you get the version that was re-edited by Ebbinghaus (in I think 1970) to include (at the time) recently discovered findings (e.g. the Speyer leaf from the Codex Argenteus). Amazon.de has a second-hand copy for €5; abebooks lists several copies for a similar price.

        Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken: http://archive.org/details/gotischegrammat03braugoog
        abebooks link for the Braune & Ebbinghaus edition: http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?kn=braune+ebbinghaus+gotische&sts=t&x=-885&y=-95
         
        Sigi


        ________________________________
        From: David <dec.phd@...>
        To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 1:55
        Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post



         
        Hi Justine,

        Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to "teaching the less taught languages". There are certainly plenty of them.

        As far as digital Wright, do you know of this link:
        http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html#images

        Looks like the following is PDF of Wright:
        http://books.google.com/books?id=PjlcAAAAMAAJ&oe=UTF-8

        And I recently discovered this link to a number of other online Gothic resources:
        http://www.lexilogos.com/english/index.htm

        There's probably a bunch more great stuff out there too... I am not at all a "technology person".

        Lambdin is a wonderful book, with thorough, clear "lessons" (chapters); generous supply of biblical texts with full glossary; and a set of chapters on historical Germanic linguistics to boot! One thing that I don't care for: He dispensed with the tradition of supplying accents to disambiguate monophthong <ai'> vs. diphthong <a'i>, and <au'> vs. <a'u>. To me this is disadvantageous to the new learner.

        If you (or anyone on this list) happens to live in central Ohio, USA, please come and attend my monthly Gothic Language Reading Group at Ohio State University. We are using Bennett's Intro to the Gothic language; it seemed to me like the best, most "accessible" way into the language for the audience we have here. You might start with Bennett, but augment your study with Lambdin.

        "Reading and enjoying the activity"--is a most worthy contribution! We are certainly not into this stuff for the money. (-;

        Cheers,
        David C.

        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hails all,
        >
        > As requested by the welcome email, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Justine, I am interested in endangered and extinct languages and linguistics (or "tugga-wissei" as the neologism list has it). I am especially interested in Native American (specifically Cherokee) and Germanic languages.
        >
        > Language extinction, preservation, and revival are my primary focus at the moment. I have a BA in English and in theology and ministry. I minored in biblical Greek (which has been helpful in studying Gothic) and Hebrew. I hope to receive my master's in Linguistics and go on to teach the less-taught languages.
        >
        > This group is an amazing find, and the amount of activity and history of posts is nothing short of remarkable. Apologies in advance if my greatest contribution at this point is reading and enjoying the activity.
        >
        > I do have a stereotypical newcomer question to pose: I am currently using Bennett's text and cautiously considering springing for Lambdin's...I have heard many good things about it but have not had a chance to flip through it and get an impression of my own. has anyone here had experiences with both texts and, if so, can you offer me some insight?
        >
        > Also, while I have been enjoying Wright's grammar in .TIF format, page by page, I wonder if anyone has published it as a single .PDF and I just haven't found it yet...? Apologies if both of these questions have been addressed in previous posts.
        >
        > Justine
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Edmund
        Dear Justine, The Gotische Grammatik
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 4, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Justine,

          The >Gotische Grammatik< by Braune, first published in 1880. is now in its twentieth edition, newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004). If you plan to acquire a copy of this excellent work, this is clearly the version to get, as the last edition by Ebbinghaus dates from 1981 and is thus out-of-date now. You can buy online, through amazon.de (the German version of amazon.com). If you already have an account with amazon.com, all of your personal info will come up in the German version, with the same format as the American version. Pretty painless to use.

          You also mentioned the invented word "tugga-wissei" from a list of invented words. If I may comment, this seems like not the best choice to render 'linguistics'. The Gothic word 'tuggo' is extant only three times, and in each occurrence it means specifically 'tongue' not 'language.' The common word for 'language' in the Gothic Bible is 'razda' (cf. Old English 'reord'). Moreover, the element '-wissei' is extant only in 'mithwissei' ('conscience') -- I use the digraph 'th' here to render the letter eth, to use the Old English name. 'Mithwissei' is clearly a calque on Greek 'syneidesis' (lit. 'together-know-ing'). It would appear the Gothic coiner of this word translated part for part, and his choice of -wiss- to render -eid- was influenced by both meaning and form, eid- being, of course, cognate with Gothic wit-. The usual word for 'knowledge' in Gothic is 'kunthi' (neuter ja-stem). In light of the foregoing then, the form *razdakunthi would seem to be a better choice for 'linguistics'.

          In any case, welcome to the discussion group.


          --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Sigi Vandewinkel <sigivandewinkel@...> wrote:
          >
          > Archive.org has pdf versions of Wright's Grammar of the Gothic Language (1910), and A Primer of the Gothic Language (1899). 
          >
          > Grammar: http://archive.org/details/grammargothicla00wriggoog
          > Primer: http://archive.org/details/primerofgothicla00wriguoft
          >
          > If you read German, digital copies of the various publications by Wilhelm Streitberg on Gothic can be tracked down fairly easily. His Gotisches Elementarbuch (1920) is available on the wulfila.be website (which has several more resources relating to Gothic). 
          >
          > Elementarbuch: http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1920/
          > Gotischâ€"Griechischâ€"Deutsches Wörterbuch (1910): http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1910/
          >
          > the wulfila.be website: http://www.wulfila.be/
          >
          > And finally, there's Wilhelm Braune's excellent Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken und Wörterverzeichnis (1882, but the version I'm linking you to is a reprint from 1966), scanned by Google Books and made available again through archive.org. I would recommend, however, that you get the version that was re-edited by Ebbinghaus (in I think 1970) to include (at the time) recently discovered findings (e.g. the Speyer leaf from the Codex Argenteus). Amazon.de has a second-hand copy for €5; abebooks lists several copies for a similar price.
          >
          > Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken: http://archive.org/details/gotischegrammat03braugoog
          > abebooks link for the Braune & Ebbinghaus edition: http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?kn=braune+ebbinghaus+gotische&sts=t&x=-885&y=-95
          >  
          > Sigi
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: David <dec.phd@...>
          > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 1:55
          > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          > Hi Justine,
          >
          > Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to "teaching the less taught languages". There are certainly plenty of them.
          >
          > As far as digital Wright, do you know of this link:
          > http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html#images
          >
          > Looks like the following is PDF of Wright:
          > http://books.google.com/books?id=PjlcAAAAMAAJ&oe=UTF-8
          >
          > And I recently discovered this link to a number of other online Gothic resources:
          > http://www.lexilogos.com/english/index.htm
          >
          > There's probably a bunch more great stuff out there too... I am not at all a "technology person".
          >
          > Lambdin is a wonderful book, with thorough, clear "lessons" (chapters); generous supply of biblical texts with full glossary; and a set of chapters on historical Germanic linguistics to boot! One thing that I don't care for: He dispensed with the tradition of supplying accents to disambiguate monophthong <ai'> vs. diphthong <a'i>, and <au'> vs. <a'u>. To me this is disadvantageous to the new learner.
          >
          > If you (or anyone on this list) happens to live in central Ohio, USA, please come and attend my monthly Gothic Language Reading Group at Ohio State University. We are using Bennett's Intro to the Gothic language; it seemed to me like the best, most "accessible" way into the language for the audience we have here. You might start with Bennett, but augment your study with Lambdin.
          >
          > "Reading and enjoying the activity"--is a most worthy contribution! We are certainly not into this stuff for the money. (-;
          >
          > Cheers,
          > David C.
          >
          > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hails all,
          > >
          > > As requested by the welcome email, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Justine, I am interested in endangered and extinct languages and linguistics (or "tugga-wissei" as the neologism list has it). I am especially interested in Native American (specifically Cherokee) and Germanic languages.
          > >
          > > Language extinction, preservation, and revival are my primary focus at the moment. I have a BA in English and in theology and ministry. I minored in biblical Greek (which has been helpful in studying Gothic) and Hebrew. I hope to receive my master's in Linguistics and go on to teach the less-taught languages.
          > >
          > > This group is an amazing find, and the amount of activity and history of posts is nothing short of remarkable. Apologies in advance if my greatest contribution at this point is reading and enjoying the activity.
          > >
          > > I do have a stereotypical newcomer question to pose: I am currently using Bennett's text and cautiously considering springing for Lambdin's...I have heard many good things about it but have not had a chance to flip through it and get an impression of my own. has anyone here had experiences with both texts and, if so, can you offer me some insight?
          > >
          > > Also, while I have been enjoying Wright's grammar in .TIF format, page by page, I wonder if anyone has published it as a single .PDF and I just haven't found it yet...? Apologies if both of these questions have been addressed in previous posts.
          > >
          > > Justine
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Sigi Vandewinkel
          ... I did not know that, but I m glad I do now. Thanks for the update!   Sigi ________________________________ From: Edmund To:
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 4, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            > [...] newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004)

            I did not know that, but I'm glad I do now. Thanks for the update!
             
            Sigi


            ________________________________
            From: Edmund <edmundfairfax@...>
            To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 18:54
            Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post



             
            Dear Justine,

            The >Gotische Grammatik< by Braune, first published in 1880. is now in its twentieth edition, newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004). If you plan to acquire a copy of this excellent work, this is clearly the version to get, as the last edition by Ebbinghaus dates from 1981 and is thus out-of-date now. You can buy online, through amazon.de (the German version of amazon.com). If you already have an account with amazon.com, all of your personal info will come up in the German version, with the same format as the American version. Pretty painless to use.

            You also mentioned the invented word "tugga-wissei" from a list of invented words. If I may comment, this seems like not the best choice to render 'linguistics'. The Gothic word 'tuggo' is extant only three times, and in each occurrence it means specifically 'tongue' not 'language.' The common word for 'language' in the Gothic Bible is 'razda' (cf. Old English 'reord'). Moreover, the element '-wissei' is extant only in 'mithwissei' ('conscience') -- I use the digraph 'th' here to render the letter eth, to use the Old English name. 'Mithwissei' is clearly a calque on Greek 'syneidesis' (lit. 'together-know-ing'). It would appear the Gothic coiner of this word translated part for part, and his choice of -wiss- to render -eid- was influenced by both meaning and form, eid- being, of course, cognate with Gothic wit-. The usual word for 'knowledge' in Gothic is 'kunthi' (neuter ja-stem). In light of the foregoing then, the form *razdakunthi would seem to be a
            better choice for 'linguistics'.

            In any case, welcome to the discussion group.

            --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Sigi Vandewinkel <sigivandewinkel@...> wrote:
            >
            > Archive.org has pdf versions of Wright's Grammar of the Gothic Language (1910), and A Primer of the Gothic Language (1899). 
            >
            > Grammar: http://archive.org/details/grammargothicla00wriggoog
            > Primer: http://archive.org/details/primerofgothicla00wriguoft
            >
            > If you read German, digital copies of the various publications by Wilhelm Streitberg on Gothic can be tracked down fairly easily. His Gotisches Elementarbuch (1920) is available on the wulfila.be website (which has several more resources relating to Gothic). 
            >
            > Elementarbuch: http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1920/
            > Gotischâ€"Griechischâ€"Deutsches Wörterbuch (1910): http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1910/
            >
            > the wulfila.be website: http://www.wulfila.be/
            >
            > And finally, there's Wilhelm Braune's excellent Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken und Wörterverzeichnis (1882, but the version I'm linking you to is a reprint from 1966), scanned by Google Books and made available again through archive.org. I would recommend, however, that you get the version that was re-edited by Ebbinghaus (in I think 1970) to include (at the time) recently discovered findings (e.g. the Speyer leaf from the Codex Argenteus). Amazon.de has a second-hand copy for €5; abebooks lists several copies for a similar price.
            >
            > Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken: http://archive.org/details/gotischegrammat03braugoog
            > abebooks link for the Braune & Ebbinghaus edition: http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?kn=braune+ebbinghaus+gotische&sts=t&x=-885&y=-95
            >  
            > Sigi
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: David <dec.phd@...>
            > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 1:55
            > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post
            >
            >
            >
            >  
            > Hi Justine,
            >
            > Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to "teaching the less taught languages". There are certainly plenty of them.
            >
            > As far as digital Wright, do you know of this link:
            > http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html#images
            >
            > Looks like the following is PDF of Wright:
            > http://books.google.com/books?id=PjlcAAAAMAAJ&oe=UTF-8
            >
            > And I recently discovered this link to a number of other online Gothic resources:
            > http://www.lexilogos.com/english/index.htm
            >
            > There's probably a bunch more great stuff out there too... I am not at all a "technology person".
            >
            > Lambdin is a wonderful book, with thorough, clear "lessons" (chapters); generous supply of biblical texts with full glossary; and a set of chapters on historical Germanic linguistics to boot! One thing that I don't care for: He dispensed with the tradition of supplying accents to disambiguate monophthong <ai'> vs. diphthong <a'i>, and <au'> vs. <a'u>. To me this is disadvantageous to the new learner.
            >
            > If you (or anyone on this list) happens to live in central Ohio, USA, please come and attend my monthly Gothic Language Reading Group at Ohio State University. We are using Bennett's Intro to the Gothic language; it seemed to me like the best, most "accessible" way into the language for the audience we have here. You might start with Bennett, but augment your study with Lambdin.
            >
            > "Reading and enjoying the activity"--is a most worthy contribution! We are certainly not into this stuff for the money. (-;
            >
            > Cheers,
            > David C.
            >
            > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hails all,
            > >
            > > As requested by the welcome email, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Justine, I am interested in endangered and extinct languages and linguistics (or "tugga-wissei" as the neologism list has it). I am especially interested in Native American (specifically Cherokee) and Germanic languages.
            > >
            > > Language extinction, preservation, and revival are my primary focus at the moment. I have a BA in English and in theology and ministry. I minored in biblical Greek (which has been helpful in studying Gothic) and Hebrew. I hope to receive my master's in Linguistics and go on to teach the less-taught languages.
            > >
            > > This group is an amazing find, and the amount of activity and history of posts is nothing short of remarkable. Apologies in advance if my greatest contribution at this point is reading and enjoying the activity.
            > >
            > > I do have a stereotypical newcomer question to pose: I am currently using Bennett's text and cautiously considering springing for Lambdin's...I have heard many good things about it but have not had a chance to flip through it and get an impression of my own. has anyone here had experiences with both texts and, if so, can you offer me some insight?
            > >
            > > Also, while I have been enjoying Wright's grammar in .TIF format, page by page, I wonder if anyone has published it as a single .PDF and I just haven't found it yet...? Apologies if both of these questions have been addressed in previous posts.
            > >
            > > Justine
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • underwoodjustine
            Thank you all for your kind welcome! As for tugga-wissei I think I will stay away from the neologism list on the Files section until I have the tools to
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 5, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Thank you all for your kind welcome! As for "tugga-wissei" I think I will stay away from the neologism list on the 'Files' section until I have the tools to weigh the merits of a given, proposed word...(or until the list is revised :) )

              And thank you all for the resource links! I am so glad to have entire volumes available as a free PDF download. This has opened a lot of doors for me in the way of studying that are usually not available without a larger initial financial investment!

              I wish I did live Ohio as a study group would be of most welcome assistance at the moment. Thank you nonetheless for the invitation David, I am glad to know Ohio State has such a group! I am thoroughly impressed (and pleasantly surprised!) to have found such a number of individuals so interested in the revival and preservation of a language I had previously thought very obscure and unappreciated.

              My presuppositions have been dashed to bits. :)

              Awiliudōda izwis!

              (...I hope I said that right...)


              --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Sigi Vandewinkel <sigivandewinkel@...> wrote:
              >
              > > [...] newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004)
              >
              > I did not know that, but I'm glad I do now. Thanks for the update!
              >  
              > Sigi
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Edmund <edmundfairfax@...>
              > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 18:54
              > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post
              >
              >
              >
              >  
              > Dear Justine,
              >
              > The >Gotische Grammatik< by Braune, first published in 1880. is now in its twentieth edition, newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004). If you plan to acquire a copy of this excellent work, this is clearly the version to get, as the last edition by Ebbinghaus dates from 1981 and is thus out-of-date now. You can buy online, through amazon.de (the German version of amazon.com). If you already have an account with amazon.com, all of your personal info will come up in the German version, with the same format as the American version. Pretty painless to use.
              >
              > You also mentioned the invented word "tugga-wissei" from a list of invented words. If I may comment, this seems like not the best choice to render 'linguistics'. The Gothic word 'tuggo' is extant only three times, and in each occurrence it means specifically 'tongue' not 'language.' The common word for 'language' in the Gothic Bible is 'razda' (cf. Old English 'reord'). Moreover, the element '-wissei' is extant only in 'mithwissei' ('conscience') -- I use the digraph 'th' here to render the letter eth, to use the Old English name. 'Mithwissei' is clearly a calque on Greek 'syneidesis' (lit. 'together-know-ing'). It would appear the Gothic coiner of this word translated part for part, and his choice of -wiss- to render -eid- was influenced by both meaning and form, eid- being, of course, cognate with Gothic wit-. The usual word for 'knowledge' in Gothic is 'kunthi' (neuter ja-stem). In light of the foregoing then, the form *razdakunthi would seem to be a
              > better choice for 'linguistics'.
              >
              > In any case, welcome to the discussion group.
              >
              > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Sigi Vandewinkel <sigivandewinkel@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Archive.org has pdf versions of Wright's Grammar of the Gothic Language (1910), and A Primer of the Gothic Language (1899). 
              > >
              > > Grammar: http://archive.org/details/grammargothicla00wriggoog
              > > Primer: http://archive.org/details/primerofgothicla00wriguoft
              > >
              > > If you read German, digital copies of the various publications by Wilhelm Streitberg on Gothic can be tracked down fairly easily. His Gotisches Elementarbuch (1920) is available on the wulfila.be website (which has several more resources relating to Gothic). 
              > >
              > > Elementarbuch: http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1920/
              > > Gotischâ€"Griechischâ€"Deutsches Wörterbuch (1910): http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1910/
              > >
              > > the wulfila.be website: http://www.wulfila.be/
              > >
              > > And finally, there's Wilhelm Braune's excellent Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken und Wörterverzeichnis (1882, but the version I'm linking you to is a reprint from 1966), scanned by Google Books and made available again through archive.org. I would recommend, however, that you get the version that was re-edited by Ebbinghaus (in I think 1970) to include (at the time) recently discovered findings (e.g. the Speyer leaf from the Codex Argenteus). Amazon.de has a second-hand copy for €5; abebooks lists several copies for a similar price.
              > >
              > > Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken: http://archive.org/details/gotischegrammat03braugoog
              > > abebooks link for the Braune & Ebbinghaus edition: http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?kn=braune+ebbinghaus+gotische&sts=t&x=-885&y=-95
              > >  
              > > Sigi
              > >
              > >
              > > ________________________________
              > > From: David <dec.phd@>
              > > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 1:55
              > > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >  
              > > Hi Justine,
              > >
              > > Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to "teaching the less taught languages". There are certainly plenty of them.
              > >
              > > As far as digital Wright, do you know of this link:
              > > http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html#images
              > >
              > > Looks like the following is PDF of Wright:
              > > http://books.google.com/books?id=PjlcAAAAMAAJ&oe=UTF-8
              > >
              > > And I recently discovered this link to a number of other online Gothic resources:
              > > http://www.lexilogos.com/english/index.htm
              > >
              > > There's probably a bunch more great stuff out there too... I am not at all a "technology person".
              > >
              > > Lambdin is a wonderful book, with thorough, clear "lessons" (chapters); generous supply of biblical texts with full glossary; and a set of chapters on historical Germanic linguistics to boot! One thing that I don't care for: He dispensed with the tradition of supplying accents to disambiguate monophthong <ai'> vs. diphthong <a'i>, and <au'> vs. <a'u>. To me this is disadvantageous to the new learner.
              > >
              > > If you (or anyone on this list) happens to live in central Ohio, USA, please come and attend my monthly Gothic Language Reading Group at Ohio State University. We are using Bennett's Intro to the Gothic language; it seemed to me like the best, most "accessible" way into the language for the audience we have here. You might start with Bennett, but augment your study with Lambdin.
              > >
              > > "Reading and enjoying the activity"--is a most worthy contribution! We are certainly not into this stuff for the money. (-;
              > >
              > > Cheers,
              > > David C.
              > >
              > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hails all,
              > > >
              > > > As requested by the welcome email, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Justine, I am interested in endangered and extinct languages and linguistics (or "tugga-wissei" as the neologism list has it). I am especially interested in Native American (specifically Cherokee) and Germanic languages.
              > > >
              > > > Language extinction, preservation, and revival are my primary focus at the moment. I have a BA in English and in theology and ministry. I minored in biblical Greek (which has been helpful in studying Gothic) and Hebrew. I hope to receive my master's in Linguistics and go on to teach the less-taught languages.
              > > >
              > > > This group is an amazing find, and the amount of activity and history of posts is nothing short of remarkable. Apologies in advance if my greatest contribution at this point is reading and enjoying the activity.
              > > >
              > > > I do have a stereotypical newcomer question to pose: I am currently using Bennett's text and cautiously considering springing for Lambdin's...I have heard many good things about it but have not had a chance to flip through it and get an impression of my own. has anyone here had experiences with both texts and, if so, can you offer me some insight?
              > > >
              > > > Also, while I have been enjoying Wright's grammar in .TIF format, page by page, I wonder if anyone has published it as a single .PDF and I just haven't found it yet...? Apologies if both of these questions have been addressed in previous posts.
              > > >
              > > > Justine
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Edmund
              Dear Justine, Another couple of resources that I believe have not been mentioned: on the gothic-l site, you will see a box on the left side; if you follow the
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 6, 2013
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                Dear Justine,

                Another couple of resources that I believe have not been mentioned: on the gothic-l site, you will see a box on the left side; if you follow the "links", it will provide links to two useful sites:

                1) Wulfila Project, which has the entire Gothic Bible with Streitberg's reconstructed Vorlage as well as English translation. The Greek and English are presented in the manner of interlinear glosses. The site also has a search engine.

                2) Koebler's Gothic Dictionary - this is the most useful dictionary available: Gothic lexemes are not only glossed in both German and English but also the Greek and Latin equivalents given, as found in the Bible translations, together with etymologies and a concordance.

                You mentioned that you were interested in language preservation. I wonder if you are familiar with Nuntii Latini? This is a regular news-broadcast from Finland: every Friday at 5;55-600, some of the main news items are broadcast in Latin! If you are interested, google Nuntti Latini and the wikipedia page has a link to the official website.


                --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thank you all for your kind welcome! As for "tugga-wissei" I think I will stay away from the neologism list on the 'Files' section until I have the tools to weigh the merits of a given, proposed word...(or until the list is revised :) )
                >
                > And thank you all for the resource links! I am so glad to have entire volumes available as a free PDF download. This has opened a lot of doors for me in the way of studying that are usually not available without a larger initial financial investment!
                >
                > I wish I did live Ohio as a study group would be of most welcome assistance at the moment. Thank you nonetheless for the invitation David, I am glad to know Ohio State has such a group! I am thoroughly impressed (and pleasantly surprised!) to have found such a number of individuals so interested in the revival and preservation of a language I had previously thought very obscure and unappreciated.
                >
                > My presuppositions have been dashed to bits. :)
                >
                > Awiliudōda izwis!
                >
                > (...I hope I said that right...)
                >
                >
                > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Sigi Vandewinkel <sigivandewinkel@> wrote:
                > >
                > > > [...] newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004)
                > >
                > > I did not know that, but I'm glad I do now. Thanks for the update!
                > >  
                > > Sigi
                > >
                > >
                > > ________________________________
                > > From: Edmund <edmundfairfax@>
                > > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 18:54
                > > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >  
                > > Dear Justine,
                > >
                > > The >Gotische Grammatik< by Braune, first published in 1880. is now in its twentieth edition, newly revised by Frank Heidermanns (2004). If you plan to acquire a copy of this excellent work, this is clearly the version to get, as the last edition by Ebbinghaus dates from 1981 and is thus out-of-date now. You can buy online, through amazon.de (the German version of amazon.com). If you already have an account with amazon.com, all of your personal info will come up in the German version, with the same format as the American version. Pretty painless to use.
                > >
                > > You also mentioned the invented word "tugga-wissei" from a list of invented words. If I may comment, this seems like not the best choice to render 'linguistics'. The Gothic word 'tuggo' is extant only three times, and in each occurrence it means specifically 'tongue' not 'language.' The common word for 'language' in the Gothic Bible is 'razda' (cf. Old English 'reord'). Moreover, the element '-wissei' is extant only in 'mithwissei' ('conscience') -- I use the digraph 'th' here to render the letter eth, to use the Old English name. 'Mithwissei' is clearly a calque on Greek 'syneidesis' (lit. 'together-know-ing'). It would appear the Gothic coiner of this word translated part for part, and his choice of -wiss- to render -eid- was influenced by both meaning and form, eid- being, of course, cognate with Gothic wit-. The usual word for 'knowledge' in Gothic is 'kunthi' (neuter ja-stem). In light of the foregoing then, the form *razdakunthi would seem to be a
                > > better choice for 'linguistics'.
                > >
                > > In any case, welcome to the discussion group.
                > >
                > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Sigi Vandewinkel <sigivandewinkel@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Archive.org has pdf versions of Wright's Grammar of the Gothic Language (1910), and A Primer of the Gothic Language (1899). 
                > > >
                > > > Grammar: http://archive.org/details/grammargothicla00wriggoog
                > > > Primer: http://archive.org/details/primerofgothicla00wriguoft
                > > >
                > > > If you read German, digital copies of the various publications by Wilhelm Streitberg on Gothic can be tracked down fairly easily. His Gotisches Elementarbuch (1920) is available on the wulfila.be website (which has several more resources relating to Gothic). 
                > > >
                > > > Elementarbuch: http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1920/
                > > > Gotischâ€"Griechischâ€"Deutsches Wörterbuch (1910): http://www.wulfila.be/lib/streitberg/1910/
                > > >
                > > > the wulfila.be website: http://www.wulfila.be/
                > > >
                > > > And finally, there's Wilhelm Braune's excellent Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken und Wörterverzeichnis (1882, but the version I'm linking you to is a reprint from 1966), scanned by Google Books and made available again through archive.org. I would recommend, however, that you get the version that was re-edited by Ebbinghaus (in I think 1970) to include (at the time) recently discovered findings (e.g. the Speyer leaf from the Codex Argenteus). Amazon.de has a second-hand copy for €5; abebooks lists several copies for a similar price.
                > > >
                > > > Gotische Grammatik mit Lesestücken: http://archive.org/details/gotischegrammat03braugoog
                > > > abebooks link for the Braune & Ebbinghaus edition: http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?kn=braune+ebbinghaus+gotische&sts=t&x=-885&y=-95
                > > >  
                > > > Sigi
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > ________________________________
                > > > From: David <dec.phd@>
                > > > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Sent: Thursday, 4 July 2013, 1:55
                > > > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Introduction Post
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >  
                > > > Hi Justine,
                > > >
                > > > Having studied Yiddish, Old High German, Gothic, etc., I admire your statement of commitment to "teaching the less taught languages". There are certainly plenty of them.
                > > >
                > > > As far as digital Wright, do you know of this link:
                > > > http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/goth_wright_about.html#images
                > > >
                > > > Looks like the following is PDF of Wright:
                > > > http://books.google.com/books?id=PjlcAAAAMAAJ&oe=UTF-8
                > > >
                > > > And I recently discovered this link to a number of other online Gothic resources:
                > > > http://www.lexilogos.com/english/index.htm
                > > >
                > > > There's probably a bunch more great stuff out there too... I am not at all a "technology person".
                > > >
                > > > Lambdin is a wonderful book, with thorough, clear "lessons" (chapters); generous supply of biblical texts with full glossary; and a set of chapters on historical Germanic linguistics to boot! One thing that I don't care for: He dispensed with the tradition of supplying accents to disambiguate monophthong <ai'> vs. diphthong <a'i>, and <au'> vs. <a'u>. To me this is disadvantageous to the new learner.
                > > >
                > > > If you (or anyone on this list) happens to live in central Ohio, USA, please come and attend my monthly Gothic Language Reading Group at Ohio State University. We are using Bennett's Intro to the Gothic language; it seemed to me like the best, most "accessible" way into the language for the audience we have here. You might start with Bennett, but augment your study with Lambdin.
                > > >
                > > > "Reading and enjoying the activity"--is a most worthy contribution! We are certainly not into this stuff for the money. (-;
                > > >
                > > > Cheers,
                > > > David C.
                > > >
                > > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "underwoodjustine" <underwoodjustine@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Hails all,
                > > > >
                > > > > As requested by the welcome email, I would like to introduce myself. My name is Justine, I am interested in endangered and extinct languages and linguistics (or "tugga-wissei" as the neologism list has it). I am especially interested in Native American (specifically Cherokee) and Germanic languages.
                > > > >
                > > > > Language extinction, preservation, and revival are my primary focus at the moment. I have a BA in English and in theology and ministry. I minored in biblical Greek (which has been helpful in studying Gothic) and Hebrew. I hope to receive my master's in Linguistics and go on to teach the less-taught languages.
                > > > >
                > > > > This group is an amazing find, and the amount of activity and history of posts is nothing short of remarkable. Apologies in advance if my greatest contribution at this point is reading and enjoying the activity.
                > > > >
                > > > > I do have a stereotypical newcomer question to pose: I am currently using Bennett's text and cautiously considering springing for Lambdin's...I have heard many good things about it but have not had a chance to flip through it and get an impression of my own. has anyone here had experiences with both texts and, if so, can you offer me some insight?
                > > > >
                > > > > Also, while I have been enjoying Wright's grammar in .TIF format, page by page, I wonder if anyone has published it as a single .PDF and I just haven't found it yet...? Apologies if both of these questions have been addressed in previous posts.
                > > > >
                > > > > Justine
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
              • underwoodjustine
                Hi there Edmund, I hate to resurrect an old post, but if you would render razdakunthi for linguistics, how would you render linguist? *razdakunthja,
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 18, 2013
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                  Hi there Edmund, I hate to resurrect an old post, but if you would render "razdakunthi" for linguistics, how would you render "linguist?"  *razdakunthja, perhaps?

                • Edmund Fairfax
                  Dear Justine, *Razdakunthja would be my first choice. The use of the suffix -jato form nomina agentis from nouns is well attested in Gothic: fiskja, liugnja,
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 18, 2013
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                    Dear Justine,

                    *Razdakunthja would be my first choice. The use of the suffix -ja to form nomina agentis from nouns is well attested in Gothic: fiskja, liugnja, timrja, gudja, wardja, skattja, skilja, waurstwja, kasja, swiglja, ferja, haurnja, afdrugkja, weindrugkja, afetja, bihaitja, arbinumja, fauragaggja, gasinthja, ingardja, nehwundja.

                    A good treatment of early Germanic word-formation can be found in Friedrich Kluge's Nominale Stammbildungslehre der altgermanischen Dialekte. Even though published in 1926, it is still one of the best. A further source is Wolfgang Meid's Germanische Sprachwissenschaft von Dr. H. Krahe, III Wortbildung (1967).

                    I might add here as an aside, hopefully of interest, that the -j- suffix was also used to form patronymics ('so-and-so, son of son-and-son') in Germanic. This usage is clearly attested in the earliest runic inscriptions (I give normalized forms in the following):

                    Ek Hlewagastiz Holtijaz (Gallehus horn) 'I Hlewagastiz, son of Holtaz'
                    Ek Aljamarkiz Baiijaz (Karstad stone) 'I Aljamarkiz, son of Bajaz'

                    The cognate in Gaulish (-ios) was similarly used, e.g. Kongennolitanos Kartsilitanios 'Kongennolitanos, son of Kartsilitanos'.

                    Edmund



                    On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 1:25:35 PM, "underwoodjustine@..." <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
                     
                    Hi there Edmund, I hate to resurrect an old post, but if you would render "razdakunthi" for linguistics, how would you render "linguist?"  *razdakunthja, perhaps?


                  • Edmund Fairfax
                    Dear Justine, As a postscript, it goes without saying that a *razdakunthja would be masculine, and that the feminine counterpart would be *razdakunthjo. Edmund
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 18, 2013
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                      Dear Justine,

                      As a postscript, it goes without saying that a *razdakunthja would be masculine, and that the feminine counterpart would be *razdakunthjo.

                      Edmund


                      On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 3:55:59 PM, Edmund Fairfax <edmundfairfax@...> wrote:
                       
                      Dear Justine,

                      *Razdakunthja would be my first choice. The use of the suffix -ja to form nomina agentis from nouns is well attested in Gothic: fiskja, liugnja, timrja, gudja, wardja, skattja, skilja, waurstwja, kasja, swiglja, ferja, haurnja, afdrugkja, weindrugkja, afetja, bihaitja, arbinumja, fauragaggja, gasinthja, ingardja, nehwundja.

                      A good treatment of early Germanic word-formation can be found in Friedrich Kluge's Nominale Stammbildungslehre der altgermanischen Dialekte. Even though published in 1926, it is still one of the best. A further source is Wolfgang Meid's Germanische Sprachwissenschaft von Dr. H. Krahe, III Wortbildung (1967).

                      I might add here as an aside, hopefully of interest, that the -j- suffix was also used to form patronymics ('so-and-so, son of son-and-son') in Germanic. This usage is clearly attested in the earliest runic inscriptions (I give normalized forms in the following):

                      Ek Hlewagastiz Holtijaz (Gallehus horn) 'I Hlewagastiz, son of Holtaz'
                      Ek Aljamarkiz Baiijaz (Karstad stone) 'I Aljamarkiz, son of Bajaz'

                      The cognate in Gaulish (-ios) was similarly used, e.g. Kongennolitanos Kartsilitanios 'Kongennolitanos, son of Kartsilitanos'.

                      Edmund



                      On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 1:25:35 PM, "underwoodjustine@..." <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
                       
                      Hi there Edmund, I hate to resurrect an old post, but if you would render "razdakunthi" for linguistics, how would you render "linguist?"  *razdakunthja, perhaps?




                    • Edmund Fairfax
                      Dear Justine, As a postscript, it goes without saying that a *razdakunthja would be masculine, and that the feminine counterpart would be *razdakunthjo. Edmund
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 18, 2013
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                        Dear Justine,

                        As a postscript, it goes without saying that a *razdakunthja would be masculine, and that the feminine counterpart would be *razdakunthjo.

                        Edmund


                        On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 3:55:59 PM, Edmund Fairfax <edmundfairfax@...> wrote:
                         
                        Dear Justine,

                        *Razdakunthja would be my first choice. The use of the suffix -ja to form nomina agentis from nouns is well attested in Gothic: fiskja, liugnja, timrja, gudja, wardja, skattja, skilja, waurstwja, kasja, swiglja, ferja, haurnja, afdrugkja, weindrugkja, afetja, bihaitja, arbinumja, fauragaggja, gasinthja, ingardja, nehwundja.

                        A good treatment of early Germanic word-formation can be found in Friedrich Kluge's Nominale Stammbildungslehre der altgermanischen Dialekte. Even though published in 1926, it is still one of the best. A further source is Wolfgang Meid's Germanische Sprachwissenschaft von Dr. H. Krahe, III Wortbildung (1967).

                        I might add here as an aside, hopefully of interest, that the -j- suffix was also used to form patronymics ('so-and-so, son of son-and-son') in Germanic. This usage is clearly attested in the earliest runic inscriptions (I give normalized forms in the following):

                        Ek Hlewagastiz Holtijaz (Gallehus horn) 'I Hlewagastiz, son of Holtaz'
                        Ek Aljamarkiz Baiijaz (Karstad stone) 'I Aljamarkiz, son of Bajaz'

                        The cognate in Gaulish (-ios) was similarly used, e.g. Kongennolitanos Kartsilitanios 'Kongennolitanos, son of Kartsilitanos'.

                        Edmund



                        On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 1:25:35 PM, "underwoodjustine@..." <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
                         
                        Hi there Edmund, I hate to resurrect an old post, but if you would render "razdakunthi" for linguistics, how would you render "linguist?"  *razdakunthja, perhaps?




                      • Edmund Fairfax
                        Dear Justine, As a postscript, it goes without saying that a *razdakunthja would be masculine, and that the feminine counterpart would be *razdakunthjo. Edmund
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 18, 2013
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                          Dear Justine,

                          As a postscript, it goes without saying that a *razdakunthja would be masculine, and that the feminine counterpart would be *razdakunthjo.

                          Edmund


                          On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 3:55:59 PM, Edmund Fairfax <edmundfairfax@...> wrote:
                           
                          Dear Justine,

                          *Razdakunthja would be my first choice. The use of the suffix -ja to form nomina agentis from nouns is well attested in Gothic: fiskja, liugnja, timrja, gudja, wardja, skattja, skilja, waurstwja, kasja, swiglja, ferja, haurnja, afdrugkja, weindrugkja, afetja, bihaitja, arbinumja, fauragaggja, gasinthja, ingardja, nehwundja.

                          A good treatment of early Germanic word-formation can be found in Friedrich Kluge's Nominale Stammbildungslehre der altgermanischen Dialekte. Even though published in 1926, it is still one of the best. A further source is Wolfgang Meid's Germanische Sprachwissenschaft von Dr. H. Krahe, III Wortbildung (1967).

                          I might add here as an aside, hopefully of interest, that the -j- suffix was also used to form patronymics ('so-and-so, son of son-and-son') in Germanic. This usage is clearly attested in the earliest runic inscriptions (I give normalized forms in the following):

                          Ek Hlewagastiz Holtijaz (Gallehus horn) 'I Hlewagastiz, son of Holtaz'
                          Ek Aljamarkiz Baiijaz (Karstad stone) 'I Aljamarkiz, son of Bajaz'

                          The cognate in Gaulish (-ios) was similarly used, e.g. Kongennolitanos Kartsilitanios 'Kongennolitanos, son of Kartsilitanos'.

                          Edmund



                          On Wednesday, December 18, 2013 1:25:35 PM, "underwoodjustine@..." <underwoodjustine@...> wrote:
                           
                          Hi there Edmund, I hate to resurrect an old post, but if you would render "razdakunthi" for linguistics, how would you render "linguist?"  *razdakunthja, perhaps?




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