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Family relations in the gothic language

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  • kevin.behrens@rocketmail.com
    Hello, I wondered and tried to do some research about how the family relations were called and which system it was in the gothic language. In the dictionary by
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 3, 2012
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      Hello,
      I wondered and tried to do some research about how the family relations were called and which system it was in the gothic language. In the dictionary by Köbler there are just some basic words like "mother" or "brother". So, what were or might have been the words for "great grandmother" or "cousin" or "big brother" etc.
      If you have any sources or ideas, I would be really thankful.
      Greetings,
      Kevin
    • anheropl0x
      Chances are, for cousin and the like, they simply called other people kinsmen. Even the etymology dictionary, which says cousin is from Old French cosin,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 3, 2012
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        Chances are, for cousin and the like, they simply called other people kinsmen. Even the etymology dictionary, which says cousin is from Old French cosin, carried the meaning of kinsman. As for the "great" in grandmother and such, German uses "Ur" (proto-germanic uz, so perhaps Gothic us?), which means original or primitive. Examples are Urheimat and Uradel.

        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "kevin.behrens@..." <becareful_icanseeyourfuture@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        > I wondered and tried to do some research about how the family relations were called and which system it was in the gothic language. In the dictionary by Köbler there are just some basic words like "mother" or "brother". So, what were or might have been the words for "great grandmother" or "cousin" or "big brother" etc.
        > If you have any sources or ideas, I would be really thankful.
        > Greetings,
        > Kevin
        >
      • Mike
        The attested terms are: atta / fadar - father aiþei / modar* - mother broþar - brother swistar - sister sunus - son dauhtar - daughter swaihra -
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 3, 2012
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          The attested terms are:

          atta / fadar - father
          aiþei / modar* - mother
          broþar - brother
          swistar - sister
          sunus - son
          dauhtar - daughter
          swaihra - father-in-law
          swaihro - mother-in-law

          'Atta' and 'aiþei' are the words that are typically used for father and mother. There is one instance of 'fadar' in Galatians 4:6, and 'modar' is a possible reconstruction analogous to 'fadar'. Unfortunately, only so much of the language has survived, so other terms for family relationships would have to be reconstructed.




          --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "kevin.behrens@..." <becareful_icanseeyourfuture@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello,
          > I wondered and tried to do some research about how the family relations were called and which system it was in the gothic language. In the dictionary by Köbler there are just some basic words like "mother" or "brother". So, what were or might have been the words for "great grandmother" or "cousin" or "big brother" etc.
          > If you have any sources or ideas, I would be really thankful.
          > Greetings,
          > Kevin
          >
        • gotenfreund
          Check Peter Heather s The Visigoths from the Migration Period to the 7th Century: An Ethnographic Perspective, p. 139 ff., especially pp. 141-142. He discusses
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 3, 2012
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            Check Peter Heather's The Visigoths from the Migration Period to the 7th Century: An Ethnographic Perspective, p. 139 ff., especially pp. 141-142. He discusses this topic and lists all attested kinship terms.

            --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "kevin.behrens@..." <becareful_icanseeyourfuture@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello,
            > I wondered and tried to do some research about how the family relations were called and which system it was in the gothic language. In the dictionary by Köbler there are just some basic words like "mother" or "brother". So, what were or might have been the words for "great grandmother" or "cousin" or "big brother" etc.
            > If you have any sources or ideas, I would be really thankful.
            > Greetings,
            > Kevin
            >
          • kevin.behrens@rocketmail.com
            I really thank you for the tipps and sources. I now made a little list with possible names. Mutter – aiþei, modar Vater – atta, fadar Bruder / brother –
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 4, 2012
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              I really thank you for the tipps and sources.
              I now made a little list with possible names.

              Mutter – aiþei, modar
              Vater – atta, fadar
              Bruder / brother – broþar
              Schwester / sister– swistar
              Sohn / son – sunus
              Tochter / daughter – dauhtar
              Großmutter / grandmother - awo(fadarmodar, modarmodar)
              Großvater / grandfather - awa(fadarfadar, modarfadar)
              Großeltern / grandparents - fadrein
              Cousin – gadiliggs
              Cousine – gadiliggo
              Neffe / nephew – niþjis (actually kinsman, but Peter Heather sees it as nephew, which would be etymological logical)
              Nichte / niece– niþjo
              Onkel / uncle – modarbroþar, fadarbroþar / baro (vgl. barus (Rothari's edict)
              Tante / aunt – modarswistar, fadarswistrar / bara
              Ur- - us-
              Schwiegervater / father-in-law – swaihra
              Schwiegermutter / mother-in-law– swaihro
              Schwiegersohn / son-in-law – megs
              Schwiegertochter / daughter-in-law – bruþs, snuzo
              groß- / grand- - *mikil- / *alda-
              Enkel / grandchild – *barnisbarn / *leitilbarn / forms as above

              I didn't know how to say uncle or aunt. When we look at the scandinavian languages such formulations are quite frequent. But there is no such formulation attested for gothic. And uncle and aunt are derrived from the latin language.
              The dictionary of Köbler has forms for son- and daughter-in-law.
              us- as a form for ur- seems also to be attested.
              Even for groß- / grand- I wasn't sure. There are mostly forms with words that have the same etymologie as great- or grand-. But there is no such word in gothic. So, mikil- or also alda- could be possible, but don't fit that well in my subjective opinion. What do you think?
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