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Re: Another random word.

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  • ○
    You should probably not use it in infinitive if you mean to say Welcome! to some one. I d say wailaqumans.
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 3, 2011
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      You should probably not use it in infinitive if you mean to say "Welcome!" to some one.
      I'd say wailaqumans.

      --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "anheropl0x" <anheropl0x@...> wrote:
      >
      > What do you linguists think? Should "welcome" in Gothic be something like wailaqiman or wiljaquiman? Going from this etymology of the word "welcome:" Origin:
      > bef. 900; ME < Scand; cf. ON velkominn, equiv. to vel well + kominn come (ptp.); r. OE wilcuma one who is welcome, equiv. to wil- welcome ( see will ) + cuma comer
      >
      > Or would wiljaqiman perhaps be wiliqiman?
      >
    • anheropl0x
      Such as Wailaqumans is þu! ? Or perhaps wailaqumana?
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 9, 2011
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        Such as "Wailaqumans is þu!"? Or perhaps wailaqumana?

        --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, ○ <gadrauhts@...> wrote:
        >
        > You should probably not use it in infinitive if you mean to say "Welcome!" to some one.
        > I'd say wailaqumans.
        >
        > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "anheropl0x" <anheropl0x@> wrote:
        > >
        > > What do you linguists think? Should "welcome" in Gothic be something like wailaqiman or wiljaquiman? Going from this etymology of the word "welcome:" Origin:
        > > bef. 900; ME < Scand; cf. ON velkominn, equiv. to vel well + kominn come (ptp.); r. OE wilcuma one who is welcome, equiv. to wil- welcome ( see will ) + cuma comer
        > >
        > > Or would wiljaqiman perhaps be wiliqiman?
        > >
        >
      • Frithureiks
        Yes, I would use it in that way. Þu is wailaqumans du haima meinamma so nehwisto wika.
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
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          Yes, I would use it in that way.

          "Þu is wailaqumans du haima meinamma so nehwisto wika."

          --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "anheropl0x" <anheropl0x@...> wrote:
          >
          > Such as "Wailaqumans is þu!"? Or perhaps wailaqumana?
          >
          > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, ○ <gadrauhts@> wrote:
          > >
          > > You should probably not use it in infinitive if you mean to say "Welcome!" to some one.
          > > I'd say wailaqumans.
          > >
          > > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "anheropl0x" <anheropl0x@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > What do you linguists think? Should "welcome" in Gothic be something like wailaqiman or wiljaquiman? Going from this etymology of the word "welcome:" Origin:
          > > > bef. 900; ME < Scand; cf. ON velkominn, equiv. to vel well + kominn come (ptp.); r. OE wilcuma one who is welcome, equiv. to wil- welcome ( see will ) + cuma comer
          > > >
          > > > Or would wiljaqiman perhaps be wiliqiman?
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • anheropl0x
          So nehwisto wika would be next week? How did you come about nehwisto ? Doesn t that -t- make it a superlative? I m guessing the exact translation then would
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 10, 2011
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            "So nehwisto wika" would be next week? How did you come about "nehwisto"? Doesn't that -t- make it a superlative? I'm guessing the exact translation then would be like "nearest week?"

            --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@...> wrote:
            >
            > Yes, I would use it in that way.
            >
            > "Þu is wailaqumans du haima meinamma so nehwisto wika."
            >
          • Frithureiks
            Yes, nehwisto is superlative of nehw and the meaning should be nearest or just even next which ofcourse also originally is superlative of the english
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 11, 2011
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              Yes, nehwisto is superlative of nehw and the meaning should be 'nearest' or just even 'next' which ofcourse also originally is superlative of the english cognate.

              According to one source the way to say 'on the next day' is 'iftumin daga' so 'on the next week' should then be 'iftumon wikai'.



              --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "anheropl0x" <anheropl0x@...> wrote:
              >
              > "So nehwisto wika" would be next week? How did you come about "nehwisto"? Doesn't that -t- make it a superlative? I'm guessing the exact translation then would be like "nearest week?"
              >
              > --- In gothic-l@yahoogroups.com, "Frithureiks" <gadrauhts@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Yes, I would use it in that way.
              > >
              > > "Þu is wailaqumans du haima meinamma so nehwisto wika."
              > >
              >
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