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Re: Gothic names

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  • autoreport
    Although Gothic was spoken in the Crimea into the 18th Century (but unfortunately rarely written), we unfortunately have a very limited vocabulary recorded
    Message 1 of 25 , Nov 5, 2012
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      Although Gothic was spoken in the Crimea into the 18th Century (but unfortunately rarely written), we unfortunately have a very limited vocabulary recorded compared to OE, Saxon, Old Frisian, Old Norse or even the various schools of High German. That can make it very difficult to match onomastic themes with a corresponding word in prosaic Gothic. Quite a number of themes are not recorded as independent word in any of the Germanic languages, even if they are, the semantic development is often quite different in Gothic than in West or North Germanic. In addition few Gothic names are recorded in something close to the original Gothic—most have been Latinized or altered by flawed analogy with Greek. Other Gothic names are recorded in a Latinized version of the Frankish form, conversely some Frankish names are recorded in a Latinized version of their Gothic form. We also know that names sometimes cross ethnic boundaries—Attila the Hun is best known by his Gothic honorific. Latin names are combined with Germanic themes, Gothic onomastic themes are adopted by other Germanic speakers (not always accurately) and the Indo-Iranian Alans brought onomastic themes from a more distant branch of Indo-European to the Germanic-speaking world. The popular "reiks" is ultimately Celtic (rix<rigs, cognate with Gothic ragin). Gothic itself is not as uniform as the resources may imply—there are clear differences between the few recorded Ostrogothic words and standard Visigothic of Ulfilas-itself Gothic as spoken in Moesia in the 4th-5th centuries and often called Moeso-Gothic. Visigothic spoken in other areas and other times was almost certainly different in some respects, just as many different varieties of High German are spoken alongside the "standard" Eastern-Middle High German of Luther.

      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Mike" <abrigon@...> wrote:
      >
      > The fun of names, is that just cause one source says it is spelled one
      > way, does not make it so. To many researchers have had limited space,
      > as well as limited samplings.. Theodorick or Theodorik, same name, but
      > different spelling. Fun is when the name goes thru atleast 2
      > intermediaries before it comes to English. Some languages don't have
      > letters and sounds for some sounds in Gothic (I suspose), so the names
      > get mangled.
      >
      > Mike
      > aka Morgoth (for now).
      >
    • write2andy
      I was coming up with a list of names in Gothic (meaning attested names and the Gothic counterparts to other names) a while back, and I thought we should
      Message 2 of 25 , Jan 28
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        I was coming up with a list of names in Gothic (meaning attested names and the Gothic counterparts to other names) a while back, and I thought we should discuss names here. Lots can be pulled from the Bible (Teimaúþaíus, Andraías, Marja, etc.), and, since so many common names in the western world are either Biblical or Germanic, we have a relatively easy time of making the Gothic counterparts.

        Here is a site I found, which has some names up to "F": http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/etc/in_progress/data/b0363.html

        Many dictionaries may also have a separate section for names and other proper nouns.

      • Dicentis a
        Lol what a coincidence! Before I opened my mail, I compiled a list with both Biblical attested names and reconstructed names! Check my attachment. 2015-01-29
        Message 3 of 25 , Jan 28
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          Lol what a coincidence! Before I opened my mail, I compiled a list with
          both Biblical attested names and reconstructed names!

          Check my attachment.

          2015-01-29 0:54 GMT+01:00 write2andy@... [gothic-l] <
          gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>:

          >
          >
          > I was coming up with a list of names in Gothic (meaning attested names and
          > the Gothic counterparts to other names) a while back, and I thought we
          > should discuss names here. Lots can be pulled from the Bible (Teimaúþaíus,
          > Andraías, Marja, etc.), and, since so many common names in the western
          > world are either Biblical or Germanic, we have a relatively easy time of
          > making the Gothic counterparts.
          >
          > Here is a site I found, which has some names up to "F":
          > http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/etc/in_progress/data/b0363.html
          >
          > Many dictionaries may also have a separate section for names and other
          > proper nouns.
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dicentis a
          As a lot of people which are interested in Gothic want to know their name in Gothic, I decided to make this list so that people can easily look up the Gothic
          Message 4 of 25 , Jan 28
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            As a lot of people which are interested in Gothic want to know their name in Gothic, I decided to make this list so that people can easily look up the Gothic equivalent of their names, be it attested in the Bible as that or reconstructed. I still have to add your name. 

            2015-01-29 2:00 GMT+01:00 Dicentis a <roellingua@...>:
            Lol what a coincidence! Before I opened my mail, I compiled a list with both Biblical attested names and reconstructed names!

            Check my attachment.

            2015-01-29 0:54 GMT+01:00 write2andy@... [gothic-l] <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>:
             

            I was coming up with a list of names in Gothic (meaning attested names and the Gothic counterparts to other names) a while back, and I thought we should discuss names here. Lots can be pulled from the Bible (Teimaúþaíus, Andraías, Marja, etc.), and, since so many common names in the western world are either Biblical or Germanic, we have a relatively easy time of making the Gothic counterparts.

            Here is a site I found, which has some names up to "F": http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/etc/in_progress/data/b0363.html

            Many dictionaries may also have a separate section for names and other proper nouns.



          • Dicentis a
            You can also call me hroþa , hroþo or hroþaland . Roel ... You can also call me hro þa , hro þo or hro þaland . Roel 2015-01-29 2:03 GMT+01:00
            Message 5 of 25 , Jan 28
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              You can also call me "hroþa", "hroþo" or "hroþaland".

              Roel

              2015-01-29 2:03 GMT+01:00 Dicentis a <roellingua@...>:
              As a lot of people which are interested in Gothic want to know their name in Gothic, I decided to make this list so that people can easily look up the Gothic equivalent of their names, be it attested in the Bible as that or reconstructed. I still have to add your name. 

              2015-01-29 2:00 GMT+01:00 Dicentis a <roellingua@...>:
              Lol what a coincidence! Before I opened my mail, I compiled a list with both Biblical attested names and reconstructed names!

              Check my attachment.

              2015-01-29 0:54 GMT+01:00 write2andy@... [gothic-l] <gothic-l@yahoogroups.com>:
               

              I was coming up with a list of names in Gothic (meaning attested names and the Gothic counterparts to other names) a while back, and I thought we should discuss names here. Lots can be pulled from the Bible (Teimaúþaíus, Andraías, Marja, etc.), and, since so many common names in the western world are either Biblical or Germanic, we have a relatively easy time of making the Gothic counterparts.

              Here is a site I found, which has some names up to "F": http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/etc/in_progress/data/b0363.html

              Many dictionaries may also have a separate section for names and other proper nouns.




            • write2andy
              Where is the attachment? I can t find it. I derive my name from the Old English andiġ , meaning zealous, envious, jealous, annoying and it suits my
              Message 6 of 25 , Jan 28
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                Where is the attachment? I can't find it.

                I derive my name from the Old English "andiġ", meaning "zealous, envious, jealous, annoying" and it suits my personality in some ways (though my pen-name is much better). The Gothic equivalent would be "Andag(-s/-a/-)". Most people derive it from "Andrew", which, in Gothic, is "Andraías".

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