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Re: Glad Påsk!

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  • Ingemar Nordgren
    Hi Gerry! Of course that is essentially true as it also was for the Goths. Linguistically it hence proves nothing and I admit I was thinking wrongly. Still we
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 24, 2011
      Hi Gerry!

      Of course that is essentially true as it also was for the Goths. Linguistically it hence proves nothing and I admit I was thinking wrongly. Still we have the question why just Scandinavia and not the rest of the Germanic world - esentially Germany and Britain - accepted this Greek word. The French have paque of course but the present French is strongly romanized. I have no idea of what the Franks called it. Any suggestions?

      Ingemar

      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Grsartor@... wrote:
      >
      > I think we should be careful about drawing conclusions concerning the
      > distribution "pask" for Easter. Is this word not likely to be from Greek
      > "pascha", which in turn was from Hebrew? Compare the English words "paschal" and
      > (archaic) pasch.
      >
      > Gerry T.
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 23/04/2011 22:13:52 GMT Daylight Time,
      > ingemar@... writes:
      >
      > Glad Påsk or happy Paska! Maybe it is thinkworth that Swedish and the
      > other Scandinavian languages use the closest cognate to Gothic paska. It
      > shows still a connection between North- and Eastgermanic.
      >
      > Ingemar
      >
      >
      >
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