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Re: Some words

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  • Frithureiks
    I would assume that Lent (lenten) would correspond to a gothic *laggateins where the latter part is the same as in sinteino and cognate to slavic den = day.
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 11, 2012
      I would assume that Lent (lenten) would correspond to a gothic *laggateins where the latter part is the same as in sinteino and cognate to slavic den = day.

      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Grsartor@... wrote:
      >
      > Hailai,
      >
      > Herewith, a few comments about suggestions for words not attested in
      > Gothic, though probably not much in the way of material help.
      >
      > The season-word we can be the most confident about is "wintrus", occurring
      > in John 10:22. "Asans" is attested for summer, but it translates Greek
      > words that seem to have a sense of "harvest": theros and therismos. I do not
      > know whether for the Greeks the harvest was regarded as part of summer; but
      > if so, perhaps Wulfila would have chosen some other word if he had not been
      > influenced by the language he was translating.
      >
      > As for the other seasons, I do not know whether there was much uniformity
      > among the Germanic peoples in their names for spring and autumn, since it is
      > said they divided the year into only two seasons, winter and summer. The
      > German Lenz (cognate with English Lent) is said to derive from len(gi)zin,
      > from *langat-tin, which had the meaning "having long days". Icelandic "vor"
      > looks like Latin "ver", but whether they are related I do not know.
      >
      > The word German and English share for "autumn" is Herbst/harvest. How this
      > is related to Icelandic "haust", if at all, I do not know.
      >
      > For a way of saying "too", in a sense that implies excess, perhaps
      > "ufar"might be used. It occurs in "ufarfulls" = overfull, and looks like Icelandic
      > of/ofur, which has the same sense. However, "ufar" by no means seems to
      > have a general tendency to indicate excess: for example "ufargaggan" means to
      > go over, to cross, rather than to go too far, and there are several other
      > constructions that have "ufar" not implying that something has been done to
      > excess.
      >
      > For a word meaning to oppose, resist, or the like, use could possibly be
      > made of something meaning to fight or contend (e.g. haifstjan, weihan)
      > followed by "withra" + accusative = against. In Codex A of Romans 9:13 a form of
      > "andweihan" means "warring against". And in Luke 18:3 "andastathjis" is an
      > adversary, from which we might conjecture a verb "and(a)standan (?)
      >
      > For a verb meaning to depart, "twisstandan" occurs in 2Cor 2:13 for "depart
      > from".
      >
      > I am afraid the above contains more caveats and confessions of ignorance
      > than assertions, but owing to the dearth of replies to the original questions
      > I offer it for what it is worth.
      >
      > Making words up to fill the gaps in what we know of Gothic is an enterprise
      > that deserves careful thought and diligent investigation; it would be easy
      > to do it badly. I am therefore reluctant to roll my own Gothic. To
      > postulate a Gothic word corresponding to something that is common Germanic (e.g. a
      > word for "green") requires a knowledge of how sounds have changed in the
      > various Germanic tongues, and in particular of how they changed in Gothic. I
      > believe many reconstructions were done long ago by Jakob Grimm. For
      > present help, if Llama_nom is still active he would be a valuable source of
      > advice.
      >
      > Gerry T.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 25/02/2012 05:50:44 GMT Standard Time,
      > anheropl0x@... writes:
      >
      > Also, German Abschied (parting or farewell). Pretty obvious it would come
      > from something like the verb afskaidan, though the verb to bid farewell is
      > andqithan, I believe.
      >
      > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "anheropl0x" <anheropl0x@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm currently on my phone, so I can't access any of the neoglism files,
      > but I was curious what you might think the translations of these two
      > words/phrases are.
      > >
      > > Resistance (Widerstand)
      > > Too many (zu viel)
      > >
      > > I found in one dictionary that has andstandan for to resist, but I'm not
      > sure which suffix to use to make it a noun. I haven't looked at wiktionary
      > yet, but I doubt it will have much (I often reconstruct from
      > proto-germanic or go by analogy of another Germanic language). If I can think of any
      > more words, I will add them.
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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