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Re: [gothic-l] Flamingo

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  • Thomas Ruhm
    I once read that flamingo might have something to do about Flemish. Maybe the flamish people had flamingos at zoos early, that is my guess. Happy New Year
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 31, 2010
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      I once read that flamingo might have something to do about Flemish. Maybe the flamish people had flamingos at zoos early, that is my guess.

      Happy New Year
    • Marja Erwin
      I thought Spanish domingo was derived from late Latin dominicus? ... Marja Erwin marja-e@riseup.net
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 31, 2010
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        I thought Spanish "domingo" was derived from late Latin dominicus?

        On Dec 31, 2010, at 11:35 AM, OSCAR HERRE wrote:

        > you are rite about it being in other cultures......i think in spanish they call sunday , domingo......it could be some sort of integral meaning as judgement day or something......dom, meaning judge and possibly domingo being some sort of derivative to explain as a judgement of time or day.....i have also read of guys here in the old west-u.s. having names like mingo or ringo.....

        Marja Erwin
        marja-e@...
      • OSCAR HERRE
        maybe the spanish took the name from the goths...im pretty sur the spanish lingo incorporated gothic names and sayins from back in the day......it also think
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 31, 2010
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          maybe the spanish took the name from the goths...im pretty sur the spanish lingo incorporated gothic names and sayins from back in the day......it also think the spanish use alot of their words from english and probably alot of other cultures as well use english words.....

          --- On Fri, 12/31/10, Marja Erwin <marja-e@...> wrote:


          From: Marja Erwin <marja-e@...>
          Subject: Re: [gothic-l] Flamingo
          To: gothic-l@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, December 31, 2010, 11:25 AM


           



          I thought Spanish "domingo" was derived from late Latin dominicus?

          On Dec 31, 2010, at 11:35 AM, OSCAR HERRE wrote:

          > you are rite about it being in other cultures......i think in spanish they call sunday , domingo......it could be some sort of integral meaning as judgement day or something......dom, meaning judge and possibly domingo being some sort of derivative to explain as a judgement of time or day.....i have also read of guys here in the old west-u.s. having names like mingo or ringo.....

          Marja Erwin
          marja-e@...








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        • manielombaard
          According to the Collins English Dictionary: from Spanish: like a gipsy, literally: Fleming, from Middle Dutch Vlaminc Fleming. According to the Websters
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 31, 2010
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            According to the Collins English Dictionary:

            from Spanish: like a gipsy, literally: Fleming, from Middle Dutch "Vlaminc" Fleming.

            According to the Websters Third International Dictionary:

            Spanish: Fleming, Flemish, buxom and ruddy, resembling a Gypsy, being in Gypsy style, gaudy, from Middle Dutch "Vlaminc" Fleming.

            According to the Duden:

            spanisch "flamenco", eigentlich = flämisch; (andalusischer) Zigeuner < mittelniederländisch "Vlaminc" = Flame)

            (but flamingo:

            Collins:

            from Portuguese "flamengo", from Provençal "flamenc"; from Latin "flamma" flame + Germanic suffix "-ing" denoting descent from or membership of.

            Webster:

            Portuguese, from Spanish "flamenco", probably from Old Provencal "flamenc", from "flama" flame, blaze, fire [from Latin "flamma"] + "-enc", of Germanic origin.

            Duden:

            spanisch "flamenco", vielleicht zu lateinisch "flamma" = Flamme [wegen des "geflammten" Gefieders].)


            Happy New Year
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