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Gothic names, reconstructions, and derivations?

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  • marja erwin
    A while back I asked about possible reconstructions of the original Gothic form of Arimerios. I m still wondering about that, and about some other names from
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 6 5:54 PM
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      A while back I asked about possible reconstructions of the original
      Gothic form of 'Arimerios.' I'm still wondering about that, and about
      some other names from the later fourth century:

      Widely-accepted reconstructions:

      *Friþugairns for 'Fritigernus'

      Some hypothetical reconstructions:

      *Alaþius for 'Alatheus' and 'Alavivus' - this assumes deliberate
      reclamation of þius, perhaps to contrast with reiks.

      *Audaþius for 'Odotheus' - similar considerations apply

      *Airiwulfs for 'Eriulf' - early wolf?

      Still looking:

      'Arimerios'

      'Fravitta'

      Probably not Gothic, although if someone is familiar with Sarmatian,
      Alanic, or Ossetian, it would be nice to comment:

      'Saphrax'

      'Farnobius'

      [Farna has some religious significance - maybe favor, in Ossetic,
      right?]
    • Mike
      I m not an academic and my Gothic is rusty, so with that in mind, I ll try to answer your question as best as I can until someone more knowledgeable chimes in.
      Message 2 of 2 , May 15, 2012
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        I'm not an academic and my Gothic is rusty, so with that in mind, I'll try to answer your question as best as I can until someone more knowledgeable chimes in.

        The name 'Friþareikeikeis' (in the genitive) is attested in the calendar fragment we have. The scribe seems to have written '-keis' twice by mistake. There are some issues with Gothic stem vowels in the later period, and it seems like they merging or becoming schwas. I don't remember the details, but the attested names in the Latin sources become very inconsistent with them. So Friþa- is generally understood to be Friþu- with a confused stem vowel. The scribe probably couldn't hear the With Fritigern, there is an 'i' where we would expect a 'u' and I imagine it's the same issue at play. '-gairns' is fairly straightforward.

        Alaþius seems pretty transparent to me. Ala + þius. I'm not sure what to make of '-vivus', but I've seen some (very hypothetical) attempts to reconstruct it as a naming element.

        Audaþius is straightforward.

        For Airiwulfs, I'm not sure how to take the 'Airi-' element. It shows up in other names though, so it seems common enough. Eriulf, Erileoba, Eraric, Erwig... If you're not picky about your stem vowels, either 'Airi-' or 'Aira-' would make sense.

        For Airimerios, I would reconstruct it as Airimers or Airamers. Of the top of my head, I don't know if 'mer-' should be an i-stem or not.

        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, marja erwin <marja-e@...> wrote:
        >
        > A while back I asked about possible reconstructions of the original
        > Gothic form of 'Arimerios.' I'm still wondering about that, and about
        > some other names from the later fourth century:
        >
        > Widely-accepted reconstructions:
        >
        > *Friþugairns for 'Fritigernus'
        >
        > Some hypothetical reconstructions:
        >
        > *Alaþius for 'Alatheus' and 'Alavivus' - this assumes deliberate
        > reclamation of þius, perhaps to contrast with reiks.
        >
        > *Audaþius for 'Odotheus' - similar considerations apply
        >
        > *Airiwulfs for 'Eriulf' - early wolf?
        >
        > Still looking:
        >
        > 'Arimerios'
        >
        > 'Fravitta'
        >
        > Probably not Gothic, although if someone is familiar with Sarmatian,
        > Alanic, or Ossetian, it would be nice to comment:
        >
        > 'Saphrax'
        >
        > 'Farnobius'
        >
        > [Farna has some religious significance - maybe favor, in Ossetic,
        > right?]
        >
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