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Frankenbeasts through Gothic Eyes

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  • Edmund Fairfax
    Atsaihwith faura thaim diuzam! Sums staths ist -- than manna du Babylauniai leithith -- saei haitada Laintibailsinaia, ana thammei bairanda *hanons galeikos
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 29, 2013
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      Atsaihwith faura thaim diuzam!

      Sums staths ist -- than manna du Babylauniai leithith -- saei haitada Laintibailsinaia, ana thammei bairanda *hanons galeikos thaimei in unsis sind raudis hiwjis*. Jah jabai thos hwa niman wili aiththau thaim attekan, *frabrannjand allata is leik...Jainaruhthan bairanda wilthja diuza. Jah tho diuza, bithe mans stibna gahausjand, suns thliuhand. Haband ahtau fotuns jah haljarunos augona jah twa haubida. Jabai tho hwa gafahan wili, sein leik intandjand...

      Beware these beasts!

      There is a place -- when one goes to Babylonia -- which is called Lentibelsinea, wherein hens are born like those among us which are red. If anyone tries to take a hold of them or touch them, they incinerate his body...Wild beasts are also born there. Whenever these animals hear a person's voice, they at once flee. They have eight feet, witch-eyes, and two heads. If someone is about to catch them, they set their body aflame...

      Note:
      An asterisk before a word indicates a conjectural form, an asterisk following a conjectural meaning. The text is from a passage in the Old English >Wonders of the East<, normalized here (the letter 'eth' is rendered as 'th', as in the Gothic passage above, and 'ash' as 'ae'):

      sum stow is -- thonne mann faerth to thaere Readan Sae -- seo is gehaten Lentibelsinea, on thaem beoth henna acende gelice thaem the mid us beoth reades hiwes. And gif hie hwic mann niman wile oththe hira aethrineth, thonne forbaernath hie sona eall his lic. Thaet sindon ungefraegelicu lybblac. Eac swa thaer beoth wilddeor cennede. Tha deor, thonne hie mannes stefne gehierath, thonne hrathe hie fleoth. Tha deor habbath eahta fet and waelcyrgan eagan and twa heafdu. Gif hie hwilc mann gefon wile, thonne hira lichaman, thaet hie onaelath. Thaet sindon ungefraegelicu deor.

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    • David Connolly
      Are you just translating this interesting OE text into Gothic for fun?  This ain t no Wulfila, by golly! Did you mean to omit the final OE sentence from the
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 29, 2013
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        Are you just translating this interesting OE text into Gothic for fun?  This ain't no Wulfila, by golly!

        Did you mean to omit the final OE sentence from the translations - "Thaet sindon ungefraegelicu deor." - ?




        ________________________________
        From: Edmund Fairfax <edmundfairfax@...>
        To: "gothic-l@yahoogroups.com" <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 8:49 PM
        Subject: [gothic-l] Frankenbeasts through Gothic Eyes



         


        Atsaihwith faura thaim diuzam!

        Sums staths ist -- than manna du Babylauniai leithith -- saei haitada Laintibailsinaia, ana thammei bairanda *hanons galeikos thaimei in unsis sind raudis hiwjis*. Jah jabai thos hwa niman wili aiththau thaim attekan, *frabrannjand allata is leik...Jainaruhthan bairanda wilthja diuza. Jah tho diuza, bithe mans stibna gahausjand, suns thliuhand. Haband ahtau fotuns jah haljarunos augona jah twa haubida. Jabai tho hwa gafahan wili, sein leik intandjand...

        Beware these beasts!

        There is a place -- when one goes to Babylonia -- which is called Lentibelsinea, wherein hens are born like those among us which are red. If anyone tries to take a hold of them or touch them, they incinerate his body...Wild beasts are also born there. Whenever these animals hear a person's voice, they at once flee. They have eight feet, witch-eyes, and two heads. If someone is about to catch them, they set their body aflame...

        Note:
        An asterisk before a word indicates a conjectural form, an asterisk following a conjectural meaning. The text is from a passage in the Old English >Wonders of the East<, normalized here (the letter 'eth' is rendered as 'th', as in the Gothic passage above, and 'ash' as 'ae'):

        sum stow is -- thonne mann faerth to thaere Readan Sae -- seo is gehaten Lentibelsinea, on thaem beoth henna acende gelice thaem the mid us beoth reades hiwes. And gif hie hwic mann niman wile oththe hira aethrineth, thonne forbaernath hie sona eall his lic. Thaet sindon ungefraegelicu lybblac. Eac swa thaer beoth wilddeor cennede. Tha deor, thonne hie mannes stefne gehierath, thonne hrathe hie fleoth. Tha deor habbath eahta fet and waelcyrgan eagan and twa heafdu. Gif hie hwilc mann gefon wile, thonne hira lichaman, thaet hie onaelath. Thaet sindon ungefraegelicu deor.

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      • Edmund Fairfax
        Dear David, The omission of two lines from the Old English original was deliberate: I was unable to find any word in Gothic that could render OE ungefraegelic
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 2 8:37 AM
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          Dear David,

          The omission of two lines from the Old English original was deliberate: I was unable to find any word in Gothic that could render OE ungefraegelic 'extraordinary, remarkable, unheard-of,' nor could I create a suitable neologism. But such omissions were certainly not unknown to translators in the ancient world and later, and so I reckon myself to be in good company.
          I noticed in rereading the post that the OE clause 'thonne mann faerth to thaere Readan Sae' was rendered as 'than manna du Babylauniai leithith'. The latter is in fact part of the opening from a different passage, which somehow came to mind first when I translated. As the OE text stands, the Gothic should read rather 'than manna leithith du Raudon Marein'. The only example of a placename consisting of a common noun modified by an adjective that I have been able to find in the Gothic corpus is 'fairgunja alewjin' (dative) "Mount of Olives" (lit. 'mount olivine'). Interestingly, the weak declension of adjectives with no article/demonstrative is used here. The use of the weak declension without an article is also extant in Old English and still can be used in Modern Icelandic in certain contexts. Thus the form 'du Raudon Marein' rather than 'du thizai Raudon Marein' or 'du Raudai Marein', as one might otherwise expect.
          This translation, of course, was done in fun, as any attempt to write in Gothic can only be.

          In any case, thank you for your interest in my Gothicized frankenbeasts.

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