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Goda Austaradulþ allaim!

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  • Frithureiks
    Hello and Happy Easter to everyone. What I know there are two words suited for Easter in gothic: dulþs and paska. The first meaning party/festival and the
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 22 2:23 AM
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      Hello and Happy Easter to everyone.

      What I know there are two words suited for 'Easter' in gothic: dulþs and paska. The first meaning party/festival and the latter meaning Easter in the judeo-christian sence.

      But what in the heathen sence? The english call it Easter to celebrate the old Godess of Spring, Éastre and the germans call it Ostern to celebrate the same Godess, which they called Ostara.
      If the goths worshiped her to, they would perhaps have called her Austara and hence this Easter would be Austaradulþs 'Festival of Éastre".

      Otherwise maybe wezradulþs = Spring festival, to celebrate the spring.
    • Ingemar Nordgren
      Why would they have this special goddess who seems rather to have a Celtic background regarding the sound of the name. Why not Njärðr/Nerthus or Freja? Hence
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 22 7:45 AM
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        Why would they have this special goddess who seems rather to have a Celtic background regarding the sound of the name. Why not Njärðr/Nerthus or Freja? Hence maybe Niarðardulþ or Frijadulþ.

        Just a suggestion!

        Ingemar

        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello and Happy Easter to everyone.
        >
        > What I know there are two words suited for 'Easter' in gothic: dulþs and paska. The first meaning party/festival and the latter meaning Easter in the judeo-christian sence.
        >
        > But what in the heathen sence? The english call it Easter to celebrate the old Godess of Spring, Éastre and the germans call it Ostern to celebrate the same Godess, which they called Ostara.
        > If the goths worshiped her to, they would perhaps have called her Austara and hence this Easter would be Austaradulþs 'Festival of Éastre".
        >
        > Otherwise maybe wezradulþs = Spring festival, to celebrate the spring.
        >
      • Brian Smith
        The Anglo-Saxon goddess Éostre has reflexes in Vedic culture (Usha), Greece (Eos), Roman (Iris) cultures. Grimm hypothesised an Ostara, though there is no
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 22 7:48 AM
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          The Anglo-Saxon goddess Éostre has reflexes in Vedic culture (Usha), Greece
          (Eos), Roman (Iris) cultures. Grimm hypothesised an Ostara, though there is no
          written evidence for a Continental Germanic goddess bearing that name.


          Brian




          ________________________________
          From: Ingemar Nordgren <ingemar@...>
          To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, April 22, 2011 10:45:18 AM
          Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Goda Austaradulþ allaim!

           
          Why would they have this special goddess who seems rather to have a Celtic
          background regarding the sound of the name. Why not Njärðr/Nerthus or Freja?
          Hence maybe Niarðardulþ or Frijadulþ.

          Just a suggestion!

          Ingemar

          --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello and Happy Easter to everyone.
          >
          > What I know there are two words suited for 'Easter' in gothic: dulþs and paska.
          >The first meaning party/festival and the latter meaning Easter in the
          >judeo-christian sence.
          >
          > But what in the heathen sence? The english call it Easter to celebrate the old
          >Godess of Spring, Éastre and the germans call it Ostern to celebrate the same
          >Godess, which they called Ostara.
          > If the goths worshiped her to, they would perhaps have called her Austara and
          >hence this Easter would be Austaradulþs 'Festival of Éastre".
          >
          > Otherwise maybe wezradulþs = Spring festival, to celebrate the spring.
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • thomasruhm
          Would Ostara be the Old High German reconstructed form?
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 22 8:04 AM
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            Would Ostara be the Old High German reconstructed form?
          • Brian Smith
            To the best of my knowledge, the OHG form would be Ostarâ. Per Grimm: We Germans to this day call April ostermonat, and ôstarmânoth is found as early as
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 22 8:27 AM
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              To the best of my knowledge, the OHG form would be Ostarâ.

              Per Grimm:

              "We Germans to this day call April ostermonat, and ôstarmânoth is found as early
              as Eginhart (temp. Car. Mag.). The great christian festival, which usually falls
              in April or the end of March, bears in the oldest of OHG. remains the name
              ôstarâ gen. -ûn; it is mostly found in the plural, because two days (ôstartagâ,
              aostortagâ, Diut. 1, 266ª) were kept at Easter. This Ostarâ, like the AS.
              Eástre, must in the heathen religion have denoted a higher being, whose worship
              was so firmly rooted, that the christian teachers tolerated the name, and
              applied it to one of thier own grandest anniversaries."

              Brian




              ________________________________
              From: thomasruhm <thomas@...>
              To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, April 22, 2011 11:04:06 AM
              Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Goda Austaradulþ allaim!

               
              Would Ostara be the Old High German reconstructed form?




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Frithureiks
              Is it really celtic origin? I assumed all continental germanic people had this Goddess since it seems both germans and the english knew about her. Nairþus
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 23 5:24 AM
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                Is it really celtic origin? I assumed all continental germanic people had this Goddess since it seems both germans and the english knew about her.

                Nairþus för Njorðr/Njord and Friddja for Frigga and Fraujo for Freya would be suited names I suppose.

                --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Ingemar Nordgren" <ingemar@...> wrote:
                >
                > Why would they have this special goddess who seems rather to have a Celtic background regarding the sound of the name. Why not Njärðr/Nerthus or Freja? Hence maybe Niarðardulþ or Frijadulþ.
                >
                > Just a suggestion!
                >
                > Ingemar
                >
                > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hello and Happy Easter to everyone.
                > >
                > > What I know there are two words suited for 'Easter' in gothic: dulþs and paska. The first meaning party/festival and the latter meaning Easter in the judeo-christian sence.
                > >
                > > But what in the heathen sence? The english call it Easter to celebrate the old Godess of Spring, Éastre and the germans call it Ostern to celebrate the same Godess, which they called Ostara.
                > > If the goths worshiped her to, they would perhaps have called her Austara and hence this Easter would be Austaradulþs 'Festival of Éastre".
                > >
                > > Otherwise maybe wezradulþs = Spring festival, to celebrate the spring.
                > >
                >
              • Brian Smith
                the -us in your proposed Nairþus, is a Latin convention. Brian ________________________________ From: Frithureiks To:
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 23 6:02 AM
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                  the -us in your proposed Nairþus, is a Latin convention.

                  Brian




                  ________________________________
                  From: Frithureiks <gadrauhts@...>
                  To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sat, April 23, 2011 8:24:21 AM
                  Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Goda Austaradulþ allaim!

                   
                  Is it really celtic origin? I assumed all continental germanic people had this
                  Goddess since it seems both germans and the english knew about her.

                  Nairþus för Njorðr/Njord and Friddja for Frigga and Fraujo for Freya would be
                  suited names I suppose.

                  --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Ingemar Nordgren" <ingemar@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Why would they have this special goddess who seems rather to have a Celtic
                  >background regarding the sound of the name. Why not Njärðr/Nerthus or Freja?
                  >Hence maybe Niarðardulþ or Frijadulþ.
                  >
                  > Just a suggestion!
                  >
                  > Ingemar
                  >
                  > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hello and Happy Easter to everyone.
                  > >
                  > > What I know there are two words suited for 'Easter' in gothic: dulþs and
                  >paska. The first meaning party/festival and the latter meaning Easter in the
                  >judeo-christian sence.
                  > >
                  > > But what in the heathen sence? The english call it Easter to celebrate the
                  >old Godess of Spring, Éastre and the germans call it Ostern to celebrate the
                  >same Godess, which they called Ostara.
                  > > If the goths worshiped her to, they would perhaps have called her Austara and
                  >hence this Easter would be Austaradulþs 'Festival of Éastre".
                  > >
                  > > Otherwise maybe wezradulþs = Spring festival, to celebrate the spring.
                  > >
                  >




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Frithureiks
                  Based on the name Njorðr I assume the original form was a u-stem and hence the gothic name would keep the ending -us. The related name Njärd would perhaps be
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 23 7:39 AM
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                    Based on the name Njorðr I assume the original form was a u-stem and hence the gothic name would keep the ending -us.
                    The related name Njärd would perhaps be different though.


                    --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, Brian Smith <heatheninfo@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > the -us in your proposed Nairþus, is a Latin convention.
                    >
                    > Brian
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Frithureiks <gadrauhts@...>
                    > To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Sat, April 23, 2011 8:24:21 AM
                    > Subject: [gothic-l] Re: Goda Austaradulþ allaim!
                    >
                    >  
                    > Is it really celtic origin? I assumed all continental germanic people had this
                    > Goddess since it seems both germans and the english knew about her.
                    >
                    > Nairþus för Njorðr/Njord and Friddja for Frigga and Fraujo for Freya would be
                    > suited names I suppose.
                    >
                    > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Ingemar Nordgren" <ingemar@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Why would they have this special goddess who seems rather to have a Celtic
                    > >background regarding the sound of the name. Why not Njärðr/Nerthus or Freja?
                    > >Hence maybe Niarðardulþ or Frijadulþ.
                    > >
                    > > Just a suggestion!
                    > >
                    > > Ingemar
                    > >
                    > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Hello and Happy Easter to everyone.
                    > > >
                    > > > What I know there are two words suited for 'Easter' in gothic: dulþs and
                    > >paska. The first meaning party/festival and the latter meaning Easter in the
                    > >judeo-christian sence.
                    > > >
                    > > > But what in the heathen sence? The english call it Easter to celebrate the
                    > >old Godess of Spring, Éastre and the germans call it Ostern to celebrate the
                    > >same Godess, which they called Ostara.
                    > > > If the goths worshiped her to, they would perhaps have called her Austara and
                    > >hence this Easter would be Austaradulþs 'Festival of Éastre".
                    > > >
                    > > > Otherwise maybe wezradulþs = Spring festival, to celebrate the spring.
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • thomasruhm
                    Thank you, Brian, because of Ôstarâ. I like Old High German.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 23 1:31 PM
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                      Thank you, Brian, because of Ôstarâ. I like Old High German.
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